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Archive for Ice cream

Cool NEW Gadget: Zoku Quick Pop Maker via [coolhunting and thekitchn]

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Zoku Quick Pop Maker

A nifty gadget that makes homemade popsicles in minutes



by Wendy Dembo

Zoku1.jpg Zoku2.jpg

With gourmet popsicle brands all over Manhattan touting newfangled flavor combos (see Popbar, People’s Pops and La Newyorkina), the Zoku Quick Pop Maker steps in with a DIY way to concoct your own—three at a time—in less than 10 minutes.

Fun to use and loved by kids, you can keep it simple or (with patience) you can make pretty pops by pouring in one liquid, letting it sit for a few minutes and then adding another layer or two of a different juice. Tipping the machine leads to wavy lines, and experiments with fruits and yogurts, or even more adventurous fixings like carrots and beets, present limitless options for creativity.

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The only downfall is that you have to freeze the Zoku for 24 hours before you can start to make your own personally-designed chilly pops. Pick it up from Zoku or Williams Sonoma for $50.

Remember the agony of waiting for popsicles to freeze when we were kids? Using technology similar to an ice cream machine, the folks behind the Zoku Quick Pop Maker have all but eliminated that wait time. Instant gratification is ours!

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[Photograph: zokuhome.com]

How It Works

The Zoku consists of a sturdy hard-plastic base filled with the same kind of liquid found in ice cream makers. There are three individual wells for popsicles set into the base. These are made of non-stick cast aluminum so the pops are easy to remove once frozen. The popsicle sticks are made from plastic and specially grooved to grip the popsicles. (Six popsicle sticks are included.)

You first have to freeze the base overnight. Once it’s frozen solid, you insert the one popsicle stick into each well, pour in your popsicle base of choice, and wait for it to freeze. A special device called the Super Tool screws into the popsicle stick and helps to lift the frozen popsicles from the mold, which are otherwise difficult to remove by simple pulling. Snap on a drip guard and the popsicles are ready to eat.

Testing It Out

Check out the slide show above for a visual walk-through of the product.

Just as the instructions said to do, we froze the base overnight and took it out when we were ready to make our pops. Shaking it, the base felt completely solid and we heard no sloshing of the liquid inside.

We made a variety of popsicles to really put the Zoku through its paces. In the first round, we did a basic lemonade pop, one with slices of strawberries, and one with some of our leftover cranberry jelly. In the second round, we tried making yogurt pops layered with pomegranate juice following the recipe we talked about yesterday.

All of the lemonade pops froze solid in about 9 minutes. The yogurt pops took a little longer, about 12 minutes for the swirled pops and 20 minutes total for the layered pops. We were able to do two batches of the lemonade pops before the base needed re-freezing. With the yogurt pops, we only got one batch.

Both the lemonade and the yogurt pops were easy to remove from the mold using the Zoku Super Tool and made perfectly formed popsicles.

The instructions recommend not washing the device between each use, but it was pretty darn sticky after our few batches! We couldn’t help splattering the top while pouring and the outside also filmed over with frozen condensation. The insides of the wells stayed pretty clean, though. Since the Zoku instructions are also adamant about making sure the Zoku is completely dry before putting it back in the freezer, we used a plastic spatula to scrape off the splatters and condensation, and then used paper towels to make sure everything was dry before re-freezing it.

The Pros

This device really was as simple and straight-forward to use as promised. There are no cords to plug in, and no fancy parts to figure out. Using the Zoku is almost completely self-explanatory. Kids can definitely use it, though we’d recommend having an adult around for children under the age of 8 or so.

It made lovely popsicles and seems to work well with a lot of different base ingredients. Since the results are so instantaneous, it was really fun to play around with adding fruit, making layers, and combining flavors.

The texture of the pops was really amazing. Since it freezes so quickly, the ice crystals stay very small. This makes for a smoother, more evenly-textured popsicle. Biting off a piece was almost like eating a spoonful of ice cream or sorbet.

The Cons

The Zoku was also trickier to use in some ways than we expected. Anything that touches the sides of the mold freezes instantly. So if you’re making a layered pop or adding fruit, it can be challenging not to drip on the sides and to position fruits where you want them. Our pops definitely did not look as perfect as the pictures!

