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The List of The World’s Most Expensive Cities 2010 via [forbes and businessweek]

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The World’s Most Expensive Cities 2010

by Venessa Wong

provided by
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For Americans overseas, exchange rates and cost-of-living
adjustments can make living overseas more expensive than back home.

New York ranks only No. 29

If you think $43 is too much to pay for lunch, you shouldn’t live in
Oslo. According to “ECA
International”
, a global human resources company, that’s how much an
average lunch costs in Norway’s capital. But Oslo is only the
second-most expensive city on ECA’s ranking of 399 global locations. And
while the price of an average lunch in Tokyo is a comparatively modest
$17.86, other costs, such as a $22 movie ticket and an $8.47 kilo of
rice, earn it the dubious honor as the world’s most expensive city.

ECA’s ranking is based on a basket of 128 goods that includes food,
daily goods, clothing, electronics, and entertainment, but not rent,
utilities, and school fees, which are not typically included in a
cost-of-living adjustment. ECA researchers and local partners gathered
prices in September 2009 and March 2010 for domestic and imported brands
that are internationally recognized—such as Kellogg’s cereal or
Sapporo beer. While lower-priced goods and services are available in
these markets, the study estimated the cost of supporting the standard
of living expected by expatriate employees, says Lee Quane, ECA’s
regional director for Asia. Some of the cities, such as Seoul and
Stockholm, jumped up in the ranking as the local currency strengthened
against the U.S. dollar. Quane says that while a slowdown in business
may tempt employers to scale back compensation, “recessions only last
so long” and retaining top talent in these places is critical to
companies’ success when the global economy recovers.
Source: “ECA International
1. Tokyo, Japan

dc.jpg

Rank in 2009: 2

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$18
Can of beer from grocer:
$3.37
One kg of rice: $8.47
One dozen
eggs:
$3.78

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$22

Appliances: Washing machine: $879

The strength of the yen has brought Tokyo back to the No. 1 spot on
ECA International’s ranking for the first time since 2005. In addition
to the costs above, rent for a two-bedroom apartment for expats is
typically more than $5,000 per month in Tokyo, according to data from
EuroCost International. While visitors need more pocket money here than
in any other city, the monthly consumer price index in Tokyo’s wards
has actually dropped year-on-year for 14 straight months as of May
2010, based on figures from Japan‘s statistics bureau.
2. Oslo, Norway

austin.jpg

Rank in 2009: 8

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$43
Can of beer from grocer:
$4.71
One kg of rice: $5.66
One dozen
eggs:
$6.72

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$16

Appliances: Washing machine: $880

Oslo rose above Copenhagen as the most expensive city in Europe when
the kroner strengthened against other currencies. ECA International
says an upward trend in oil prices, a short recession, and Norway’s
reputation as a safe haven for investors contributed to the kroner’s
rise.
3. Luanda, Angola

dallas.jpg

Rank in 2009: 1

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$47
Can of beer from grocer:
$1.62
One kg of rice: $4.73
One dozen
eggs:
$4.75

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$13

Appliances: Washing machine: $912

Angola’s capital slipped to third place this year as the kwanza
depreciated. Prices in Luanda have actually increased in the past year,
but currency changes offset any inflation, according to ECA
International. In addition to everyday goods, EuroCost International
estimates that the average expat pays more than $3,500 per month for a
two-bedroom flat in Luanda.
4. Nagoya, Japan

minn.jpg

Rank in 2009: 3

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$19
Can of beer from grocer:
$3.08
One kg of rice: $9.14
One dozen
eggs:
$3.33

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$20

Appliances: Washing machine: $621

Japan’s fourth most populous city, Nagoya is also among the country’s
most expensive. The city ranks No. 1 for the cost of rice: $9.14 per
kilogram, according to ECA International data. As Japan’s auto hub, the
Nagoya area is an important center of business: about 44 percent of
automobiles produced in Japan are made here, according to the Greater
Nagoya Initiative Center. Such companies as Toyota, Honda, Suzuki,
Mitsubishi, Volkswagen, and General Motors have headquarters,
manufacturing operations, or distribution points in the Nagoya region.
5. Yokohama, Japan

houston.jpg

Rank in 2009: 4

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$17.39
Can of beer from grocer:
$3.26
One kg of rice: $6.54
One dozen
eggs:
$3.72

