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Archive for Gucci

Fragrance Reviews and Film Trailer for Gucci Guilty via [elle, mimifroufrou and socialitesanonymous]

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Gucci Guilty

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Gucci is taking a new approach to fragrance promotion.  The Italian fashion powerhouse has created a film to promote their new fragrance Gucci Guilty.  Check out the trailer for the film below:

Frank Miller’s “Gucci Guilty” Commercial Starring Evan Rachel Wood and Chris Evans

Starring Evan Rachel Wood and Chris Evans.
Directed by Frank Miller.
Soundtrack by Friendly Fires.

Also, click here to enter to win a VIP trip to the MTV VMA‘s and meet Evan Rachel Wood and Chris Evans for a night of Guilty Pleasures with Gucci!

-AL

Gucci Guilty, it turns out, carries a message with it which is at the antipodes of a Catholic guilt trip. Turning the fallen-Eve concept on its head, Gucci is launching a perfume which is advertised starting with these words “The Guilty woman is...” Not “This woman is guilty of…”

“The Guilty woman is a glamgirl, daring and audacious; she likes to seduce; she is perceived as sexy. She is obsessed by fashion; she likes to go out and party; she only thinks about gratifying herself. Gucci Guilty…never feel guilty taking pleasure!”…

The fragrance is described as a floral oriental.

I tested it a bit the other day. For now, I’ll confirm that it has a very sexy drydown. In a previous tweet, I said in an early reaction to it that it is “a subtle, sexy, feminine signature rather than a big-statement perfume. Great bottle which can be used as a mirror.” Later that day, I thought that I should have added the terms “very sexy,” and that the name “Guilty”, with its sulfurous connotation, now made more sense. But here the sexy feeling deepens rather than jumps on you in the opening stage.

Notes:  mandarin, pink pepper, peach, lilac, geranium, amber and patchouli.

The advert featuring actress and singer Rachel Evan Wood is supposed to be sizzling. I couldn’t help but think how much her makeup made me think of that of her boyfriend and now fiancé, Marilyn Manson.

See our previous post about it here.

Via tendance-parfums.com

Chris Evans and Evan Rachel Wood Promote Guilty

Gucci’s Frida Giannini launches the brand’s latest fragrance with a pop-art nod to American culture: Hollywood stars, fast cars, and high indulgence

By Rachel Rosenblit

Frida GianniniPhoto: Benoit Peverelli

Giannini wears her own Gucci dress and bracelet. See photos of Chris Evans and Evan Rachel Wood from the shoot below

Graphic novelist Frank Miller is often called a “visionary”—a loaded, hot-air term for many but nearly an understatement for him. He dreams up worlds we’ve never fathomed, like the anarchic, crime-ridden metropolis where prostitutes mobilize in his codirecting debut, Sin City, and refashions history into timeless allegory, as with the 480 b.c. Battle of Thermopylae, sensationalized to controversial effect in 300. His noir-camp aesthetic is gritty, base, and grandiose­—and when his drawings are brought to life on-screen, he exhausts the most cutting-edge CGI to re-create every outline, every hue. A film conceived by Miller is visual candy in the most magnificent way.

One world Miller has never dared enter is fashion, let alone fragrance. But Frida Giannini, Gucci’s creative director (and visionary in her own right) had big plans for Gucci Guilty, her new patchouli-based mandarin-lilac concoction for the “daring type—a woman who likes to take risks, not sit around and wait for things to happen,” she says. In Giannini’s four-year tenure, she’s known the payoffs of taking risks. Her fall collection mixed wintry monotones in whites and steel grays with nods to postmodern whimsy: camel hair combined with neoprene, leather woven with fox fur. It drew a fluid line between sensuality and strength: a tight, body-conscious dress with cutouts and, not two looks later, an androgynous-cool tomboy trouser suit. Giannini’s Gucci girl is a lover of classics with touches of flash, a boho hippie beholden to luxury. But where fashion fantasies leave off, the allure of fragrance can pick up, flush with the promise of sense memory, lust, and covetable identity. To capture a milieu of Guilty-ness—worthy of inspiring the most irresistible transgressions—Giannini didn’t want just an ad campaign; she wanted a graphic novel turned 3-D short film, an auteur’s take on fantasy in the guise of a 60-second commercial.

