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Business Cards that DON’T Get Thrown Away. via [Quality Junkyard]

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Creative Business Cards

Creativity with Currency Notes

Creativity with Currency Notes

Creativity with Currency Notes

Creativity with Currency Notes

Creativity with Currency Notes

Creativity with Currency Notes

Creativity with Currency Notes

Creativity with Currency Notes

Creative Business Cards

Creative Business Cards

Creative Business Cards

Creative Business Cards




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The New Trophy Wives of the Top Media Moguls via [Marie Claire]

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The New Trophy Wives: Asian Women

Rupert Murdoch has one. So do financiers Vivi Nevo and Bruce Wasserstein. Why are the West’s most powerful men coupling up with younger Asian women?

Rupert Murdoch has one. So do financiers Vivi Nevo and Bruce  Wasserstein. Why are the West's most powerful men coupling up with  younger Asian women?

Call it the Woody Allen Effect. When the venerable director scandalously left Mia Farrow for her adopted daughter, South Korean-born Soon-Yi Previn — 35 years his junior — he may as well have sent out a press release: Asian-girl fantasy trumps that of Hollywood royalty!

Not two years after they tied the knot, media baron Rupert Murdoch walked down the aisle with fresh-faced Wendi Deng — 17 days after finalizing his divorce from his second wife. Then, CBS head Leslie Moonves wed TV news anchor Julie Chen; Oscar winner Nicolas Cage married half-his-age third wife Alice Kim; billionaire George Soros coupled up with violinist Jennifer Chun; and producer Brian Grazer courted concert pianist Chau-Giang Thi Nguyen. Add the nuptials of investment magnate Bruce Wasserstein to fourth wife Angela Chao and the pending vows between venture capitalist Vivi Nevo and Chinese actress Ziyi Zhang, and we’ve got a curious cultural ripple.

Were these tycoons consciously courting Asian babes? Do any of them qualify for the unnerving “yellow fever” or “rice king” moniker? It’s unsavory to think so. But after two or three failed attempts at domestic bliss with women of like background and age, these heavy hitters sought out something different. Something they had likely fetishized.

Enter the doll-faced Asian sylph on the arm of a silver-haired Western suit. (Hello, mail-order bride!) The excruciating colonial stereotypes — Asian women as submissive, domestic, hypersexual — are obviously nothing new. But decades after The World of Suzie Wong hit drive-ins and more than 20 years since David Bowie‘s “China Girl” topped the music charts, why are we still indulging them?

Because they’re omnipresent — and often entertaining. Even now, how many cinematic greats, literary best sellers, or even cell-phone ads (see Motorola’s latest) characterize Asian women as something other than geishas, ninjas, or dragon ladies? As the object of opening-line zingers like “Me love you long time” (the infamous line from Stanley Kubrick‘s Full Metal Jacket), I’m not sure whether to laugh or cry at the cheeky blog stuffwhitepeoplelike.com, which ranks Asian girls at number 11 because “Asian women avoid key white women characteristics, such as having a midlife crisis, divorce, and hobbies that don’t involve taking care of the children.” Sure, I’m petite and was in fact born in Shanghai, but — to the shock of more than one guy I’ve gone out with — I’d rather down an icy beer and burger than nurse bubble tea and eat dumplings while massaging his back with my toes.

“This is a common experience among Asian-American women,” says Bich Minh Nguyen, who broaches the stereotypes in her latest novel, Short Girls. “They’re dating a white guy, and they may not know if it’s a fetish thing.”

“It’s like a curse that Asian-American women can’t avoid,” says C.N. Le, director of Asian and Asian-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. “From an academic point of view, the perception still serves as a motivation for white men.”

In researching his new book, The East, the West, and Sex, author Richard Bernstein found that the Orientalist illusion continues to influence. “Historically, Asia provided certain sexual opportunities that would be much more difficult for Western men to have at home. But it remains a happy hunting ground for them today,” he says, citing one phenomenon in the northeastern region of Thailand called Issan, where 15 percent of marriages are between young Thai women and Western men well into their 60s.

But I suspect there’s something else about the East that’s seducing business bigwigs at this very moment: globalization. Consider that, stateside, Mandarin classes have spiked 200 percent over the past five years (apparently, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner was an early adopter; he taught Mandarin classes in his Dartmouth days), and China has claimed status as the world’s top export nation. In Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell theorizes that Asian kids’ intrinsic work ethic makes them outsmart American kids in math. (In the latest Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development international education survey, Taiwanese students were tops in math, while the U.S. placed 35th.) It’s as though these Western men are hungry for a piece of that mystical Eastern formula. As such, Asians (in addition to African orphans) are hot commodities right about now — status symbols as prized as a private Gulfstream jet or a museum wing bearing your name (neither of which goes so well with a frumpy, aging first wife).