The instructions also say to insert the popsicle sticks before pouring in any of the ingredients, but we found that the sticks were really in the way and made things messier. It was far easier to fill the mold nearly full and then insert the sticks. The middle doesn’t freeze for several minutes, so as long as you leave a little headroom to allow for the stick, this was fine.

The promise that pops will freeze in 7-9 minutes and that the base can be used for three batches before re-freezing is a bit misleading. This might be true if you are making three batches of all-juice pops in very quick succession. But if you’re doing anything more complicated (like layers or making pudding pops), if you don’t take the pops out as soon as they’re ready, or if you wait a little too long between batches, a second batch starts to become iffy.

Subsequent batches also take much longer to make. This is expected as the base thaws in your warm summer kitchen, but can be frustrating if you have a line of neighborhood children wanting to know why they have to wait so long!

Overall Impressions

This is a good product with a solid design and lots of fun applications. We think it’s ideal for small family gatherings or an afternoon play-date with a friend or two.

Since you can only make three popsicles at once and since they have to be eaten right away (meaning you can’t make pops in advance or save ones that aren’t eaten), we think this is less ideal for larger parties and gatherings.

Do you have a Zoku? How have you liked it?

Check It Out!
Zoku Quick Pop Maker from Zoku
Zoku Quick Pop Maker, $49.95 from Williams-Sonoma

Apartment Therapy Media makes every effort to test and review products fairly and transparently. The views expressed in this review are the personal views of the reviewer and this particular product review was not sponsored or paid for in any way by the manufacturer or an agent working on their behalf. However, the manufacturer did give us the product for testing and review purposes.

(Images: Williams-Sonoma and Emma Christensen)




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Giant Ice Cream Sandwich = Yumlicious via [the luxuryspot]

Giant Ice Cream Sandwich = Yumlicious

By Bryce

I love ice cream, and I love sandwiches.  And I love them as big as can be.  Here’s the recipe for one that’ll rock your socks off (ad feed at least 4-6 people).

Recipe and photo courtesy of Land O’Lakes, Inc. via

 




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QUICK & DECADENT Gelato Recipes via [rubbahslippahsinitaly.blogspot.com and chicagosane.blogspot.com]

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Dolce: goat milk and double chocolate gelato

Gelato season is upon us

via [thekosherfoodies.com]

If you really like chocolate and gelato, make this.

And if you like chocolate, you should make her Outrageous Brownies, which we’ve made a pareve version of a bunch of times (but they were pre-blog, so unfortunately we didn’t take photos… next time!)

Where were we? Oh, yes. Chocolate gelato. You should probably serve it with something not as chocolatey, like a fruity syrup or whipped cream.

Ingredients:

Directions:

  1. Heat the milk, cream, and 1/2 cup sugar in a 2-quart saucepan, until the sugar dissolves and the milk starts to simmer. Add the cocoa powder and chocolate and whisk until smooth. Pour into a heat-proof measuring cup.
  2. Place the egg yolks and the remaining 1/4 cup sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and beat on high speed for 3 to 5 minutes, until light yellow and very thick. With the mixer on low speed, slowly pour the hot chocolate mixture into the egg mixture. Pour the egg and chocolate mixture back into the 2-quart saucepan and cook over medium-low heat, stirring constantly, until thickened. A candy thermometer will register about 180 degrees F. Don’t allow the mixture to boil!
  3. Pour the mixture through a sieve into a bowl and stir in the coffee liqueur, vanilla, and salt. Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on top of the custard and chill completely.
  4. Pour the custard into the bowl of an ice cream maker and process according to the manufacturer’s directions. Stir in the roughly chopped chocolate, if using, and freeze in covered containers. Allow the gelato to thaw slightly before serving.

Kiwi-Macadamia nut gelato

Kiwi   macadamia nut gelato

1 1/2 cups whole milk

1/2 cup heavy cream

2 large, whole eggs

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

3 large, ripe kiwi

1/3 cup macadamia nuts, diced

1. Halve the kiwi fruit and scoop out the flesh into a small bowl. Smash to a pulp with a wooden spoon. Turn into a strainer over a bowl to drain and place in the refrigerator.