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$19.50

Appliances: Washing machine: $630

About half an hour by commuter train from Tokyo, this port city has
active shipping, biotechnology, and semiconductor industries. Yokohama
is one of the world’s most expensive cities, but companies here enjoy
lower operating costs compared with the nearby capital. Nissan opened a
new headquarters in Yokohama this year and reportedly will sell its
office in Tokyo to cut costs.
6. Stavanger, Norway

dc.jpg

Rank in 2009: 14

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$33
Can of beer from grocer:
$4.76
One kg of rice: $5.71
One dozen
eggs:
$6.34

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$15.50

Appliances: Washing machine: $749

This small seaside city earned its riches from oil in the North Sea
and has become known as Norway’s petroleum capital. Stavangerexpats.com
says food expenses in Norway are about 50 percent higher than the EU
average: A can of soda is about $2.80, and a beer at a bar can be $12.
7. Kobe, Japan

austin.jpg

Rank in 2009: 6

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$16
Can of beer from grocer:
$3.09
One kg of rice: $8.57
One dozen
eggs:
$2.81

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$20

Appliances: Washing machine: $470

The city has one of Japan’s largest ports and has become home to many
heavy machinery, iron and steel, and food product companies. According
to the Japan External Trade Organization, 117 foreign and
foreign-affiliated companies have offices in Kobe. As the price of Kobe
beef, the style of high-grade meat named after the city, suggests,
food is costly here, as are other living expenses.
8. Copenhagen, Denmark

dallas.jpg

Rank in 2009: 7

Food: Lunch at
a restaurant:
$36
Can of beer from grocer:
$2.10
One kg of rice: $4.85
One dozen
eggs:
$6.99

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$15

Appliances: Washing machine: $1,196

A 2009 “survey” of 73 international cities by UBS found that employees
in Copenhagen have the highest income. Places with higher salaries
often have higher prices, but residents here enjoy good living
standards overall. Some examples of the cost of living: Renting a DVD
costs about $8 per night, a pair of women’s jeans is more than $150,
and a one-way ticket on public transport costs about $3.70.
9. Geneva, Switzerland

minn.jpg

Rank in 2009: 9

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$30
Can of beer from grocer:
$2.02
One kg of rice: $3.81
One dozen
eggs:
$7.64

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$16

Appliances: Washing machine: $1,304

Geneva, home to many companies and U.N. organizations, is one of the
most expensive cities for food and household appliances. Food prices in
Switzerland are 45 percent more expensive than in the rest of Western
Europe, and the cost of electronics and appliances in Geneva is among
the highest worldwide, according to a 2009 UBS report.
10. Zurich, Switzerland

houston.jpg

Rank in 2009: 10

Food: Lunch at a
restaurant:
$25
Can of beer from grocer:
$2.01
One kg of rice: $3.36
One dozen
eggs:
$5.81

Entertainment: Movie ticket:
$16

Appliances: Washing machine: $974

Zurich, Switzerland’s largest city, is the country’s main business
center and the headquarters city for many financial companies,
including UBS and Credit Suisse. Although Zurich had the greatest
number of company bankruptcies in Switzerland last year, according to
Dun & Bradstreet, the inflation rate started to increase again this
year after falling in 2009.
//

Click
here to see the full list of the World’s Most Expensive Cities 2010



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Lady Gaga’s Birkin Bags Are Cooler Than Yours via [Styleite, ThatVice, and Fashionista]

The fashion world just had a heart attack—again. It wasn’t enough for
Lady Gaga to stop hearts when she scribbled on her white Hermès Birkin
with a black marker. This time, the pop singer has been photographed
toting around a haphazardly studded Birkin. In an industry where the
Birkin is worshipped and the five-figure bags often have a waitlist,
this is tantamount to sacrilege. Source 

We suppose if you’re Lady Gaga, just owning an Hermes
Birkin
bag isn’t interesting enough — you have to do crrrraaaaazy
things like doodle
on it
or, we don’t know, attack it with a nail gun.

While last time she customized her Birkin we wondered
if Gaga meant it as some sort of commentary on the superficiality and
impermanence of fashion, but this time around we think she did it just
because it looks cool. Good for her.

Say it ain’t so. On a recent trip to
Tokyo, always one to raise eyebrows, Lady Gaga, took her antics to a
new extreme. The pop star stepped out in an Hermes Birkin bag, you know
— the $5,000 purse with a mile-long waiting list – that she had
scribbled all over with a black marker. The writings read “I love small
monster, Tokyo love.” Background – Gaga refers to her fans as
“monsters.” We’re wondering if there’s more to the antic than meets the
eye – perhaps a statement on how ludicrous the fashion industry is?