Tellingly, most current trophies of choice are far more than exotic arm candy. They are accomplished musicians and journalists, they have Ivy League MBAs and hail from prestigious political families (Mrs. Wasserstein’s older sis is former Labor Secretary Elaine Chao). Why, then, are these women falling for rich white patriarchs? Why be a target for headline comparisons to concubines? When Wendi Deng was described as “The Yellow Peril” in a recent magazine profile, it only marginalized her achievement: As chief strategist for MySpace China, she has become central to News Corp.’s expansion into the elusive Chinese market — something Murdoch himself had attempted, and failed to do, before she came into the picture.

While I’m sure that real love and affection is sometimes the bond in these culture-crossing May-December romances, could it be that power divorcés of a certain ilk make the perfect renegade suitors for these overachieving Asian good girls — an ultimate (yet lame) attempt at rebellion? Maybe these outsized, world-class moguls are stand-ins for emotionally repressed Asian dads (one cliché that is predominantly true). Or…are these women just glorified opportunists? What’s so perverse is that while Asians have always revered their elders, sleeping with a guy old enough to be your grandfather is just creepy — in any culture.

Skepticism aside, the new trophy trend does have its benefits. We’re already seeing a positive impact on global politics, economics, and the arts: The Chinese became privy to online social networking in 2007 with the launch of MySpace China under the News Corp. umbrella; contemporary Chinese painters — including Xiaogang Zhang and Minjun Yue — have rung up nearly $400 million in sales on international art circuits since 2006, thanks to well-connected supporters like Ziyi Zhang; and almost 43 percent of international adoptions, which have more than tripled since 1990, now come out of Asian countries (more playdates for Pax and Maddox). What’s more, perhaps a proliferation of gorgeous, mixed-race, multilingual offspring (assuming a classical Mandarin tutor is on the Chen-Moonves registry) is just good for our landscape. However you look at it, one thing’s for sure: We’re going to have to get used to this new international power family — aging mogul and foxy Asian wife flaunting a double-wide with newborn and adopted Malawian tot. What’s next — the token trophy pet? I hear endangered Burmese rabbits are exceptionally cuddly.



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“BUY*OLOGY: Truth and Lies About Why We Buy” by Martin Lindstrom via [USA Today]

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‘Buyology’ offers a peek inside
buyers’ heads

Buyology: Truth and Lies About Why We BuyBuyology:
Truth and Lies About Why We Buy
by Martin
Lindstrom

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By Seth Brown, Special for USA
TODAY

Picture a mad scientist in his
laboratory, cackling with glee as he tries to unlock the secrets of the
human mind. Now, consider the unsettling possibility that the scientist
may be on to something.

Marketing expert Martin Lindstrom is that
scientist, caught up in the excitement of research in his new book, Buyology.
Lindstrom first became aware of neurological marketing research
through a Forbes magazine article, “In Search of the Buy
Button.”

The article discussed a lab in England, where a
neuroscientist teamed with a market researcher to scan the brainwaves of
subjects watching commercials. Lindstrom was thrilled that unbiased
access to the consumer brain was finally available.

A difficulty of standard marketing research,
Lindstrom says, is that people will not — or cannot — provide accurate
information about their mental states.

When asked why they prefer a brand of soft drink,
or how a warning label affects them, most people cannot give a straight
answer. This, Lindstrom says, is the great advantage of brain waves.

“They don’t waver, hold back, equivocate, cave in
to peer pressure, conceal their vanity, or say what they think the
person across the table wants to hear. … Neuroimaging could uncover
truths that a half-century of market research, focus groups and opinion
polling couldn’t come close to accomplishing.”

