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Archive for Parenting

OPULUXE Lifestyle Design™ Quick& Decadent Last- Minute Father’s Day Gifts

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Last-minute Father’s Day luxury gifts  via LibertyLuxuo, and Elite Traveler

Father’s Day is almost upon us, but there’s still time to make sure your Dad’s day is extra special. We’ve picked out the most luxurious of gifts that he’s sure to love, find something perfect for your pop now in our Father’s Day Shop. Or if he’s a true adventurer at heart, treat him with our ultimate travellers gifts…

1. Globe, £120

2. Airplane Desk Accessory by Troika, £27

3. Wicker iPhone Sleeve by Liberty London for Apple, £50

4. Places to Remember Notebook by Leathersmith of London, £30.50

5. Leather Weekend Bag by Calabrese, £515

6. Facial Fuel Moisturiser by Kiehl’s, £30.50

Spinning Blue Globe Facial Fuel by Kiehl's Silver Airplane Desk Accessory iPhone Cover Leather Doctor's Bag Places to Remember

FitFolio iPad Case 468x353 Last minute Fathers Day travel gifts

Father’s Day is celebrated in many countries around the world June 19, meaning there’s less than a week to pick something to show you really care. Here a selection of some of our favorite guy-friendly items.

Kodak Playsport G2

Launched in January this year, the Playsport G2 is purpose-built for Dads who want to capture the action, no matter where they are.

Capture photos and HD videos using the compact unit, safe in the knowledge that it’s water-, dust- and shock-proof.

£149.99/$149.95/€179.99 – http://www.kodak.com

Otis Batterbee Luxury Travel Pillow

Sleep in comfort and style when on the go with these luxury travel pillow from Otis Batterbee.

Finished in three deluxe soft wool fabrics, patterns available include Prince of Wales Check, Grey Pinstripe and Mono Spot, with a burgundy velvet backing.

£75/€95/$125 – http://www.otisbatterbee.com

Otis Batterbee Travel Pillow 468x379 Last minute Fathers Day travel gifts

BlackBerry Playbook

Available in the US since April, BlackBerry’s PlayBook makes its debut in Europe this month, launching in the UK June 16.

The 425 gram tablet is ideal for busy travelers and is available with a host of exclusive accessories, but make sure to preload it with the Blackberry Travel app.

From £399/$499 – http://www.blackberry.com

Bottega Veneta Nero Intecciato VN Credit Card Case

With six slots and an open compartment, this unisex luxury credit card case is perfect for traveling light and staying organized.

Available in black or brown – $240/£145 – http://www.bottegaveneta.com

Weber Q100

Enable Dad to take the BBQ anywhere with the Weber Q100 mobile grill.

With built-in carry-handles and thermometer, a fold-out table and push-button ignition, it’s perfect for chefs with a sense of adventure.

Rolling carry cases are available separately.

$159/€214 – http://www.weber.com

The BlackBerry PlayBook 468x373 Last minute Fathers Day travel gifts

Redfoot Men’s Shoes

Redfoot’s patented folding shoes have already proved a hit with women, but the brand’s split-sole Redfoot Man loafers are also ideal for the gent who likes to travel light.

The shoes are available in Seal Black and Chestnut Brown and come with a lightweight nylon wallet for easy storage.

£110/€165/$176 – http://www.redfootman.com

FitFolio iPad Case

Speck’s FitFolio adds rear-protection to the iPad2 while maintaining all of the smart cover functionality, making it perfect for toughening the ever-popular tablet.

Available in Black, Red and Grey.

£32.95/€39.95/$39.95 – http://www.speckproducts.com

Bear Grylls Ultimate Tool

Good enough for the king of adventures himself, the Ultimate Tool features 12 components and a texturized rubber handle for comfort.

The six inch ‘king of tools’ includes needle nose pliers, a fine edge knife, two screwdrivers, a bottle opener, a saw and a pair of wire cutters.

