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Archive for Littlewoods

Room Divider RoundUp via [Design Sponge]

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OPULUXE Lounge GroovesPlayList

room divider roundup

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d*s readers jessica, caroline and stacey asked if i would build a room divider guide asap for some guests they had coming into town. room dividers run the gamut from screens and hanging panels to full on storage units. i’ve chosen my favorites above and below but i always suggest using fabric to create an inexpensive divider panel. you can pick up inexpensive fabric at repro depot, purl soho, ikea and hancock and then use wire or curtain rods to hang them between spaces. have an idea that isn’t listed here? feel free to add it in the comment section below. there are six more slides after the jump so click here for the full post or click “read more” below.

[image above, clockwise from top left: desmond screen by jonathan adler $850, j schatz happening curtain $1250, bamboo stagger by brave space $2350, molo softwall $750+, nomad system by mio $56 per unit]

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[image above, clockwise from top left: until dawn curtain $116, puzzle screen $60 per unit]

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[image above, left to right: dan bleier divider, yuki screen $1180, hultet divider $49.99]

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[image above, clockwise from top left: hultet drape $12.99, three panel screen in teak (1stdibs), space room divider $228, pause structure $4799, kiva room divider $1299]

screens_4_2.jpg
[image above, clockwise from top left: piasa room divider $6,040, ivy panels $60, chicago storage unit $1799]

screens_5_1.jpg
[image above, clockwise from top left: designer’s eye wall $599+, hultet room divider (i’d spraypaint this white or bright, bold color) $39.99, curva screen $1870, eileen gray screen $5242, coil room divider $398]

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[image above, left to right: self cabinet $170 and up, hardwood screen $2100, pivot screen $5796]

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[image above: cubits storage system, stack to create room divider- $198 per kit]

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[image above, left to right: eames folding screen $1865, ricci room divider $699, rondo hanging screen $198]

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[image above, clockwise from top left: algues by the bouroullecs, $30 per pack]

lily-young-ds.jpg
[image above, clockwise from top left: lily yung die-cut panels]

winhard-2.jpg
[image above, left to right: mo-bi-le-o’s by kenneth wingard ($89-$92 per pack). hang in panels to create a room divider]


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23 Pieces of Glowing Furniture via [trendhunter]

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OPULUXE Lounge GroovesPlayList

Bianca Bartz

by Bianca Bartz

23 Pieces of Glowing Furniture (SUPER GALLERY)

There’s a growing wave ofdesigners with a fascination with illuminated textiles. We’ve seen

this in fashion before, including glow in the dark clothes and accessories, but this time we’re focusing in on furniture.

Trend Hunter has featured a bevy of phenomenal designs for the home that light up, some functioning like innovative lamps, others giving the ability to set custom moods, while others act as regular furniture, just with a very modern twist on design.

Check out some of the brightest ideas on Trend Hunter below.

Seats and Sofas

Modern Louis XV Furniture – The Neo Neon Collection (GALLERY)

Louis XV furniture has been given a modern spin by Lee Broom. The designer describes his six piece trendy fusion collection as “art that is ultimately functional.” The fantastically eclectic concept plays… [More]

Glowing Ice Cube Furniture – Moss LED Sofa

The first thing that comes to mind when I see this LED-illuminated Moss couch is that it looks like it belongs in an igloo. This makes a stunning compromise for anyone intrigued by the aesthetics of the… [More]

Eudora Lamp Chair

At just under $3,000, the Eudora lamp chair is a fiverglass chair that is upholstered in fabric and then encased in resin.  It’s illuminated from the inside and made by hand.  You can choose from a variety… [More]

Tables

Illuminated Furniture – Ambient Luminescent Lounge Table

A dimmer foot switch adds to the excitement of this sexy illuminated lounge table. It has a high gloss finish, is UV resistant, and features a stow-away cable. The price tag is $779.00 [More]

Interactive Furniture – LED Coffee Table In Action (VIDEO)

For that extra punch of ambiance in your living room, consider getting an LED coffee table. The creation from the Evil Mad Scientist Lab consists of a glass-top table embedded with LEDs that are motion-activated.… [More]