Two technologies were used in Lindstrom’s
studies: SST (Steady State Topography) and fMRI (functional Magnetic
Resonance Imaging). In a series of tests spanning three years and more
than 2,000 subjects, he concluded:

  • Warning labels on cigarettes don’t work. They
    stimulate activity in the part of a smoker’s brain linked to cravings.
  • Traditional advertisements no longer create lasting
    impressions.
    By age 66, most people with a TV will have seen
    nearly 2 million commercials. That makes it hard for an ad to increase a
    viewer’s memory of a brand, despite the millions spent.
  • Product placement only works when fully integrated. It
    works when Coke-bottle-shaped furniture is part of the set design on American
    Idol
    , for example, or when Reese’s Pieces candy was used for bait
    in the movie E.T. However, when a product is not integrated,
    such as FedEx packages appearing in the background of Casino Royale,
    there is no measurable effect with regard to viewer recollection of
    brand.
  • Sex sells itself. Viewers of sexually suggestive
    ads did pay attention, but more to the sex than the ad. In one study,
    fewer than 1-in-10 men who saw a sexually suggestive ad could recall the
    product, while twice as many remembered the product in non-sexually
    suggestive ads.
  • Successful branding functions like religion. Simple
    rituals, such as putting a lime wedge in a Corona or slowly pouring a
    Guinness, give the brand added cachet. Brands attract zealous followers —
    “I’m a Mac; I’m a PC.” Scans using fMRI technology showed that some
    viewers had the same neurological response to strong brands that they
    did to religious iconography.
  • Subliminal advertising can be highly effective. When
    watching an advertisement, viewers automatically raise their guard
    against its message. With subliminal advertisements, viewers’ guards are
    down, so their responses are more direct.
  • Marketing isn’t restricted to the visual. Many
    companies use smells to sell products. Fast-food restaurants and
    supermarket bakeries use artificial fresh-cooked food smells. Sounds
    also effect buying. A study showed shoppers purchased French or German
    wine depending on which nationality’s music was playing on store
    speakers.

Lindstrom’s research should be of interest to any
company launching a new product or brand. “Eight out of 10 products
launched in the United States are destined to fail,” Lindstrom writes.
“Roughly 21,000 new brands are introduced worldwide per year, yet
history tells us that more than 90% of them are gone from the shelf a
year later.”

It’s likely that the information in this book
will be used in future marketing campaigns, so even if you aren’t in the
marketing business, it’s a worthwhile read as a measure of
self-awareness and self-defense.

Seth Brown is a freelance writer and the
author of Rhode Island Curiosities. His website is
http://www.RisingPun.com


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Curating the End of A Love Affair: The New Museum of Broken Relationships via [N.Y.T.]

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Coming Soon | ‘The Museum of Broken
Relationships’

The Museum of Broken RelationshipsImages
courtesy of “The Museum of Broken Relationships”
Fuzzy handcuffs are part of the exhibit.

Love letters, scrapbooks, pressed flowers, vials of blood: these
relationship mementos finally have a place to call home. “The Museum of Broken
Relationships
” is a roving exhibition of donated objects organized
by Olinka Vistica and Drazen Grubisic in Croatia as a cathartic response
to the emotional turmoil of love lost. Along with an anonymous short
story detailing the emotional resonance of each donation, these
artifacts of failed romances provide a much-needed alternative to the
usual heartbreak-recovery methods like Charlie Kaufman’s memory erasure
and/or binge drinking.

Currently showing in Kilkenny, Ireland, with plans to return to North
America in 2010, the exhibition boasts more than 100 artifacts
submitted from around the world. And it expands with every city it
visits as the heartbroken share their pain by depositing the detritus of
their defunct relationships — which, in addition to the items mentioned
above, include a wedding dress, fuzzy handcuffs and a prosthetic leg
from a man who fell in love with his physical therapist. Now, if they
could only solve the issue of tattoo removal. …


The Museum of Broken Relationships This
prosthetic leg belonged to a man who fell in love with his physical
therapist.


The Museum of Broken Relationships A
wedding dress.

Measha Brueggergosman a Celestial Opera DIVA with no “Ego”. via [afrobella]

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photos via [Afrobella]
I absolutely HEART this big stunning goddess with the big spell
bounding voice, with an even bigger spectacular Afro! This Canadian
prima donna hails from the Maratimes. Marsha Brueggergosman has sung in
almost all of the major cities over the globe. She’s opened the seasons
of the Quebec Symphony, the Atlanta Symphony, and the San Francisco
Symphony, just to name a few. She is a soprano who is a free-lance
soloist ie. “hired gun” brought in to work with the world’s best
orchestras. Despite the fact that her glorious “once-of-a-lifetime” job
requires her to travel to the world’s greatest of cities and to perform
in the most luxe of venues in front of the highest echolen of classical
arts patrons; Measha never gives off the impression of being jaded. In
fact, her one low brow indulgence is reality TV, while my ONE highbrow
indulgence is opera!Lol. I strongly suggest that you check out Measha Brueggergosman and
find out when she will be performing in your city.

via [YouTube]


via [YouTube]

via [YouTube]

via [YouTube]

via [YouTube]

via [YouTube]