£49.99 – http://www.firebox.com / $57.99 – http://bear.gerbergear.com

Rosetta Stone Version 4 TOTALe

An unusual but surprisingly satisfying gift, Rosetta Stone’s language courses allow students to learn a new language quickly and easily.

The latest version of the award-winning software is available in over 20 languages from Arabic to Turkish and comes with a free iPad app for learning on the move.

From £139/$179 – http://www.rosettastone.com

Redfoot Man 468x553 Last minute Fathers Day travel gifts

vodka
Want to really spoil your dad on Father’s Day? Ready to shell out at least a grand to do it? Elite Traveler has a list of extravagant gifts that should wow even the worldliest of dads. Why would an ice pick cost $200,000? Why if it’s made of white gold, diamonds and sapphires, of course! This Belvedere’s Jagger Dagger is available at Harrod’s of London. (Elite Traveler)
lamborghini
Dad doesn’t have to own a car to get a thrill from driving it. One sure-fire way to get his heart racing is to enroll him in World Class Driving. In the program, which is held across the country, students spend $1,495 for a day of learning how to rule the road in speed machines like this Lamborghini Gallardo Spyder. (Elite Traveler)
corkscrew
If Dad likes to open wine bottles with style, consider a monogrammed, jewel-encrusted corkscrew from Gershon Ltd. Made with everything from warthog tusk to diamonds, these fancy wine openers start at about $2,000. (Elite Traveler)
poker
If your father likes card games, this present isn’t much of a gamble: This ebony Poke Box, by Ghiso, is lined with velvet calf leather and includes more than 200 chips made of various woods. But you might have to win big to afford this gift — it costs $4,250. (Elite Traveler)
tequila
Why take Dad out for drinks when you can stay in with some high-class tequila? Billed as the ultimate gift for tequila connoisseurs, The 1800 Coleccion Anejo comes from agaves aged at least 10 years and is served in a pewter decanter designed by Mexican artist Alejandro Colunga. It sells for $1,800. (Elite Traveler)
lighter
Even if Dad’s a macho guy, he might not mind a pink gift — especially if it’s this pink gold, palladium and brass lighter by S.T. Dupont. It sells for $870. (Elite Traveler)
flexjet
If Dad’s not a fan of commercial airliners and you’ve got more than $100,000 to burn, consider this Flexjet25 Card from Bombardier. It comes with 25, 30 or 35 hours of flight time onboard a fleet of Challengers and Learjets. Prices for the cards start at about $120,000. (Elite Traveler)
roadster
A father who wants to curb his carbon footprint while burning up the road might be fond of this battery-powered Tesla Roadster. The $100,000 luxury car goes from 0 to 60 mph in less than four seconds. (Elite Traveler)
iwc
A father and son with matching tastes might desire matching timepieces, like these IWC Pilot’s Watches. A set of two watches, one platinum and one steel, sells for $49,000. (Elite Traveler)
jeanrichard
A partnership between Swiss watchmaker Jean Richard and Italian racing motorcycle company MV Agusta has produced the MV 75 World Champion Collection timepieces. The watches, which are made in gold, titanium or steel, sell for between $8,000 and $21,500. (Elite Traveler)

Tags: #Liberty, #Luxuo, #Elite Traveler,#Luxury Father’s Day Gifts,#Father’sDay 2011,

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BOOK REVIEW: Smart Girls Marry Money:”How Women Have Been Duped Into The Romantic Dream–And How They’re Paying For It” by Elizabeth Ford and Daniela Drake via [Marie Claire and ABC.com]

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The Feminist Gold Digger

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Smart Girls Marry Money: How Women Have Been Duped Into the  <br/>Romantic Dream--And How They're Paying For ItSmart
Girls Marry Money: How Women Have Been Duped Into the Romantic
Dream–And How They’re Paying For It
by Elizabeth
Ford

Buy new: $7.18 / Used from: $6.38

Usually ships in 24 hours

Elizabeth Ford and Daniela Drake — an Emmy-winning news
producer and an M.D., respectively — are no bimbos. And yet, they’ve
written what sounds like a bimbo bible. In a chatty, if bitter, tone, Smart
Girls Marry Money: How Women Have Been Duped Into the Romantic Dream —
And How They’re Paying for It
makes the case against marrying for
love. We couldn’t resist a few words with the authors.