2. Heat the milk and heavy cream in a heavy saucepot until tiny bubbles form around the edge. Do not let come to a boil!

3. Meanwhile, whisk the eggs together with the sugar until light in color. Temper the egg mixture by slowly whisking in the hot milk in a thin, steady stream. Strain the egg/milk liquid into a clean saucepot and cook over very low heat, stirring frequently, until it coats the back of a spoon. Do not allow to overcook as the eggs will curdle.

4. Pour into a glass bowl and allow to cool completely, stirring occasionally to avoid a skin from forming on the top. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until very cold.

5. Churn the mixture according to the manufacturer’s instructions until firm. Scoop into a large bowl and fold in the kiwi pulp and macnuts. Transfer gelato to a container and freeze until desired consistency.

Carrot gelato: It’s the bombe!

I liked the flavor result of this second recipe attempt. In the first, grated carrots were steeped in hot milk and the gelato didn’t taste enough of carrots. The color was also entirely different, more of a saffron yellow since I used eggs which were meant for making egg pasta. The gingerbread cake recipe comes from Joyofbaking.com which I followed to the letter except to leave out the lemon zest. A 15×10-inch baking sheet was perfect for obtaining a layer from which I cut out 3-inch discs. As for the italian meringue, I used this recipe, the same one that I made for the roasted peaches dessert *. Of course all this fuss for “exploding carrots” is superfluous. Spherical shapes or no, a couple of scoops topped with finely chopped candied ginger works just as well. And a slice of gingerbread cake gives you something to sink your two front teeth into.

CARROT GELATO (makes about 1½ pints)

1½ cups whole milk

3/4 cup fresh carrot juice

2 large eggs

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon rice flour

pinch of salt

1-2 tablespoons acacia or orange flower honey (opt.)

Heat the milk and carrot juice in a saucepan until tiny bubbles form around the edge. In the meantime, whisk the eggs, sugar, rice flour, and salt in a separate bowl until light in color.

Temper the beaten eggs by whisking in a small amount of the heated milk/carrot liquid, a little at a time, until all is incorporated. Strain this mixture back into a clean saucepan and cook, stirring constantly, over very low heat until the carrot cream has thickened and coats the back of a spoon.

Remove from heat and pour into a heavy glass bowl. Taste to check for sweetness and stir in the honey if necessary. Allow to cool, then refrigerate for several hours or overnite until the carrot cream is completely cold. Churn according to manufacturer’s instructions for your icecream/gelato machine.

Coffee and donuts.. gelato

Donuts in Italy, but we call ’em ciambella (ch’yahm-BEH-lah). Same smell…

1 1/2 cups whole milk

1/2 cup heavy cream

1 heaping tablespoon finely ground espresso coffee, or 1 – 2 tablespoons regular coffee

(you can adjust more or less, the intensity of coffee flavor to your liking)

2 large, whole eggs

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2 donuts, broken into small pieces with 1 cup reserved for topping

a knob of butter

1 – 2 tablespoons brown sugar

1. Combine the milk with the heavy cream and heat in a heavy saucepot until tiny bubbles form around the edge; do not let it come to a boil! Stir in the coffee grounds and allow to steep for 10 minutes. Add the vanilla extract.

2. Whisk the eggs and sugar together until light in color. When the milk is ready, temper the egg mixture by slowly whisking in the hot milk. Pour this egg/coffee milk through a strainer lined with cheesecloth and return to a clean saucepot. Cook over very low heat, stirring frequently, until it coats the back of a spoon. Do not overcook as the eggs will curdle.

3. Pour into a glass bowl and allow to cool completely, stirring occasionally to avoid a skin from forming on the top. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until very cold.

4. Prepare the donut topping: Melt a bit of butter in a nonstick pan, add the reserved donut crumbs and a generous sprinkle of brown sugar. Stir and saute until the crumbs are golden and caramelized into crunchy bits. Cool and set aside.

5. Pour the chilled coffee custard into the gelato machine. Churn according to manufacturer’s instructions, adding the uncooked broken donut crumbs just before gelato is done. Transfer to a container, sprinkle with donut topping and freeze until set.