Night & Dreams Night
& Dreams
by Measha Brueggergosman Justus Zeyen 

Buy new: $30.49
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Surprise: Cabaret Songs Bolcom Satie & Schoenberg Surprise:
Cabaret Songs Bolcom Satie & Schoenberg
by Measha
Brueggergosman
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So Much to Tell So Much to
Tell

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Retail Therapy: Why not buy these HAUTE Shoes instead of paying Your Mortgage this Month?!! via [Worship Worthy]

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Bad-Ass Shoe Designer from Paris, Raphael Young   by Cody Ross

PARIS/NYC: Raphael Young is the intriguing, bad-ass shoe designer hailing from Paris. His collections are explorations in extreme craftsmanship, angular geometrics and monochrome embellishment that seem fundamentally fresh — yet reflect the classical style/quality of the iconic design houses and influences that nurtured his vision, including his uncle, legendary Monsieur Alexandre Narcy, who was the footwear director at YSL for over four decades.
In just three seasons Raphael (who is 34 and of Korean heritage) has cemented a position as the ‘edgiest’ most sought-after shoe creator by fashion aficionados the world over. This week, Raphael sat in the Priestess NYC atelier in the West Village, showcasing the intricate details of his super-durable carbon-composite heels and boots in a mosaic of metal and leather. From Vogue and Lucky to The Museum at FIT, the critics were mesmerized.
While they all heap praise on the collection, Raphael has the more theatrical role of conveying his vision — especially now that his talent has been recognized by major publications and prominent stores, and is the reason he has come to NYC to percolate his brand. Paul Viguier, Raphael’s Marketing Manager, says “creativity and craftsmanship are in his blood and Raphael gives methodical attention to detail, research and quality.”

Looking like a character from the d’Artagnan era, dressed in dark tones with his wavy-slick black hair and leather-spiked boots, Raphael is one of those rare talents who seem to fall from the sky — although the reality of his story is decades of hard work and collaborations with venerable design houses from YSL and Manish Arora to the Korean powerhouse, Avista-Kaylee Tankus. Yet for all his practical knowledge of design and production, his philosophy is fundamentally that of a master artisan.

“What interests me about shoes is the transformational process,” he says. “The process of turning a concept into a concrete with amazing artistic attributes and properties that cannot be easily replicated.”
For the AW/09 collection, that means focusing on futurist motifs and morphing images of the Art Nouveau and Bauhaus periods into chic battle armor shoes and boots for exquisite women: indestructible carbon and aluminum heels with silhouettes comprised of the finest nappa and specchio nero leathers and audacious metallic finishes.
He cites Ludwig Mies Van der Rohe, Zaha Hadid and Le Corbusier as serious inspirations and is very keen on light-weight materials such as carbon-fibers and composites. Raphael’s contribution to modern fashion has been both his technical and abstract treatments of embellishment and innovative/cool décor. His ‘Eagle One’ Aluminio heels are to die for and have been seen on ‘it’ girls Eleonora Abbagnato (Dancer Etoile of the Opera de Paris), singer Katy Perry and bomb-shell Bond-girl, Olga Kurylenko. His work conjures images of strong, sophisticated women fused with courageous femininity.
Zaha Hadid
Le Corbusier
Olga Kurylenko

Eleonora Abbagnato

Katy Perry

Born in 1974 in Seoul and adopted by French parents, Raphael was raised in Romans near Avignone. His father was an engineer and his mother a pediatrician. Steeped in fashion from an early age and mentored by his uncle who was a master technician-artisan, he moved to Paris and in no time was recognized as a creative-genius. (He was also a Naval cadet where he took a keen interest in uniform tailoring and French military design).
Raphael showed his first eponymous collection three seasons ago in Paris and swiftly became a cult figure. Embedded in his work is a ‘gothic-chic-futurism’ that juxtaposes leather matte and shine, playing with textures and their reflective qualities. There’s nothing remotely simple about the complex, futuristic synthesis of line, cut, and glinting surfaces that manifest beautifully in his work (it is as if they might have been extruded from some techno-industrial machine). The shoe range is amazing and comes in iridescent gold, silver and copper tones enveloped in soft leathers with a raw, motor-bike aura.
Raphael’s genius is his projection of couture techniques into a universe of advancing and changing technology. A crude description might be “sci-fi gothic motorbike couture,” but in truth the right words are hard to find.

Raphael Young defies references or narrative, and fuses experimentation with materials and sculpture to the Nth-power. He is a visionary designer who is humble and grounded and whose shoes are, well, superb!