Smart Girls Marry Money: How Women Have Been Duped Into the <br/>Romantic Dream--And How They're Paying For It

MC:
You’re both accomplished working women, but you’re telling us
we should marry for money. What gives?
FORD:
The juggling
act required to be a successful woman, to be a good mom and to be a
careerist, makes you want to say, “Screw it, I should’ve married money.”

MC: So you’re saying we should quit our careers?
FORD:
You should definitely keep your job. But we haven’t climbed
the ladder as far as we should have. We have to keep that in mind when
looking for a partner, and steer clear of seductive slackers.

MC:
But what about all the gains we’ve made in the workplace?
DRAKE:
You
can always find a poster girl who earns more than a man. But the
average woman earns one-third of what a man earns over the course of her
working life.

MC: Did you two marry for love?
DRAKE:
I did. And I’ve been happily married for 10 years.
FORD:
I married the love of my life when I was 26 years old. Now I’m
a single mom, and he’s engaged to a girl 15 years younger than me.

MC:
Oy, that sounds tricky.
FORD:
I was with my husband for 13
years, and then he wasn’t in love with me anymore. The bitterness is
there.

MC: Thus the book’s premise?
FORD:
It’s
meant to be funny. It’s meant to be catty. It’s meant to be a good
read. The title gets people’s attention. You picked it up, didn’t you?

Smart Women Marry Rich, Says New Book

Why Do Women Choose ‘Big Blue Eyes’ Over ‘Big Green Bank
Account?’

By SUSAN DONALDSON JAMES

June 5, 2009—

Heart-stopping, knee-weakening, “when-is-he-going-to-call” kind of
love wanes in about 18 to 24 months, but the kind that comes in dollars
and cents lasts a lifetime.

At least according to a new book, “Smart Girls Marry Money: How Women
Have Been Duped into the Romantic Dream — and How They’re Paying for
It.”

The book confirms what mothers have been telling their daughters for
generations: “Girls are told at their mother’s knee: “It’s just as easy
to love a rich man as a poor man.” Or, “No Romance without Finance.”
And, “Marry the one you can live with, not the one you can’t live
without.”

Many women would agree that one good man in the boardroom is better
than two in the bedroom.

Such was the case with Ginger Borgella, a 29-year-old Maryland
therapist who writes the blog, “Girls
Just Want To Have Funds
.”

“How a man treats his finances — if he is not willing to honor his
debts and obligations — is an indicator of how he will treat you in the
marriage,” she told ABCNews.com.

“I want a man who is financially savvy,” said Borgella, who asked to
see her prospective husband’s credit report.

That report wasn’t perfect, but the couple made a mutual plan to
establish financial security and have now been married since 2006 and
own their own house.

“I don’t want to be broke,” said Borgella. “I’m not Paris Hilton, but
I lead a comfortable life.”

“Smart Girls Marry Money” is a satirical self-help guide is written
by two middle-aged professionals scarred by their first marriages.

They aim their advice squarely at nubile girls who have falsely
equated romantic love with happiness.

Why are girls are encouraged to court the man with the “big blue
eyes” rather than the one with the “big green bankroll?” they ask.

Both authors — Los Angeles mothers Daniela Drake and Elizabeth Ford
— say they “married for love, but reaped the consequences.”

Drake is a primary care doctor with an MBA and Ford (divorced from
the son of actor Harrison Ford) is an Emmy-winning television producer.

Ford admits the book’s title is “meant to get your attention.”