Awe Inspiring LED Table by Ingo Maurer

Brilliant LED table glitters more than your candle-lit dinner. “led table designed by ingo maurer in 2003. this beautiful table is limited in production. this table is a true example of modern design.… [More]

Lightable LED Dinner Table – Create a Halo of Light Around Any Object (VIDEO)

This transparent LED table was designed by Julian Appelius and Fabien Dumas.  When you place an object on the table, the object become illuminated by a halo of LED light… even if that object is your… [More]

Cabinets

Glow in the Dark Furniture – Fullmoon Cabinet (GALLERY)

Sotirios Papadopoulos designed this Fullmoon cabinet for Ennezero using ecologically-friendly paint. The Fullmoon glows in the dark and in that sense, as far as I am concerned, this is a creation that… [More]

Fiber Optic Cabinets – Horm Voltaceleste by Salvatore Indriolo (GALLERY)

Horm Voltaceleste is a glowing cabinet by designer Salvatore Indriolo. The cupboard has lighting inside and its wooden doors feature optical fibers of various diameters whose positions are governed by… [More]

Other

Inflatable Furniture – New Inflatable Bar For Sale or Rent

The new inflatable collection from Bubble Miami proves that inflatable furniture can be hot.  Interestingly, you can also rent the inflatable bar, making sure you have the hippest pool party on your block.… [More]

LED Prayer Rug Glows When Facing Mecca – Sajjdah 1426

Not only does this high-tech prayer rug look super funky with its glowing design, but its LED lights actually offer functional properties. Embedded inside the Turkish tapestry is a compass that enables… [More]

Generate Light: LTT Illuminated Bathtub & Furniture

Generate offers a full line of illuminated furniture, including illumniated bath tubs, illuminated sinks, illuminated lamps, illuminated coffee tables, and illuminated everything. “This illuminated, self… [More]

Mood Sensitive Design – The Mood Bowl Changes Color (GALLERY)

This pear glass, which plugs into the wall, changes color according to your mood. The mood bowl is capable of going through a cycle of 8 different colors but it can also remain on the same color of your… [More]

Luxury DJ Booths – The $5500 Homelander (VIDEO)

The ‘HOMELANDER’ is a high end DJ Booth by DJ Furniture.  It comes with a customized high gloss finish, integrated air cooling fan, and in the color of your choice. The 3 LED lights and the 2 color powerleds… [More]

Ondine Illuminated Shower: Reenact Your Alien Abduction

There’s nothing more relaxing that having a nice shower and letting the blue rays of light fall on your body.
“Sitting in the relaxation room, you are displaced to a garden setting in your Tuscan mansion,… [More]

Chromotherapy-Equipped Shower

Now you can shower with chromotherapy! [More]

Illuminated Door Handles

We won’t need “do not disturb” cards anymore to indicate the room is occupied. Stockholm-based company, Brighthandle offers new door handles including lights to encode room privacy. Various models can… [More]

Semi-Precious Illuminated Counter Tops

Seen at the recent Kitchen and Bath Industry Show in Las Vegas, exotic solid surfaces made of translucent semi-precious stones can be combined with under-counter lighting to create custom, eye-popping… [More]

Glass & Walls

Furniture Hacks – LED Glass Door (GALLERY)

These days, incredible interior design is all about originality, and sometimes the only way to do that is by modifying the supplies available in store. Take this door for example. Instead of leaving… [More]

Illuminated Eco-Chic Windows – Lightway (GALLERY)

It appears that light bulbs may soon become obsolete if Damian Savio, a Sydney design student, has his way. The Longueville designer invented Lightway window louvers that illuminate dwellings without… [More]

Wall-Integrated LEDs – Disguised Torn Lighting (GALLERY)

Torn Lighting by designer Billy May creatively integrate and disguise LED lights within your walls for a seamless and clean interior light solution. Painted the same color as your walls, the Torn Lighting… [More]

Light Canvases

Art Coincides With Your Mood – MoodSpace by Interactive Art (GALLERY)

What if you could design your own moods? For only $25,000 you can add an entire wall that shimmers and glows to your living room decor. Now imagine being able to fine tune it. The MoodSpace by Interactive… [More]

Paint with LED Light – Philips Imagination Light Canvas (GALLERY)

They should have this up in all waiting rooms in hospitals and offices. Philips Electronics introduced their Imagination Light Canvas— an interactive light wall that uses touch screen and Philips technologies… [More]




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Why Not Try One of These Very Stylish EcoLUXE D.I.Y. Projects?… via [ReadyMade]

The New Design Crew

Springtime brings with it two design fairs native to New York City
flora: the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF), and BKLYN
DESIGNS. Taking place in May, both draw top designers who share their
new lines of furniture, accessories, and other objects. Here, five
young designers who fill the “ones-to-watch” bill–with a project from
each that you can make at home.