Cody and Raphael at Priestess NYC

Check out the gallery at:  www.raphaelyoung.com

For sales enquiries contact Paul at: paul@justwm.com

Cody Ross (cody@priestessnyc.com)

Libation Coordination Operation via [Shoes and Booze]

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Tonight you’ll want a drink that has enough kick to make you kick it to the cutie over by the DJ booth. The Blackberry Collins is just for you. This drink combines DeKuyper Blackberry, lemon juice, sugar syrup, and soda water with Hendrick’s Gin (the subtle notes of cucumber, rose petal and other botanicals make it the perfect mate for berry-flavored mixers). Dark, strong and sweet… it’s the way to go for a late summer’s night drink… or date (smile).

Candy” pumps by Shoes for Lovely People

Whether you’re wearing these sandals to happy hour or the hottest nightspot, you have to order a drink with the “Midas touch”. Start with a shot of Goldschlager at your favorite dive bar (don’t want everyone to see you drink like a coed), if you dare. If you’ve never had it, it tastes like Red Hots on acid. Then, at the bar du jour, request a Goldfinger. A combination of Goldschlager, Grand Marnier and ginger ale, it’s a sweet, spicy way to kick your summer fun into high gear.

Sam Edelman’s “Nova”

Take the frilly femme fatale theme a step further tonight by ordering a “Hot Pink Handgun” (credit: esquire.com) when you go out for drinks. Have the bartender blend Seraphin Cognac, orgeat syrup and a little lemon juice with a few raspberries and a teaspoon of super fine sugar. The recipe also calls for an egg white, but you can try that at your own risk. Egg or not, this sweet drink will have you swooning, but remember cognac can leave you reeling if you overdo it.

Be & D’s Chaimberlain

Chances are there will be open bars at every event you attend, but who needs sponsored liquor when you have a killer expense account? Let the “little people” drink whatever’s on tap for the night, and order an “Indulgence.” (Make sure the bar back puts yours in a proper glass. Shots can be so un-chic). It’s sweet and thick, but it packs a kick. If your request brings a question mark to his or her face, instruct the wonderful individual to layer De Kuyper’s brown Creme de Cacao, Disaronno Amaretto and Amarula cream into a glass and into that exact order. If it’s done without blending the layers, leave a great tip.

STELLA McCARTNEY’s patent Platform Wedge

Whether you’re in the Big Apple or not, toast the occasion with a “Lady of the Evening” (image courtesy of Imperia). It’s served at the Bryant Park Hotel’s Cellar Bar for $25, but you may be able to score one at your area’s swankiest spot. Just let the bartender know it’s a standard martini made with Imperia Vodka and a cucumber and caviar float.

Patent Peep-Toed Studded Pumps by La Silla

Though these shoes are entirely intoxicating on their own, you H-A-V-E to take them out for a twirl and a drink. A mojito or mint julep will easily echo the charm of these heels, but aren’t you tired of those already? Try something new, and spring for a Mint Summer Nightini. This one came courtesy of the folks at CocktailTimes and blends (and I quote) Stoli Blackberri, cucumber juice, simple syrup and muddled mint leaves. It’s sweet, but crisp and is the ideal drink for an evening such as this.

“Fortuna” sandal by Georgina Goodman

It’s been said that a Bloody Mary is a pretty reliable hangover remedy, but that’s more a brunch drink than something you’d order at happy hour. Opt instead for a Tomato-Basiltini (image courtesy Intoxicated Zodiac). From the folks at Intoxicated Zodiac (check Scorpio), it says you’re the kind of gal who likes flavor but isn’t all about the sweet stuff. Have your bartender muddle tomato water, a little sea salt and 3 fresh basil leaves. Then add Prairie Vodka (or other organic vodka with rustic notes) and shake over ice. Tomato water is hard to come by, but be flexible and tip well if your bartender is able to figure something out.

Bruno Frisoni ankleboots

A pair of shoes such as these calls for a cocktail that’s just as rustically elegant and indulgent. Sashay into the most luxurious watering hole and see if the bartender can muster up a Truffle Margarita (Image courtesy of Ideas in Food). (He/she probably won’t know how, so get your pen and pad ready). From the minds of Ideas in Food’s Chefs Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot, it combines Corazon Blanco Tequila (or other top shelf substitution) with a splash of maple syrup and truffle oil and is garnished with truffle slices and a lime wedge. This isn’t a sweet drink, but simply having it in your hand means you’re an intelligent imbiber.


Emanuel Ungaro’s olive eelskin branch-heeled shoes


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