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Archive for ecoLuxe

Cheap & Chic DIY ecoLuxe Headboards via [lovely undergrad, copycat chic, curbly,and allthingsgd]

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One of the easiest ways to spruce up a boring bedroom is by dressing up the bed. But pillows, bedsheets, and a pretty comforter only go so far. Here are some diy headboard ideas so that you can give your bed a little extra ooomph!

Above: For this “Tall Order” headboard featured at BHG (Better Homes & Gardens), an inexpensive artist’s canvas was covered in fabric and propped behind the bed. I particularly like this project because the canvas could be re-covered if you want to change you color scheme or it could moved around the room if you no longer wish to use it as a headboard. I do think, however, that it should be fastened to the wall in some way to avoid falling on your head during sleep. Some kind of adhesive hooks might just do the trick?
Above: If you’re feeling especially ambitious or crafty, a diy-upholstered headboard may be just the project for you. Click here for BHG instructions on creating this luxe headboard using medium-density fiberboard, batting, and your choice of fabric. (Apparently it takes only three hours and no special tools are required!)
Above: This “Letter Perfect” headboard shown on BHG is dedicated to all you bookworms and future novelists out there. Collect new or vintage letters of varying sizes and colors flea markets, antique shops, and craft-stores… and put ’em up on the wall with some double-sided tape, poster putty, or adhesive hooks (depending on the material and weight of your letter).
Above: Hey, globetrotters… you may like BHG’s “Map Quest” headboard project. Simply use decoupage medium to adhere paper road maps to an old headboard. (Note: Do not, under any circumstances, decoupage the dorm-provided headboard… it will damage the school’s furniture.) For a dorm-safe approach I would recommend either doing this to a headboard you own and bringing it to school… or decoupaging a flat piece of plywood and temporarily attaching it to the headboard the school provided you with.
Above: Add some timeless romance to your dorm by borrowing the “Screen Star” idea from BHG. Simply place a folding screen between your headboard and the wall. Wrought iron is always gorgeous, but there are a variety of screen available out there. Plus, a vertical screen will draw the eye upward.
Above: BHG’s “Perfectly Padded” idea is a new take on the old upholstered headboard. I absolutely adore this idea. Simply hang a bench cushion by it’s ties from wall-mounted hooks. I think those adhesive hooks are pretty much ideal for this project. (Just make sure that they are all attached to the wall at the same level so that your cushion isn’t crooked.) You could also put a twist on this diy by hanging the cushion over the long part of your bed instead of at the headboard. It could give your bed a daybed like.
Above: Isn’t this BHG project pretty? This “Elegant Illusion” also happens to be a piece of cake. While you’re not allowed to paint the walls at school, vinyl decals are a great alternative. I’m sure if you shop around you’ll be able to find a vinyl headboard decal. Or you could stick other decals to the wall and create your own idea of a headboard. I think one of those chandelier silhouette decals would be quite eye-catching over a bed.
Above: So this BHG idea, called “Pop of Color“, is the easiest, most convenient, and easiest headboard project. So if you’re not crafty, on a small budget, or simply change your mind a lot… give this diy a chance. Simply drape a panel of fabric over the headboard. Then tuck the ends under the mattress to keep it in place. Yup… it’s that easy. With several pieces of pretty, patterned fabric on hand, you could change your headboard’s look on a whim.

Above: This “Paper Headboard” from I heart Norwegian Wood on Flickr is super easy and super stylish. The headboard design was simply drawn onto and cut out of thick, white poster board and stuck to the wall.

Above: This “Scrapbook Paper” headboard (also from I heart Norwegian Wood) is what I’m leaning towards doing in my own dorm room. I was first inspired by a $13 Paper Wall, but it took some surfing around to find a photo of what I wanted to do… which is to attach scrapbook paper in different colors and patterns to the wall above my bed. I think I may go all the way up to the ceiling though in my room. This can be done by simply attaching scrapbook paper squares to the wall with double-sided tape, adhesive strips, or poster putty. 

Above: I love the headboard in this bedroom belonging to Flickr user kimhas6cats. It’s a different take on using a screen as a headboard. It’s her screen that’s really the key. It seems that it was just made for hanging things… like scarves, artwork, etc. It’s really quite a fabulous idea. And considering I personally own over twenty scarves… I’m keeping my eyes open for a screen like this. Imagine all the other things you could hang from it! So many possibilities.