Moss Panels

Moss Panels

Springtime calls to mind nature bursting into impressive display.
For some–namely furniture and design fans–it also conjures up images
of a different sort: two esteemed design fairs native to New York City
flora, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair
(ICFF) and BKLYN
DESIGNS
. Taking place in May, both draw top designers to share
their new lines of furniture, accessories, and other objects. Over the
years, the shows have proven to open doors for a new batch of New
York-based designers. Here, five who fill the “ones-to-watch” bill–with
a project from each that you can make at home. It’s time to get to
know their genius.

by Kiera Coffee

Photos by Bryan McCay

Some designers invent their collections from one dedicated notion or
theme. BOA’s line of eco-conscious beds, storage units, stools, and
tables is more the result of a chain of inspired reactions. Her pieces
have all been born from the need for something that did not exist. And
though her starting points vary, her aesthetic is handsomely focused.
BOA uses almost exclusively nontoxic, recycled, and sustainable
materials, though, she says, “I don’t want the pieces to scream green,”
and in fact they don’t. She adds, “I also don’t want everything to
look like a matched set,” which is why she brings cohesion in tone but
does not endlessly repeat details. In the coming months BOA will expand
her line of upholstered pieces and also her meditation accessories.
She would also like to engage communities that have often been left out
of the larger green conversation on issues of sustainability. “It
doesn’t always cost more money, and the topic shouldn’t be elitist,”
she says.

BOA
Brooklyn, New York
objectinteriors.com

    Rig a vertical wetland by sewing live moss into shadow boxes for
    your wall. 

    1. Cut a section of window screen—½ inch smaller (on all sides) than
    inside dimensions of your frame. Thread the needle with a generous
    length of fishing line, knotting at the end.

    2. Lay screen down and insert needle from the back of the screen so
    the knot is not visible. Start sewing moss onto the screen, beginning at
    one corner and lightly overlapping layers of moss until you form a
    solid panel across the entire screen.

    3. Remove any cardboard backing from frame and discard. Transfer
    plexiglass from front of frame to back (in place of cardboard),
    attaching with any built-in tabs.

    4. Turn shadow box front side up (recessed side facing you). Squirt
    light layer of super glue along inside edges of plexiglass, and
    crisscross in the middle (glue pattern should be a square with an X
    inside it).

    5. Insert finished moss panel in frame and press lightly to adhere.
    Let dry for 30 minutes. To water moss, use a spray bottle and mist
    daily.

Moss Panels

$25

ingredients

tools



Creeping Toy Caterpillar

Creeping Toy Caterpillar

Springtime calls to mind nature bursting into impressive display.
For some–namely furniture and design fans–it also conjures up images
of a different sort: two esteemed design fairs native to New York City
flora, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair
(ICFF) and BKLYN
DESIGNS
. Taking place in May, both draw top designers to share
their new lines of furniture, accessories, and other objects. Over the
years, the shows have proven to open doors for a new batch of New
York-based designers. Here, five who fill the “ones-to-watch” bill–with
a project from each that you can make at home. It’s time to get to
know their genius.

by Kiera Coffee

Photos by Bryan McCay

Lisa Mahar
New York, New York
kidoproducts.com

Designer, toy-store owner, and architect Mahar introduced her first
line of chic, modernist toys in 2008. Her products are a colorful,
gorgeously wrought collection of puzzles, blocks, wooden books, bath
toys, and more. They address the complex issues of child development,
playfulness, and aesthetics all at once. Mahar says, “Before having my
first child, I wasn’t really interested in toys or retail at all.” Which
might explain why her designs appeal to childless adults, parents,
and, of course, kids. “I try to make toys that are conceptually clear
as well as beautiful. If you give kids beautiful things, you show them
respect,” she explains. And she still keeps her focus keenly on each
toy’s purpose. According to Mahar, “My view of success is about hitting a
balance between great craftŃwhich is about love for the process, the
object, and the recipientŃand creating things that are affordable and
accessible. If you get that balance right, even manufacturing becomes
part of the larger community because that’s the step that brings it to
the world.”