“Frank Miller is absolutely unique,” Giannini says. “He designed an entire city around Gucci Guilty. I received the storyboards directly from him and could immediately see his vision. I could smell the streets in the movie.”

Action: Driving a white ’53 Jaguar, a woman clad in tight black leather speeds across a skyscraper-flanked bridge to the hauntingly remixed electropop of Depeche Mode’s “Strangelove” (“I give in to sin/ Because you have to make this life livable…”). She screeches to a halt, steps out of the car (close-up on her Gucci leather-and-croc platform stilettos), and flashes back to a pulse-pounding encounter between herself and a smoldering stranger in a bar.

The smoldering stranger is Chris Evans, the 29-year-old actor whose classic good looks and carved-from-granite pecs helped casting agents envision him as the chiseled comic book heroes in Fantastic Four, The Losers, and next year’s Captain America: The First Avenger. Evans spent the summer filming What’s Your Number?, a romantic comedy costarring Anna Faris, in his hometown of Boston, where his family and friends still live. “I missed my high school reunion because I was filming the ad for Gucci,” he says, “but I still hang out with every person I would’ve wanted to see. Nobody moved away; they’re all still dating each other. There’s something in the water.” Evans is close with his mom (“She’s quite a lady—a ballbuster. Real Boston”), cries at Legends of the Fall (“every time”), and loves “smelling something and immediately being taken somewhere,” he says, “like, Oh my God, it’s camp! Or—Jesus—third-grade gym!” Evans is a breath of charisma, a first date you’d love to have. But in Miller’s ad, he kills with just a look.

“He’s an exceptionally wholesome, sensitive guy, but his face becomes so powerful in front of the camera,” Giannini says.

“I’ve spent my whole career designing the hero,” Miller says, “and [Evans] seems to fit the shoes beautifully.”

Enter the femme fatale: Evan Rachel Wood, the 22-year-old Golden Globe–nominated actress and star of Thirteen, The Wrestler, and Across the Universe. Choosing Wood to be the Guilty one was a slick move on Giannini’s part: Not only is she “such a talented and beautiful girl,” as Giannini says, but she brims with intrigue, famous for her unsubtly subversive transformation from a perky blond actress with a wide smile to a mysterious pinup girl with a penchant for blood red lips and black tattoos. Now engaged to Marilyn Manson, Wood starred in the singer’s “Heart-Shaped Glasses (When the Heart Guides the Hand)” video as a wide-eyed fan who has sex with Manson amid a downpour of blood.

“Guilty is about a guilty pleasure,” Wood says. “Full throttle, living in the moment, living dangerously. A girl with a bit of wild side. Scent plays a big role in what you’re turned on by. When you fall in love with someone, and you take a piece of their clothing or smell that pillow—it kills you.”

Wood recently finished filming HBO’s upcoming ’30s-set miniseries Mildred Pierce, a remake of the 1945 film noir starring Joan Crawford, an actress Wood says she’s “idolized my whole life.” Crawford didn’t exactly comprise a tidy Hollywood package, and neither does Wood—but no one could deny either woman’s devotion to her livelihood. By channeling the same fierce integrity that they would bring to a feature film, Wood, Miller, and Evans have lent Gucci’s newest fragrance an inextricable artfulness.

“A guiding rule of mine was that there would be nothing that wouldn’t be gorgeous—the car, the woman, the buildings,” Miller says. “I was on the lookout for the tiniest speck of anything that would’ve looked less than lovely. With Frida on the set, I hardly had to—she’s got an eagle eye. She knows exactly what she wants.”

“I think everyone, in the past, has had a moment—something romantic or sexy or sensual—that lasts for the rest of their lives,” Giannini says. “That’s the provocation for the commercial: the essence of the strong experience. I hope these images will stay in people’s minds for a long time.”

Below, the stars of the Gucci Guilty campaign, shot for ELLE.