Final Word:

If you’re creative, crafty, and innovative… there is a variety of ways to customize your bed and your dorm in general. But I do stress over and over again that it’s soooo important to read your residence hall contract and handbook so that you know what you are allowed to do decor-wise in the dorm and what is prohibited. Every college has different rules. If you don’t understand something in the contract or handbook, e-mail your residence hall director or dormitory staff. Be informed, be safe, and be creative. 🙂

I’m going to call attention to a couple of my favorite blogger DIY projects. These ladies both made their own gorgeous headboards inspired by designer beds for a substantial savings! What’s not to love? I’m seriously considering making myself a new headboard, even though the one I have is less than a year old….lol.

First up, we have Freckles Chic with her awesome linen headboard with nailhead trim. Cost of making this headboard? Only $73!

Looks pretty similar to West Elm’s Nailhead Upholstered Headboard…King size = $449.

Next, Holly over at Life in the Fun Lane made a glamorous white headboard (directions here)in keeping with her unique clean cottage chic style. Just love it!

This is an easy and cheap way to get a headboard that looks like Williams Sonoma Home’s Fairfax Bed with out the pocket emptying cost!

Yeah yeah, we’ve all seen enough headboards, right? Well, imagine this long upholstered headboard with a queen sized bed in front of it and two sparse, but interesting side tables on either side of it. It would function as a headboad, of course, but also as wall art across a wide expanse of wall. That’s been on my drawing board for a long time, and now someone has gone and done it. As usual  Cococozy has compiled a nice little assortment of fantastic photos of  yet more headboard alternatives for your consideration.

created at: 06/03/2010



created at: 06/03/2010

Above: Decal Wall Stickers Headboard (those with patience could paint this)

Block of Blue Headboard

created at: 06/03/2010

Photo by Eric Roth

Wingback Headboard

created at: 06/03/2010

Photo: Richard Powers

Floral Screen Headboard

created at: 06/03/2010

Photo: Polly Wreford

I received a reader request from my fabulous friend Beth who’d like to see some DIY headboard options for her darling daughter Maya. Well ladies, here’s what I was able track down–hope you see something you like!

The first thing that came to mind is a DIY headboard made from a piece of picket fence. My mother-in-law did this in her guest room and I just love it. Nice and simple, and oh so cute. Unfortunately I don’t have any photos from my mother-in-law’s house, but here is one from Better Homes & Gardens. I also found a slight variation at HGTV.com.


Another great idea is this simple DIY canopy, which would be so cute for a little girl’s room–and you could change out the fabric as she grows and her tastes mature!


The fun fabric and shape of this charming DIY upholstered headboard keeps it looking young and playful.


Another simple great idea–again from Better Homes & Gardens. This headboard is made from plain old bi-fold closet doors painted with stripes.


I love this chic suggestion from Domino–painting a faux headboard right on your wall using a color just a couple shades lighter than your wall color. Don’t want to buy a whole other can of paint? Just mix some white paint with your existing wall color paint and you’re good to go.


Although not necessarily what comes to mind for my friend’s daughter Maya, here are two more ideas from BHG that I just love–Pic 1 is made from a painted paneled door, and Pic 2 is made with weathered shutters.

As you may have noticed by now–Better Homes & Gardens is an excellent site for finding some beautiful DIY headboard ideas! To see these DIY headboard ideas and more, check out their slide show of 29 Cheap & Chic Headboard Projects.

And if anyone has any other great ideas for Beth’s daughter, we’d love to hear them!


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AWESOME Lady GaGa Worthy Herbivorous Haute Couture Bio-Fashions via [greenopolis]

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Haute Cuisine Meets Haute Couture With Bio-Fashion

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Sebrina Smith
by LiteGreen

Crane sees the future of fashion as a time when materials and resources could be severely restricted because of their environmental impact, and she hopes edible clothing will provide an alternative.

Lady Gaga’s Meat Dress aside, for many of us, the idea of wearable food peaked with edible panties.  But, if you understand how intrinsically wasteful the fashion industry is, and you could have a dress that used fewer valuable resources to make you look good, would you wear a dress made of Gelatin?

Emily Crane, a student at London’s Kingston University, is betting that you would.

Crane sees the future of fashion as a time when materials and resources could be severely restricted because of their environmental impact, and she hopes edible clothing will provide an alternative.

Crane calls her creations Micro-Nutrient Couture, a blending of shelf-staples, chemistry and imagination, cooked up in her London kitchen.

“I experiment with materials that occur naturally when cooked up from edible ingredients,” Crane writes at her web site, “including gelatines, kappa carrageenan, agar-agar sea vegetable, water, natural flavor extracts, glycerine, food coloring and lusters. This is high-tech kitchen couture.”