    String a variety of wooden balls together to make a charming, wiggly
    friend. 

    1. Drill through center of the 2 1⁄2-inch balls with the 1⁄4-inch
    bit. On one of those balls, mark an X 1 inch from existing hole. Wrap
    tape around the 13⁄64-inch drill bit, 1⁄2 inch from tip. Drill into the X
    using tape as a guide for where to stop. This is the hole for dowel
    connection from body to head.

    2. Drill into the center of the 2-inch ball, stopping at tape mark
    to make the other end of dowel connection.

    3. Cut piece of dowel to 7⁄8 inch with the handsaw. Make sure it
    fits in holes, but don’t glue yet.

    4. Mark two Xs on the 2-inch ball (the head) 1 inch apartĘand 1⁄2
    inch from the center of ball (for antennae). Drill with taped bit.

    5. Drill into each 3⁄4-inch ball (antennae tips) up to tape. Cut two
    pieces of dowel to 2 3⁄8 inches (to become the antennae).

    6. Push clothesline through four 21⁄2-inch balls.

    7. One inch from the center of each ball, mark two Xs (for wheels).
    The front ball gets four wheels so make two more marks 1⁄2 inch from the
    Xs. Drill into Xs 3⁄4 inch deep.

    8. Collect all 11⁄4-inch balls (future wheels) and drill through. On
    all but one, attach countersink for #8 fasteners and drill into one
    side of holes deep enough to countersink the screw.

    9. Sand all balls, paint, and let dry. Repeat as needed. Glue on
    eyes, dowel connections to body, head, and antennae tips.

    10. Screw on wheels with washers between wood surfaces.

    11. Push rope through balls and tie at front and back. Use last
    11⁄4-inch ball for pulling toy, knotting the rope on both sides.

Creeping Caterpillar

$30

ingredients

    • Four 21/₂ -inch wood balls
    • 1⁄4 -inch wood drill bit
    • 1⁄4 -inch dowel rod
    • Two 3⁄4-inch wood balls
    • Eleven 11⁄4 -inch wood balls (for wheels)
    • 3⁄16 -inch-thick rope (like a clothesline)
    • Paint
    • Wood glue
    • 20mm wiggle eyes
    • Ten #8 washers

tools

    • Drill
    • Ruler
    • Pencil
    • Tape
    • 13⁄64-inch wood drill bit
    • One 2-inch wood ball
    • Wood handsaw
    • Countersink for #8 fasteners
    • Ten #8 × 1/₂ -inch flathead wood screws with a Phillips drive
    • 220-grit sandpaper

Ostrich Egg Lamp

Ostrich Egg Lamp

Springtime calls to mind nature bursting into impressive display.
For some–namely furniture and design fans–it also conjures up images
of a different sort: two esteemed design fairs native to New York City
flora, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair
(ICFF) and BKLYN
DESIGNS
. Taking place in May, both draw top designers to share
their new lines of furniture, accessories, and other objects. Over the
years, the shows have proven to open doors for a new batch of New
York-based designers. Here, five who fill the “ones-to-watch” bill–with
a project from each that you can make at home. It’s time to get to
know their genius.

by Kiera Coffee

Photos by Bryan McCay

Matt Austin
Brooklyn, New York
mattaustin.net

A respected casein-paint muralist for many years, Austin recently
debuted a full line of furniture, lighting, and toys. He has also
innovated numerous finishes that he now applies to an elegant line of
his own furnishings. These include a graphite finish with a masculine
glint (applied to a table) and a secret recipe for glow-in-the-dark blue
pigment (applied to a wooden lightbulb that glows for 12 hours after
the electric lightbulbs are turned off!). Taking much inspiration from
European design, Austin gives great attention to form and juxtaposes
that with a subtle sense of humor. Perfect examples are his side table
shaped like a tooth and his dining table sporting one graceful leg in
the shape of a femur. Austin tempers his respect for design with an
infectious, modern irreverence. “I appreciate the seriousness of
something most when I poke a little fun at it.”