Terence Koh Defaced Lady Gaga’s Birkin


These pictures, “courtesy of
Terence Koh,” show the artist going to town on Lady Gaga’s white
Birkin last week. Whether the initial scribbles came from Gaga or Koh we’re not
sure, but he managed to cover the rest of the bag with Japanese
characters. It should be noted, however, that his own remained
pristine. Another shot, after the jump.




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STYLE DEFICIT DISORDER: HARAJUKU STREET FASHION – TOKYO by Tiffany Godoy

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Style Deficit Disorder

Harajuku
Street Fashion—Tokyo
By Tiffany Godoy
Edited
by Ivan Vartanian

Style Deficit Disorder: Harajuku Street Fashion - TokyoStyle
Deficit Disorder: Harajuku Street Fashion – Tokyo
by Tiffany Godoy
Buy new: $11.98 / Used
from: $15.37
Usually ships in 24
hours

Style
Deficit Disorder

Style Deficit Disorder — The Harajuku neighborhood of Tokyo has
become an international style mecca, a street-level fashion scene
prowled by major designers looking for inspiration, and whose local,
cutting-edge labels enjoy global cache. Style Deficit Disorder
is the first book to explore this remixed, fast-forward fashion hotbed,
profiling its most daring and influential designers, labels, stylists,
and shops (including Comme des Garçons, Hysteric Glamour, Super Lovers, A
Bathing Ape, and Laforet). Featuring nearly 200 photos, essays by key
Japanese fashion editors, and commentary by Edison Chen, Patricia Field,
John Galliano, Shawn Stussy, Shu Uemura and others, this is a
must-have, insider’s look at an international fashion and pop culture
epicenter, past, present, and future.

Tiffany Godoy is a contributor to V and Vogue Nippon
and former fashion editor at Japanese culture magazines Composite
and Studio Voice. She lives in Tokyo.

Quotes

Style Deficit Disorder is an awesome encyclopedic breakdown
of [Harajuku]..” —The Fader

“essential reading for anyone who wants to get the real lowdown on
the fabled district.” —Japan Times

My FAVE 3 Ultra-Modern Cities of the World via [RatesToGo]

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Three Most Futuristic Cities

posted by: E Choon

There are only two ways of looking at the future; bright and spectacular or gloomy and horrible. Most of us would prefer a spectacular image, straight out of a sci-fi movie. Thankfully, even today some cities are working hard towards that great future and definitely deserve our commendations. The top three cities that make the cut as the most futuristic cities of today are Tokyo, Hong Kong and Dubai.

Tokyo

Ultra modern, with busy streets 24/7 and skyscrapers that puncture the sky, Tokyo is one of the most futuristic cities on earth. They make extensive use of technological advances, from internet, to electric toilets. They boast the fastest railway system in the world; their Bullet train can move up to 300 mph. Even anime has used this city to depict the future. Check out some of the Tokyo hotel deals for a wild time in Japan’s most modern city.

Night Tokyo

Tokyo from above

Tokyo Tower

Hong Kong

With skyscrapers that defy description, and neon lights flashing everywhere, Hong Kong is the next on our futuristic destinations list. The city makes use of a tram network with a smart card system to make travel from points in the city faster and more efficient, whether public or private. The beauty of the city and the unique skyline are hard to match, even the roads network looks out of this world. With one of the worlds best airports, built 16 miles out to sea and buildings which will definitely make you wonder which century you are in, Hong Kong is an amazing place to be.

Hong Kong City

Hong Kong night

World Trade Center Hong Kong

Dubai

Dubai Burj Al Arab

Lastly, Dubai is the one that definitely looks nothing like any city anyone has seen before. The city doesn?t do anything on a small scale. They are currently in the process of building the first underwater hotel, and the houses at their marina are not only modern, but the design used to build looks like something straight out of the Waterworld. Add the unusually shaped buildings and busy city life, and you could definitely be looking at our future.

They have one of the world’s first ever built 7 star hotels called Burj Al Arab Hotel.

beach hotel Dubai


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The World’s Coolest Kiddie Playgrounds via [Mental_Floss]

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10 Unusual Playgrounds From Around the World by David K. Israel

Playgrounds have come a long way since the days of hot, steel slides and open-backed infant swings. Take a look at some of the many unusually cool designs popping up around the world.