1 1/2 cups whole milk

1/2 cup heavy cream

1 heaping tablespoon finely ground espresso coffee, or 1 – 2 tablespoons regular coffee

(you can adjust more or less, the intensity of coffee flavor to your liking)

2 large, whole eggs

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2 donuts, broken into small pieces with 1 cup reserved for topping

a knob of butter

1 – 2 tablespoons brown sugar

1. Combine the milk with the heavy cream and heat in a heavy saucepot until tiny bubbles form around the edge; do not let it come to a boil! Stir in the coffee grounds and allow to steep for 10 minutes. Add the vanilla extract.

2. Whisk the eggs and sugar together until light in color. When the milk is ready, temper the egg mixture by slowly whisking in the hot milk. Pour this egg/coffee milk through a strainer lined with cheesecloth and return to a clean saucepot. Cook over very low heat, stirring frequently, until it coats the back of a spoon. Do not overcook as the eggs will curdle.

3. Pour into a glass bowl and allow to cool completely, stirring occasionally to avoid a skin from forming on the top. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until very cold.

4. Prepare the donut topping: Melt a bit of butter in a nonstick pan, add the reserved donut crumbs and a generous sprinkle of brown sugar. Stir and saute until the crumbs are golden and caramelized into crunchy bits. Cool and set aside.

5. Pour the chilled coffee custard into the gelato machine. Churn according to manufacturer’s instructions, adding the uncooked broken donut crumbs just before gelato is done. Transfer to a container, sprinkle with donut topping and freeze until set.

1 1/2 cups whole milk

1/2 cup heavy cream

1 heaping tablespoon finely ground espresso coffee, or 1 – 2 tablespoons regular coffee

(you can adjust more or less, the intensity of coffee flavor to your liking)

2 large, whole eggs

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

2 donuts, broken into small pieces with 1 cup reserved for topping

a knob of butter

1 – 2 tablespoons brown sugar

1. Combine the milk with the heavy cream and heat in a heavy saucepot until tiny bubbles form around the edge; do not let it come to a boil! Stir in the coffee grounds and allow to steep for 10 minutes. Add the vanilla extract.

2. Whisk the eggs and sugar together until light in color. When the milk is ready, temper the egg mixture by slowly whisking in the hot milk. Pour this egg/coffee milk through a strainer lined with cheesecloth and return to a clean saucepot. Cook over very low heat, stirring frequently, until it coats the back of a spoon. Do not overcook as the eggs will curdle.

3. Pour into a glass bowl and allow to cool completely, stirring occasionally to avoid a skin from forming on the top. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until very cold.

4. Prepare the donut topping: Melt a bit of butter in a nonstick pan, add the reserved donut crumbs and a generous sprinkle of brown sugar. Stir and saute until the crumbs are golden and caramelized into crunchy bits. Cool and set aside.

5. Pour the chilled coffee custard into the gelato machine. Churn according to manufacturer’s instructions, adding the uncooked broken donut crumbs just before gelato is done. Transfer to a container, sprinkle with donut topping and freeze until set.

Frozen gelato-filled fruit

[Frozen  gelato-filled fruit]

Use ripe, unblemished, essentially perfect fruit. Scoop out enough of the flesh without tearing the skin and fill the halves with softened icecream. Stick them back together and freeze until solid. I’d suggest to take them out atleast 10 minutes before serving or else your guests just might chip a sweet tooth on one of these. 😉

I was playing around with the composition of fruit bowls in order to get a feel for sketching again, and what happens?  I vaguely recalled a memory of having frozen gelato-filled fruit at the wedding of one of my husband’s relatives. The lovely bride hailed from southern Italy, from the region of Calabria, and from what I hear, these icy and refreshing treats are often served for dessert at wedding celebrations.

I could not find any information on the web as to how the idea of all this came about, but from what my husband tells me, the fruit is halved and pitted, then the flesh is scooped out to be made into a gelato. The fruit gelato goes back into the hollows of the fruit, reassembled, and frozen. It sounds easy enough to make but time-consuming work if a variety of yummy summer fruit is used, so I subbed with some vanilla bean gelato that I had made previously and dug into my fridge for whatever I could find. Eh, so much for a fruit bowl composition, but they turned out ok!