    Trim this naturally beautiful ovoid to create a perfect hanging
    light. 

    1. Draw a line around circumference of ostrich egg about ⅔ of an
    inch from top. Cut egg along line with Dremel (outdoors or in
    well-ventilated room), then smooth edge with sandpaper.

    2. Drill a hole in the top of uncut end of egg using a brick or
    ceramic drill bit. Make hole large enough to feed electrical cord
    through (about ¼ inch).

    3. Cut ½ to 1 inch of fabric away from electrical cord at either end
    to expose the wires.

    4. Place 1 inch of shrink-wrap around frayed fabric edges and shrink
    with a heat gun (leaving wires exposed).

    5. String the electrical cord through the threaded rod.

    6. Feed the exposed wires of the electrical cord through the metal
    cap of the disassembled porcelain socket. Attach those exposed wires to
    the socket screws on the porcelain socket. Reassemble the porcelain
    socket.

    7. Screw the threaded rod to the porcelain socket and set aside.

    8. Feed the electrical cord through the hole in egg, then put vase
    cap on cord, as well as the knurled nut, decorative nut, and second
    knurled nut (in that order) so they are in a row on the electrical cord.

    9. While holding the socket inside the egg, feed the threaded rod
    through the hole in the egg. Then place the vase cap over the shaft of
    the threaded rod.

    10. Screw on the knurled nut until it is firmly holding the vase cap
    to the egg, and then screw on the two other nuts. Attach the wires to
    the plug and place a lightbulb into the socket.

    Ostrich Egg Lamp

    ingredients

      • Ostrich egg
      • Fabric-covered electrical cord
      • Black shrink-wrap tube
      • Porcelain hanging lightbulb socket
      • 1-inch length of 1⁄4-inch hollow threaded rod
      • 1.5 -inch-diameter brass vase cap
      • Two 1⁄4 -inch knurled nuts
      • One 1⁄4 -inch decorative nut
      • Electrical plug
      • Small round 40-watt lightbulb

    tools

      • Pencil
      • Tape measure
      • Fine-grit sandpaper
      • Drill
      • 1⁄4-inch brick or ceramic drill bit
      • Scissors
      • Dremel Rotary Tool
      • Heat gun

    Hammock

    DIY Hammock

    Springtime calls to mind nature bursting into impressive display.
    For some–namely furniture and design fans–it also conjures up images
    of a different sort: two esteemed design fairs native to New York City
    flora, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair
    (ICFF) and BKLYN
    DESIGNS
    . Taking place in May, both draw top designers to share
    their new lines of furniture, accessories, and other objects. Over the
    years, the shows have proven to open doors for a new batch of New
    York-based designers. Here, five who fill the “ones-to-watch” bill–with
    a project from each that you can make at home. It’s time to get to
    know their genius.

    by Kiera Coffee

    Photos by Bryan McCay

    A self-proclaimed “DJ of design,” Alex Valich works in his Brooklyn
    studio mixing design references from numerous cultures. His Slave Betty
    teapot is a classic British form sporting a Japanese rope-tied
    harness. His Alma Fortune cup and saucer take Turkish tea-leaf reading
    as inspiration for their patterned glazes. Valich’s vision for
    lighting, rugs, furniture, and tableware is happily unpredictable. And
    in a sense, every DJ–a collector of elements from sources the rest of
    us might not have–is a curator at heart. Valich proves this by curating
    shows of up-and-coming designers whenever possible. He says, “I want
    to give young people some of the opportunities I had when I was
    starting out.” He also wants to promote the idea of avoiding
    overdesigning. “I don’t try to reinvent the wheel (or the fork); I want
    to use the toolbox that the world already is,” he says. This spring,
    Valich’s work will pop in collaborative projects with fellow designers.
    He also intends to create pieces of his own, but the only thing we
    know is that we should, of course, expect the unexpected.