1. Nishi-Rokugo – Tokyo, Japan

strange_place_03

In Japanese, Nishi-Rokugo means Tire Park. The Kawasaki plants are located not far away, so it’s possible they donated the 3,000 tires that make up the dinosaurs, monsters, bridges, slides, swings, and all the loose ones there for kids to stack and hop on. But this sand-bottom park is hardly just for kids. Parents can haul tires up specially designed tire steps and tube down wide concrete slides. I can imagine it’s the type of place you can spend hours at before you, er, tire, of it.
strange_place_01

2. The Fruit and Scent Playground –Liljeholmen, Sweden

A banana slide, strawberry spinners, a pair of cherry swings, an orange see-saw and a watermelon jungle gym are all part of this unusual, small park in the south of Stockholm. It’s a great theme because it also teaches kids the importance of fruit over junk food. Reports coming out of the country indicate that the outdoors-loving Swede is on the way out. According to a study by Karolinska university hospital, obesity among seven year olds in Stockholm has increased from 8.5% to 21% over the last fifteen years. What could be better than exercising in fruit as an antidote?

df-pears-440
df-watermelondf-banana-slide

3. Clemyjontri Park – Fairfax County, Virginia

playground1

Not just the name is unusual at Clemyjontri Park in Fairfax County, Virginia. This place is one of the few playgrounds in the world where children with disabilities can play side-by-side those without. The entire park is equipped with ramps for wheelchairs and the ground surfaces are specially designed with a non-slip material. The park is named for Adele Lebowitz’s (a major donor) four children: Carolyn (CL), Emily (EMY), John (Jon), and Petrina (Tri). Mrs. Lebowitz and her husband were also sponsors of a local children’s television show, The Pick Temple Show, in the 1950s. The star of that show, a clown named Bozo, was played by Willard Scott. Bozo, as you might know, would later morph into Ronald McDonald.

4. Pruessen Park – Berlin, Germany

GERMANY-ELDERLY-PLAYGROUND

This next playground is not for kids at all. In fact, anyone under 16 is not allowed inside Berlin’s Pruessen Park, nicknamed the “Playground for Grown-Ups.” The equipment is specifically designed for people over five feet tall and caters to Germany’s fastest growing age demographic: seniors. The idea, obviously, is to encourage them to get out and exercise more.
GERMANY-ELDERLY-PLAYGROUND

5. Zabeel Technology Park – Dubai

Picture 3

Perhaps the first playground in the world with a technology theme, Dubai’s Zabeel Technology Park has two zones featuring futuristic technology and alternative energy exhibits, a series of high tech interactive displays, and a maze modeled on the solar system.

AE-Dubai-ZabeelPark1

6. Takino Hillside Park – Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido, Japan

The Children’s Playground in the Takino Hillside Park in Japan borrows ideas and images from nature. Varied lighting and sound conditions create a unique sensory experience for kids, unlike anything else on this list. Check out the cool net play tool in the rainbow nest dome. You can see how a lot of the park is built into, and under the hill.
1

4

7. St. Kilda Adventure Playground – Adelaide, Australia

1104-adventure

St Kilda Adventure Playground is one of Australia’s best known parks and covers 4 hectares along the beautiful South Australian seafront. The park was opened in 1982 and recent upgrades include a wooden castle, a small maze, and a submarine, nicknamed “The Yellow Submarine.” But the park’s biggest attraction is the beached pirate shipwreck, which is especially popular with dolphins and other sea wildlife.

8. Teardrop Park – New York City, NY

park.184.1.650

Located between residential buildings in Battery Park City, Teardrop Park is unlike anything else in NYC. Built for a whopping $17 million, the park features prominent rock outcroppings, geologic formations, a secret path, a bluestone ice wall, a humongous, almost dangerous looking slide, sandboxes, water play areas, a reading space with rock seats, and places to rock hop. Best of all, because it’s not so easy to find, Teardrop Park is a real insiders secret. (Shhhhh.)
teardrop_park_slide

9. Yerba Gardens – San Francisco, California

sanfran

It may sound like an unsafe setting, but the rooftop at Yerba Gardens in San Francisco is home to one of the most elaborate playgrounds ever constructed. Aside from the ice-skating rink, bowling center and the 130,000 square feet of open space to play in, the playground includes a beautiful 103-year-old hand carved carousel. The Zeum carousel was constructed in 1906 but could not be installed in San Francisco as originally planned because of earthquake issues. It was eventually housed at Luna Park in Seattle, where it was the only piece of equipment to survive a horrific 1911 fire. The city of San Francisco bought the carousel from a collector in 1998 and restored it to its original condition. It now serves at the centerpiece in Yerba Gardens
sanfran1