Pomegranate gelato

[pomegranate gelato]


Ingredients:

1 cup freshly squeezed* pomegranate juice (requires 2 large)

1 ¼ cup heavy cream

5 oz. (3/4 cup) granulated sugar

Combine the juice and sugar in a small, heavy, saucepot and bring to a simmer. Continue to simmer, uncovered, for about 10 minutes; set aside to cool completely. When the resulting pomegranate and sugar syrup has cooled, whisk in the heavy cream and refrigerate for several hours until very cold. Churn according to ice cream machine’s instructions.

*Note: To extract the juice from the pips, I use a potato ricer.

Honey-Rose Gelato Recipe

https://i0.wp.com/farm4.static.flickr.com/3253/3105430111_b3ff253652.jpg

Take 2 cups of whole milk and infuse it with fresh rose petals.  I infuse the milk for at least 2 weeks before I make it.  The milk will take on a very light pink color, almost not visible.  If you don’t have fresh rose petal, rose preserves work but don’t give you the scent of going fresh.
Heat the infused milk in a pan with 1 cup of sugar (preferably fine white) and 1/4 cup of powdered milk.
Most recipes call for 4 egg yolks but I prefer the creamy consistency so I use 8 egg yolks.  Separate them and hand whisk until they’re thick.  If you use an electric mixer, don’t overmix.
Add the HALF of the hot milk mixture to the eggs, slowly.  Whisk constantly to blend it all nicely.
Once that hot milk mixture and egg yolks are mixed, pour it all back into the remaining hot milk mixture in the pot.  Mix it to a gravy-like consistency and keep mixing until your thermometer reads 170 degrees.  Don’t go hotter or colder.
Add a full cup of heavy whipping cream and mix gently.  Then refridgerate the entire mixture for 48 hours.
To add rose texture, I use handy candied rose petals, about 1 cup.  You can also buy these at the store.  I chop them up into very thin strips (they’ll look like little toothpicks almost) and throw them into the mixture.
Pour the mixture into your ice cream maker.  As you watch it thicken, you can add honey slowly so it mixes into the gelato but doesn’t blend.  You’ll get nice strips of honey to offset the bitter rose flavor.
After it’s at the proper thickness, freeze the mixture for 48 hours, preferably at just under 60 degrees.
Serve as fast as possible from the freezer.  If you have problems with the gelato sticking too much, you can try it again with a pinch of xanthan gum.  This is effected by the temperature of your fridge, your ice cream maker and your freezer.



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99 Things to Eat in L.A. Before You Die via [laweekly]


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Fugu to foie gras, pizza to panuchos

By Jonathan Gold

View more photos in Anne Fishbein’s “99
Things to Eat in L.A. Before You Die” slideshow.

The theme of this issue is somewhat morbid. We’ll admit to that.
We were going to call it “99 Things to Eat in L.A. Before You Move to
San Diego,” but it didn’t have the same ring of finality. You could
probably drive up from San Diego if you were really, really in the mood
for a maple-bacon biscuit but from beyond the grave? I’m afraid our
metaphysics isn’t quite up to that one. 

https://i2.wp.com/blogs.laweekly.com/squidink/99things2.jpg

PHOTO BY ANNE FISHBEIN
https://i1.wp.com/vvoice.vo.llnwd.net/e8/99-things-to-eat-in-l-a-before-you-die.4479934.40.jpg
Border Grill’s green corn tamales

And as long as we’re on the subject of
metaphysics, we will also confess to being a bit judgmental, because
judgmental is what we do around here. If we’re suggesting that some
things — 99 things — are on this particular list, we’re also suggesting
that others are not. A Tito’s taco:
Eat before you die. A Pink’s
hot dog? You’re on your own.

See — you’ve barely started reading and we’ve already absolved
you of the responsibility of standing in line behind Leonardo
DiCaprio. You’ve already recouped the entire cost of the issue,
and then some.

To eat, perchance to dream, in no particular order.