On her: Python lace-embroidered shiftdress, $4,795, printed stockings, $95, white gold charm bracelet, $525, white gold and diamond horse-bit bracelet, price upon request, all, Gucci, at select Gucci stores nationwide. Her own ring. On him: Dress shirt, $355, wool pants (sold with matching suit jacket), $2,650, both, Gucci, call 800-456-7663.

Photographed by Dan King





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Why Are the Top Luxury Websites Incompatible With Apple iPad? via [psfk.com]

Top 10 Luxury Brands’ Sites Fail To Work On iPad

A review by the team at PSFK shows that most luxury brands are
unprepared to leverage the changes in web use that products like
Apple’s iPad and iPhone are driving. Out of the top 10 luxury brands
ranked by Forbes in 2009, none of their websites worked
sufficiently to match their desktop-web-experience. Only Gucci seems to have
created a site that can handle the technology requirements that Apple has placed on its
mobile devices.

The key issue is that all the key luxury brands have designed their
sites to use Adobe’s Flash. Flash offers an animated but
controlled web-design experience but Apple’s Steve jobs has said
that the iPad
and iPhone
will not use Flash software partly because of the drain it puts onto
battery life.

Apple has sold an estimated 1 million iPads in the first month. The
world’s luxury brands seem to be failing to keep up with a gadget
loving shopper who will spend between $500 and $1,000 on what may
consider as a supplemental device for a user. Later this month Apple
will start taking orders for the iPad from key luxury markets like
Japan. Apple has already cornered 46% of the smartphone market in Japan
and the world’s most mobile web savvy audience are bound to lap up
Apple’s new tablet.

When viewed through the iPad, many of the luxury brands’ websites
simply fail to load and instead ask the user to download Flash – a
request which is not an option for the device’s owner. Three brands of
the top 10 offer a store locator but the Chanel’s offering is
so poorly designed (read: not even contemplated) that it looks like it
was created for the worldwide web of 1993.

Brands need to realize that the iPad offers a different experience.
While some have invested in Apps to overcome the iPhone’s limitation –
the fairly light iPad with its 9 inch screen brings some focus back to
the browser driven web. Several commentators have suggested that the
change the way people will consume entertainment in the home but
research that the PSFK
consultancy team
has conducted for leading corporations has shown
that the device will fuel online retail too.

Unlike the cumbersome laptop, the iPad is a device that can used
while the user simultaneously enjoys other entertainment options like
watching TV. Brands and retailers need to create tablet friendly
electronic catalogs that allow people to browse as they’re curled up on a
sofa with the TV flickering in the background.

PSFK Review Of Top 10 Luxury Brands On The iPad:


Prada

Prada On The iPad

Nothing. Just a Flash logo.

Fendi

Fendi On The iPad

Fails to load. A message requests users to download Flash – an option
that is not available for iPad users.

Moet & Chandon

moet

Fails to load. A message requests users to download Flash – an option
that is not available for iPad users.

Cartier

cartier site doesn't load on the ipad

Nothing.

Hennessy

hennessy site doesnt load on the ipad

Fails to load. A message in various languages requests users to
download Flash – an option that is not available for iPad users.

Rolex

rolex site does not load on the ipad

Fails to load. A message in various languages requests users to
download Flash – an option that is not available for iPad users.


Channel

IMG_0010

IMG_0011

IMG_0013

Main page fails to function. The store listings have no design
element.


Gucci

Gucci On The iPad1

Gucci On The iPad1

Gucci On The iPad1

Gucci On The iPad1

Gucci On The iPad1

The store appears to function well and purchases can be made. Videos
are not viewable as they are currently served by Flash.


Hermes

Hermes On The iPad1

Hermes On The iPad1

Hermes On The iPad1

The brand messaging and store locator sections of the site fail to
load. The ecommerce store operates but images of the products fail to
appear.

Louis
Vuitton

Louis Vuitton On The iPad1

Louis Vuitton On The iPad1

Louis Vuitton On The iPad
A
basic site is offered with warning messages throughout asking the user
to download Flash. The catalog works but there is no purchase option.