10. Playground – Boadilla del Monte, Spain

boadilla_4

Spanish architects Eduardo Navadijos and Csaba Tarsoly designed this stunning modern playground with the intention of giving children inspiration to pursue their dreams in an airy and cool environment. I’ve never been to Madrid, a mere 30 minutes drive from Boadilla del Monte, but when I do finally get there, this playground is my first stop.
boadilla_3



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The Most Expensive Hotels around the Globe. via [WSJ]

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Diplomats Help Boost Rates at World’s Most Expensive Hotels

by Tara Loader Wilkinson

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Starwood Hotels
The
Royal Penthouse Suite at the President Wilson Hotel in Geneva commands
$65,000 a night for its four-bedroom penthouse.

Amid the recession, rock stars, diplomats and other celebrities find
solace from the doom and gloom by spending their time in sanctuary
provided by the world’s most luxurious, and expensive, hotels. While
many of us are tightening our belts, shortening our summer holidays or
even abandoning them, hoteliers to the rich and famous claim to have no
trouble filling their most exclusive accommodations, and in the case of
the most expensive suite in the world, managing to double its rate to
$65,000 (€45,642) a night.

In an annual survey by Financial News’ sister publication Wealth
Bulletin, the Royal Penthouse Suite at the President Wilson Hotel in
Geneva, Switzerland, tops the list as the most expensive hotel room in
2009, commanding $65,000 for its four-bedroom penthouse — twice as much
as patrons paid a year ago for its luxurious setting and views of Lake
Geneva and Mont Blanc.

The hotel’s management puts the rise down to “buoyant demand” from
government officials and U.N. diplomats.

Last year’s winner, the iconic Ty Warner Penthouse at the Four
Seasons Hotel in New York, came second this time, at $35,000, $1,000 up
from last year.

New entries this year were the third-placed Presidential Suite at the
Hotel Cala di Volpe in Sardinia, the Villa La Cupola Suite at the
Westin Excelsior in Rome and the Presidential Suite at the Ritz-Carlton
in Tokyo.

Despite the past year’s financial and economic turmoil, prices at the
best hotel suites have risen by an average of 10% this year. Herbert
Ypma, founder of the Hip Hotels brand, said: “The very high end hasn’t
suffered all that much. A lot of hotels used to having upmarket
clientele are getting the benefit of them taking far more time off than
usual — so they have more time to stay in hotels. Money was never the
issue, time was.”

Hoteliers said that although the number of business travellers has
fallen in the past year, government officials have taken their place in
the best rooms and suites.

President Barack Obama and his entourage took over the entire
Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Moscow for three nights in June. The President
Wilson Hotel said heads of state and other high-level government
officials are fuelling demand for its hugely expensive Royal Penthouse
Suite.

Vivian Deuschl, spokeswoman for Ritz-Carlton Hotels, said demand is
also coming from wealthy leisure travellers: “Last year they might have
taken three or four cheaper holidays. This year they are taking one big
vacation, but pulling out all the stops.”

The 10 most expensive hotel suites according to Wealth Bulletin’s
survey for 2009 are:


Four Seasons
The
library of the Ty Warner Penthouse at New York’s Four Seasons Hotel.

1. The Royal Penthouse Suite, President Wilson Hotel, Geneva
— $65,000 per night

Complete with a cocktail lounge, the Royal Penthouse Suite at the
President Wilson is so exclusive that bookings reportedly have to be
made through the hotel’s chairman. The suite occupies the entire top
floor of the hotel. It is reached by a private elevator, has four
bedrooms overlooking Lake Geneva and Mont Blanc and comes with six
bathrooms. Equipped with bulletproof windows and doors, it is almost
exclusively reserved for celebrities or state heads, ideal with the
United Nations headquarters a five-minute drive away.

2. Ty Warner Penthouse, Four Seasons Hotel, New York —
$35,000 per night

Business at the Ty Warner Penthouse at the Four Seasons Hotel in New
York has remained as buoyant as when the suite opened in 2007, according
to a spokeswoman. The nine-room suite has walls inlaid with thousands
of pieces of mother-of-pearl. There is an indoor-outdoor Zen garden, a
private spa room with a screen of living bamboo and a book-lined
library, which has a grand piano at its centre.