Urasawa’s Fugu

Eat before you die? If you get it from the wrong guy, blowfish can be
what you taste rather immediately before you expire — tetrodotoxin,
the nerve agent concentrated in the innards, is enough to paralyze a
charging bull elephant, and is rumored to be the agent used to turn men
into zombies. Usually, we satisfy our fugu cravings at Dae Bok, the
Koreatown specialist that cooks the blowfish into a spicy, garlicky
stew, but everybody should experience, at least once, the translucent
petals of fugu sashimi prepared by Hiro Urasawa
in its early spring season. But be warned: If the toxins won’t get you,
the size of the check just may. Urasawa, 218 N. Rodeo
Drive, Beverly Hills. (310) 247-8939.

Bulgarini’s Goat’s Milk Gelato

Los
Angeles is a world capital of so many things, including, it turns
out, goat’s milk ice cream. Delicieuse, in Redondo Beach,
is the most obvious source, sporting reams of literature about the
health benefits of goat’s milk and eight flavors of ice cream made with
the stuff, all of them delicious but none of them particularly goaty.
And then there’s Leo Bulgarini, the Zen gelato master of Altadena,
who amps up the strong, animal taste of his goat’s milk gelato by
tossing goat cheese into the mix along with a handful of toasted,
unsweetened cacao nibs for maximum pungency — it’s petting-zoo gelato,
gelato you can almost imagine nibbling on your sleeves. Leo recommends
that you pair it with a glass of rose prosecco from Valdobbiadene. Bulgarini
Gelato, 749 E. Altadena Drive, Altadena. (626) 791-6174.

Romanesco

If you’ve been to a local farmers market midwinter, you’ve probably
seen these things — lumpy, glowing, pale-green vegetables, the size of
footballs bisected on their horizontal axes, plunked down near the
counter at any Weiser Family Farms stand. If you’re at the Pasadena
farmers market, there may be a Caltech student or two nearby, admiring
the peculiar geometry of the vegetable; fractal pyramids flowing in
tight logarithmic spirals, cruciferous Fibonacci series, galaxies
expressed in the medium of cauliflower. Nudge the postdocs out of the
way and take one home. Made into a salad with pureed anchovies, roasted
whole with a dribble of olive oil or sliced and sautéed with garlic and
capers, the nutty, deep-flavored Romanesco is the queen of winter
vegetables. weiserfamilyfarms.com.

San Nak Ji

I have read more about cephalopod nervous systems in the last couple
of years than most of the people of my acquaintance, and I’m still not
sure about the morality of eating this dish — which is to say, the
tentacles of a humanely dispatched octopus, served chopped and still
wiggling on a platter. The predominant school of thought states that the
tentacles move purely by reflex, like beheaded chickens or the
twitching frog legs many of us encountered in high school biology.
Another theory, which begins to make sense when your next bite starts to
crawl up your chopsticks, claims that the octopus brain is rather
decentralized, and that the suckers adhering to the roof of your mouth
are still very much alive. Imagine a dish so delicious that it
occasionally outweighs pretty serious ethical concerns. That’s san
nak ji. Masan, 2851 W.
Olympic Blvd., Koreatown. (213) 388-3314.

Sherry Yard’s Kaiserschmarrn

Everybody who hasn’t been to Spago since the 1980s knows exactly what
to get there — pizza, chopped Chino Ranch vegetables, and pasta with
goat cheese and broccoli. They’re the dishes that made California
cuisine famous, that fed Hollywood and made Wolfgang Puck
America’s first celebrity chef. Except that Spago hasn’t really served
those dishes in a while: Puck’s and Lee Hefter’s
palates lean more toward the Austrian palette than toward the pizza
party, and the one dish that has remained on the menu for the last dozen
years has been the beet layer cake with goat cheese and pumpkinseed
oil. Which leaves longtime Spago pastry chef Sherry Yard’s
Kaiserschmarrn, an ethereal, fluffy pancake served with strawberries.
What does Tony Curtis
have in common with Emperor Franz
Josef I? Do you even have to ask? Spago, 176 N. Cañon Drive,
Beverly Hills. (310) 385-0880.

Tito’s Old-School Tacos

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | Next Page >>



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