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OpuluxeLtd.com Luxury Lifestyle Special Report: Platinum Brands via [Forbes]

Beyond The Balance Sheet: Platinum Brands

Christina Settimi and Kurt Badenhausen

The most valuable luxury brands will shine in a recovery.

image

In Pictures: Platinum Brands

To some, BMW seemed a bit out of touch with hard times when it rolled out an exuberant ad campaign called “Joy” this year. Turns out, the ad campaign is in tune with the opportunities BMW and other luxury brand makers anticipate as the recession fades.

Last year was the worst year ever for global luxury goods, with worldwide sales falling 8%. But in a look at the world’s most valuable luxury brands, Forbes identifies 10 that are poised to thrive in better economic times. These brands, including BMW and Louis Vuitton, share some qualities that help keep them strong even when wealthy consumers are curtailing spending.

The companies behind these brands emphasize their products’ quality, longevity and pleasure-giving features through marketing efforts that make it likely these brands will continue to do well, especially if luxury sales around the world grow by 4% to $210 billion this year, as predicted by Bain & Co., the Boston-based consulting firm.

Feng Li/Getty Images

Close

No. 10: Porsche

Parent Company: Porsche
Brand Value: $4.8 billion
Brand Sales: $8.7 billion

Statia Photography/Getty Images for Cartier

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No. 9: Cartier

Parent Company: Richemont
Brand Value: $5.4 billion
Brand Sales: $3.3 billion

Currently with 32 boutiques in 18 cities across China, Cartier CEO Bernard Foras has said he aims to make China its No. 1 market in three years with at least 55 boutiques.

FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

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No. 8: Rolex

Parent Company: Rolex
Brand Value: $5.5 billion
Brand Sales: $3.4 billion

Rolex is the most profitable brand in watches. Sales are expected to be up 15% this year, fueled by sales in emerging markets led by China according to analyst Jon Cox of Kepler Capital Markets.

PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images

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No. 7: Chanel

Parent Company: Chanel
Brand Value: $5.6 billion
Brand Sales: $3.3 billion

Coco Chanel’s mantra: “Fashion fades, only style remains the same” is still the guiding force behind her brand. But what is equally important to Chanel’s appeal is its creative director, Karl Lagerfeld, one of the most recognizable men in fashion with his silver ponytail, dark sunglasses and black suit.

LIU JIN/AFP/Getty Images

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No. 6: Hermes

Parent Company: Hermes
Brand Value: $5.7 billion
Brand Sales: $2.5 billion

The infamous waiting list for the Birkin bag, which retails between $6,000 and $100,000, is history for the 173-year old company. The company now aims to grow by expanding its customer base. It opened its first men’s only store in New York in February with a made-to-measure program aimed at providing custom apparel.

AP Photo/Jeff Chiu

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No. 5: Coach

Parent Company: Coach
Brand Value: $7.4 billion
Brand Sales: $3.2 billion

Coach’s strategy to cut prices last year–a move that resulted in it offering more than half of its products for under $300–paid off. Sales volume jumped and profits surged. The company is now focusing on middle-price-range products, and expanding its new pricing strategy in Europe.

CHRISTOPHE SIMON/AFP/Getty Images

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No. 4: Gucci

Parent Company: PPR
Brand Value: $8.2 billion
Brand Sales: $3.0 billion

With a new CEO at the helm last year, Gucci unveiled a brand strategy that included cutting production and multiple variations of the same style. It launched a new ad campaign promoting the brand’s heritage that featured Guccio Gucci describing his dream as an artist in Florence in 1921.

AP Photo/Joerg Sarbach

No. 3: Mercedes-Benz

Parent Company: Daimler AG
Brand Value: $18.8 billion
Brand Sales: $63.2 billion

While many automakers advertise price cuts, Mercedes emphasizes its company’s heritage: Its cars are the result of 100 years of German engineering. It is currently vying with BMW to be the biggest luxury auto brand in China and says it plans on outselling its German nemesis by 2011 with a number of cars designed exclusively for Chinese consumers.

AP Photo/Christophe Ena

No. 2: Louis Vuitton

Parent Company: LVMH
Brand Value: $19.0 billion
Brand Sales: $6.3 billion

In its 156 years, Louis Vuitton has held steadfast to a policy of zero discounting–a practice it says enriches the value of the brand. To remind its customers what they are paying for, the new brand campaign features artisans hand-finishing goods at a workshop table.