3. The Presidential Suite, Hotel Cala di Volpe, Costa
Smeralda, Sardinia — $34,000 per night

The Presidential Suite at Hotel Cala di Volpe near Porto Cervo,
averages around $34,000 a night, although during the peak summer season
will cost as much as $45,000. Located in the hotel tower, the
multi-level Presidential Suite sprawls across 2,500 sq ft and has three
bedrooms, three bathrooms, a private gym, a steam room and a wine
cellar. It is crowned by a rooftop terrace with an outdoor saltwater
swimming pool.

4. Villa La Cupola Suite, Westin Excelsior, Rome — $31,000
per night

Villa La Cupola Suite in Rome’s Westin Excelsior embodies all things
Roman and excessive: a cupola, a Pompeii-style Jacuzzi, frescoes and
stained glass windows detailing allegories of a mythological figure
paired with a modern one, such as Atlas and Television, Hypnosis and
Neurosis, Hermes and Marketing and Hermaphrodite and Fashion. Located on
the fifth and sixth floors, the suite covers 6,099 sq ft and has an
additional 1,808 sq ft of balconies and terraces overlooking Via Veneto.


Ritz-Carlton
The
Presidential Suite at Tokyo’s Ritz-Carlton.

5. The Presidential Suite, Ritz-Carlton Tokyo — $25,000 per
night

The Presidential Suite, on the top floor of the city’s tallest
building, has spectacular views of Mount Fuji and Roppongi Hills, as
well as an expansive vista of Tokyo’s impressive cityscape. It occupies
2,368 sq ft. For refreshments, guests may enjoy the $18,000
Diamonds-Are-Forever Martini, which comes with a one-karat Bulgari
diamond at the bottom.

6. The Bridge Suite, The Atlantis, Bahamas — $22,000 per
night

The 10-room Bridge Suite is actually a bridge spanning the two towers
of the Atlantis Hotel. The 23rd-floor suite is decked with marble
floors, a grand piano and a 22-carat gold chandelier. It was known in
former times as “the Michael Jackson Suite” because of his regular
stays. Prices have come down from $25,000 last year and fees are
negotiable. Nevertheless, the suite is so exclusive the hotel does not
even advertise it.

7. The Imperial Suite, Park Hyatt Vendôme, Paris — $20,000
per night

The Imperial Suite at the Park Hyatt in Paris provides guests with an
“in-suite-spa” concept — with the bathroom/spa comprising a whirlpool
bath, a steam shower room and a massage table. The 2,500 sq ft penthouse
suite has a huge living room, a dining room, a kitchen and a work area.


Burj Al Arab
The
Royal Suite at the Burj Al Arab in Dubai.

8. Royal Suite, Burj Al Arab, Dubai — $19,600 per night

Since it was built in the mid-1990s, the Burj Al Arab has become one
of the world’s most instantly recognizable hotels with its billowing
sail-like structure stretching out on an artificial island into the Gulf
of Arabia. The Royal Suite on the 25th floor has a marble-and-gold
staircase, leopard print carpets, its own private lift and a rotating
four-poster canopy bed.

9. Royal Armleder Suite, Le Richemond, Geneva — $18,900 per
night

The Royal Armleder Suite at the Le Richemond Hotel is named after the
wealthy family who used to own the famous hotel before Rocco Forte
bought it in August 2004. The three-bedroom suite, which stretches over
2,500 sq ft on the seventh floor, has a 1,000 sq ft terrace with
panoramic views of Lake Geneva, a real log fire and floor-to-ceiling
bulletproof windows. Olga Polizzi, Rocco Forte’s sister and well-known
hotel interior designer, designed the suite.

10. The Ritz-Carlton Suite, The Ritz-Carlton, Moscow —
$16,500 per night

To stay at the best suite in Moscow’s Ritz-Carlton would cost around
$16,000 a night — $500 less than last year. Furnished in Russian
imperial style, the 2,370 sq ft suite has views of famous Moscow sites
including the Kremlin and Red Square. The suite comes with that
necessity for the security-conscious Russian billionaire — a panic room
with its own energy and telecommunications facilities.

Research for this survey was compiled during mid-August. Prices are
rate per night including taxes.

From Financial News at http://www.efinancialnews.com


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