    Alex Valich
    Brooklyn, New York
    redstrcollective.com

      Weave construction materials—which won’t fade or absorb water—into a
      truly comfortable spot for lounging. 

      1. Cut fencing into two 30×74-inch pieces, trimming the outside
      squares so that weaving has an edge. Lay out a rectangle with all
      conduit pieces, attaching elbows to create the “loom.”

      2. Overlap both pieces of snow fencing so squares alternate. Lay on
      floor in center of conduit frame.

      3. Unroll cording and mark the middle of each spool. The middle will
      be your starting point for each row of weaving.

      4. Hold the middle of one piece of nylon cording. Loop the middle of
      cording once around top corner of a 30-inch side of conduit frame.
      Weave cording in and out of snow fencing going down the long side. Keep
      tension even.

      5. At bottom, repeat loop around conduit and weave back up. Repeat
      to make four complete passes.

      6. Tie off end of nylon cording using a standard square knot (Google
      it for how-to). Leave 3-4 feet of excess to be used later.

      7. Repeat same weaving process on opposite side of snow fencing and
      in the middle of snow fencing. Weave any additional rows to create
      desired pattern. Tie all ends with square knots.

      8. Cut remaining nylon cording into two 37-foot pieces. Take the
      center of each and place one at each center of the short sides of your
      conduit. Wrap one strand of cording around right side of conduit (to
      secure fencing and hide conduit) and the other strand around left side
      of conduit. Tie off with a square knot.

      9. With all cording tied off, create “triangle” shape at each end
      (to hang hammock from) by pulling excess cording together at each side
      evenly, holding cording 1-1½ feet from conduit, and tying into a large
      knot.

      10. Create a second loop knot ½ inch away (so you can hang it).
      Repeat on the other side.

      11. Unscrew metal conduit elbows from frame and remove 74-inch
      lengths of conduit.

      12. Find trees and hang your hammock!

    DIY Hammock

    $18

    ingredients

      • 13 feet snow fencing (the orange kind with holes)
      • Two 30-inch pieces of 1/₂-inch metal conduit
      • Two 74-inch pieces of 1/₂-inch metal conduit
      • Four 1/₂-inch metal conduit elbows
      • 6 spools of 75-foot nylon cording

    tools

      • Scissors
      • Tape measure

Mod Medallions

Mod Medallions

Springtime calls to mind nature bursting into impressive display.
For some–namely furniture and design fans–it also conjures up images
of a different sort: two esteemed design fairs native to New York City
flora, the International Contemporary Furniture Fair
(ICFF) and BKLYN
DESIGNS
. Taking place in May, both draw top designers to share
their new lines of furniture, accessories, and other objects. Over the
years, the shows have proven to open doors for a new batch of New
York-based designers. Here, five who fill the “ones-to-watch” bill–with
a project from each that you can make at home. It’s time to get to
know their genius.

by Kiera Coffee

Photos by Bryan McCay

Make your own paper pendants and medallions in three quick steps.

Basing much of her work on iconic references, Alissia Melka-Teichroew
tends to turn the world on its side just a little bit…all the time. A
good example is Melka-Teichroew’s diamond ring, which plays with
perceptions of classic jewelry by being entirely made of acrylic and
keeping only the characteristic shape of a gem. She has also cleverly
used broken teacup handles as inspiration for nylon wall hooks. Fond of
playing with materials, tweaking the basic properties of familiar
objects, and re-presenting them to us anew, Melka-Teichroew repeatedly
makes us smile. She relates, “I’m trying to give my point of view, but I
want people to have room to do anything they want; wear the Ring A Day
or hang it on the wall!” Melka-Teichroew has also been expanding her
line of jewelry–bubbly necklaces, bracelets, and rings (think pop beads
from Mardis Gras, only better)–for spring.

View
Alissia’s website
.

    1. Click to download
      the medallion pattern
      . Print it out.
    2. Fold pattern according to the indicators, cut using the knife and
      cutting mat, and glue edges where needed.
    3. Glue pin back to your new brooch, allow to dry, then adorn yourself.

Mod Medallions

$5

ingredients

    • Thick paper
    • Glue (for paper)
    • Hot-glue gun (or super glue)
    • Pin back

tools

    • Mat knife
    • Cutting mat



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