AP Photo/Grace Kassab

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No. 1: BMW

Parent Company: BMW
Brand Value: $19.9 billion
Brand Sales: $56.6 billion

BMW is gaining market share in China, the largest auto market in the world, by designing custom cars to meet the demands of Chinese consumers and tailoring its advertising to align with Chinese culture.

Few brands can sell luxury as a necessity and get away with it like Porsche. A recent ad for the new Porsche 911 reads: “…You strain to think of something else that has stayed this true to its ideals for 46 years. You come to the realization that, in the age of the superfluous and superficial, the unrooted and the unserious, the 911 is necessary. Very necessary. The Porsche 911. There is no substitute.”

Forbes’ Beyond the Balance Sheet department looks at the numbers behind the numbers–or ways of analyzing companies that are different from the usual metrics, such as book value and earnings. To identify the Platinum Brands among luxury goods, we looked at more than 30 leading brands in autos, retail, fashion and accessories to determine the world’s most valuable. We leaned on Jeffrey Parkhurst, managing director of business strategy at WPP ( WPPGY news people )-owned media agency Mindshare, to help value these brands.

The first step was to determine earnings before interest and taxes for each brand. Forbes averaged those earnings over the past three years and subtracted from earnings a charge of 8% of the brand’s capital employed, figuring a generic brand should be able to earn at least 8% on the capital employed.

Forbes applied the maximum corporate tax rate to that net earnings figure. Next, it allocated a percentage of those earnings to the brand based on the role that brands play in that industry. Brands are crucial when it comes to apparel and perfumes, but not so much, say, with airlines. Pricing and location are more important for them. To this net brand earning number, we applied the average price-to-earnings multiple over the past three years to arrive at the final brand value. For privately held outfits we applied an earnings multiple for a comparable company.

Beyond The Balance Sheet: Platinum Brands

pic

In Pictures
Featured

The companies that came out on top on our list of most valuable luxury brands fared reasonably well last year, one that was disastrous for many companies. Sales of Louis Vuitton, the marquee label of parent company LVMH, rose more than 10% in 2009 to $6.3 billion, despite the recession. Brand sales, which represent 75% of the fashion and leather goods segment of the company, had double-digit growth in the first quarter as well.

What helps set some of these brands apart? The makers of the world’s top luxury brands don’t apologize for the sky-high price tags attached to their products. LVMH’s Louis Vuitton, for one, has never discounted a single item, citing customer loyalty and product value as its reasons. That makes sense: Why would a customer pay full price for an item if they knew that in three months it might be had for 25% less?

Even when the top luxury companies introduce less expensive offerings, they often don’t advertise the price. When Mercedes-Benz introduced its C-Class, its most affordable sedan, it emphasized that it is a product of 100 years of German engineering, a key brand message. And most of the most valuable brands kept advertising during the recession: Louis Vuitton, for one, rolled out a celebrity-flecked campaign. In one print ad, dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov stands on a platform barefoot while photographer Annie Leibovitz watches him from the floor.

The makers of the world’s most valuable luxury brands know that a good portion of their future sales will come from emerging markets, especially China, where sales in the luxury goods market expected to increase 15% there this year, says Bain.

“With Asia being the growth market for luxury players, brands will tailor their product offerings to meet the needs of more diverse customer segments,” says Claudia D’Arpizio, Milan-based partner at Bain.

Research by Ritika Sinha



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Haute Couture Sweets: A great gift for the Fashionista with Cookie Fetish via [Trend de La Creme]

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Cookie Couture: Almost Too Pretty To Eat

When you’re surrounded by fashionistas, it’s near impossible to buy gifts for birthdays, holidays, etc. that they’ll truly appreciate. (Personal style is such a bitch!) But in my experience, you can never go wrong with cookies — especially cookies as fashionable as these.

Assorted Couture Cookies from gumdropcookieshop.com

Assorted Designer Handbag Cookies from elenis.com

Assorted Fashion Show Cookies from cookiepursonality.com

Louis Vuitton and Hermes Handbag Cookies from bakedideas.com

Chanel Handbag Cookies from flourpotcookies.com