“It’s not just about how to marry a rich guy,” she told ABCNews.com.
But women are way too obsessed with the “love drug.”

The question women should ask about the fiance is, “Does he have a
financial plan and how does that match up with your values?”

Romantic love, they say, is never a valid reason to get married.

“Both men and women think it is the end-all, be-all of happiness,”
said Ford. “Every movie ends with the wedding scene and a pregnant girl
at the end and they live happily ever after.”

Science seems to back this theory. MRI scans now reveal a
“complicated biological cocktail of hormones” that light up in the brain
when people are in love, according to the book. And, Ford notes, the
activity is in “the most primitive, reptilian” part of the brain.

Knowing that that loving feeling doesn’t last and that women have a
“sell-by date,” women should pursue the “gold digging imperative” —
finding a man while they still have their youth and looks.

“I am just old fashioned enough to find [marrying for money]
repellant,” said Stephanie Coontz, professor of history and family
studies at Evergreen State College in Washington.

Still, she notes that romantic love is a modern notion.

According to her 2005 book, “Marriage, A History: From Obedience to
Intimacy, or How Love Conquered Marriage,” it began in the Victorian
era.

“There is nothing new about this idea,” Coontz told ABCNews.com.
“Women have been marrying for mercenary reasons for most of history.
They had to, because they couldn’t support themselves.”

She said that as late as 1967, women routinely considered marrying a
man they didn’t love “if he met the financial criteria.”

For thousands of years, marriage was based on political and economic
convenience for both men and women.

“Until the 18th century the biggest infusion of cash until marriage
was death and an inheritance,” said Coontz. Next was the dowry.

“Families were interested in the connections to in-laws to improve
their financial interests,” she said.

But as the middle class emerged and men could support themselves
rather than depend upon an inheritance, they became “the most
exuberantly romantic,” she said.

“Women who were totally dependent and legally subordinate said things
in their diaries like, “Caution: My heart inclines to Harry, but I
can’t take that risk.”

By the mid 20th century, modern attitudes gave men and
women equality to choose a mate, but not economic equality.

Men expect power because they make more money and women “trade
services for deference,” Coontz said. “This has created an unstable
situation.”

The best hope for a stable and satisfying marriage is one where both
husband and wife share the bread-winning, child care and housework,
according to Coontz.

“Women mostly say it is less important to have a man earn a lot of
money than a man who can communicate and share his feelings,” she said.
“And that doesn’t mean they want to marry a deadbeat.”

The book’s authors agree that economic equality is important.

They argue that women can’t earn as much as men, especially after
having children, and if they do marry well, and then split, they are
shortchanged by divorce, both professionally and financially.

The book cites research by Professor Stephen Jenkins, director of the
Institute for Social and Economic Research, who found that five years
after divorce, men were 25 percent richer, whereas women still had less
money than they did pre-split; and that 31 percent of mothers received
no support no payment for children.

Women face the pressure to do it all — raise children, earn a decent
salary and be a hot sexpot in bed.

And, the authors note from personal experience that 50 percent of all
marriages are doomed to failure.

“If falling in love is a valid reason to get married, then falling
out of love is a reason for divorce,” said Ford, whose husband left her
two years ago to raise their now 8-year-old son, motivating her to write
the book.

Ford’s enthusiasm for the topic was also fueled by a younger sister
who graduated from college “looking for love” and ended up with “slacker
guys who don’t pay the rent.”

Her co-author, Drake, left her husband, because he had no concern for
the couple’s finances. She is now remarried with two children.

A good marriage, they both say, is an economic partnership. And
research shows that if a couple stays together long enough, the
passionate love will reignite.

Such was case with one blogger on the Web site Urban Baby who said
her best friend had always dated “rocker guys” but, instead, married a
Jewish MBA consultant.

“She admits that he is not as sexy, interesting or thrilling as her
past boys,” she wrote. “But he is understanding and kind and super
intelligent. I ‘m sure that loft in Tribeca didn’t hurt either.”