Crane’s work is an exotic part of Kingston University’s display during London Fashion Week.  And the reviews have been positive. Enough so that Crane envisions a day when each of us can buy a kit to make our own edible outfits at home.

So can we look forward to a day when we’ll attend a dinner party where dessert might be served right off the hostess’ back?  “Why not?”, says Crane.  “Let the banquet begin.”

Vintage Fashion Mannequins are Repurposed into Glamorous Vegas Showgirl Lamps via [Las Vegas Sun]

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Ladies of the light

Artist brings new radiance to vintage mannequins

ImageLeila Navidi

By Kristen Peterson

Two yeas ago Joe Clark, an antiques collector and longtime prop artist for Siegfried & Roy, was dressing a vintage mannequin with a vintage lampshade and flower petals made of abalone.

He added a light bulb. In walked Cindy Funkhouser.

“I have to have that,” said Funkhouser, an antiques dealer. “I don’t care how much it is, I want that. And can you make 10 more?”

The lamps that Clark made for his first show in the back gallery at the Funk House were a smash. Outlandish and topped with vintage accoutrements, the works came to be known as “art lamps,” functional artistic compositions of vintage wares, each with its own theme. The first lamps sold for as much as $2,000. Clark, a Massachusetts native who moved to Las Vegas 18 years ago, was launched as an artist.

Now he’s returned with another series, “So Rare II,” on display at the Fallout Gallery on Commerce Street.

In the sitting room of his 1935 Las Vegas bungalow, a dimly lighted and shadowy environment decked out with the finest rugs and antiques, Clark says he’s blown away by the reaction to his “ladies,” which were inspired by childhood memories of being dragged through department stores.

Built on his Moroccan coffee table surrounded by a 1930s sofa and chairs, the women still wear their original makeup.

They are sultry, sexy, vixenesque and glamorous, but not perfect.

“The chip on her chin. I don’t fix stuff like that,” Clark says. “There is something romantic about the flaws, the dings, the cracks; that all adds to the realness.”

But don’t expect a second-rate work. Clark puts all his love and some household appliances into crafting the sculptures. Like a dress designer who understands the line of a woman’s body, Clark understands his vintage mannequins and adjusts to their forms with strategically placed adornments.

A wedding cake lady lamp features a mannequin with a cake plate topping her head, a veil attached. Twinkling lights, Capodimonte porcelain roses and glass beads wrap around her body.

Another lady wears a Proctor Silex lighted electric coffee brewer atop a plate on her head. Dangling from the turquoise plate are matching coffee cups.

A 1944 telephone serves as the base of another lamp. The receiver, which Clark says still works, stems from her head. A ’50s desk lamp, screwed into the head of the mannequin, lights it from above.

Another wears a brass art deco chandelier with twinkling flamelike red lights.

Sitting amid the lamps last week, Clark played a recording of the lamps’ theme song, “So Rare,” written by John Rufus Sharpe and Jerry Herst, and humorously explained that the ladies sometimes seem to have a relationship with one another. Laughing, his friend Douglas Sargeant, who assists with the lamps, added, “It’s very loud sometimes in here. It’s a real hen house.”

Some come with stories. Many of the hundreds of shells (conch shells, starfish, coral and more) affixed to a lamp that sold at Clark’s last show hold a little piece of paper with a note. The woman who owned the shells received them from men all over the world. For the headpiece, Clark took his bathroom light fixture, mounted it on the mannequin and placed the shell of a large sea urchin, which holds the light bulb, inside.

Clark says his years working with Siegfried & Roy at their show and at the Jungle Palace helped him hone his abilities. He regards the magicians, who gave him advice with props at the show, as mentors, but he credits his childhood and Americana for the inspiration.

“It’s fascinating to pull up some of these memories and create work from them.”




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DIY – “T-Shirt Flower Wedding Bouquet” via [bridescafe]

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OPULUXE Lounge GroovesPlayList

Hi Guys….I’m so excited to share the cutest DIY project with you today….”T-Shirt Flower Wedding Bouquet”. It is just to sweet….a totally “new twist” on wedding bouquets….our DIY is brought to us today by the oh-so-talented and sweet, Maize Hutton…..Maize is an AMAZING crafter and designer….I’m so happy that she stopped by to share one of her many meaningful and beautiful DIY projects with us…Enjoy!

Ingredients:

T-shirts
Scissors (regular and decorative scallop)
Needle & Coordinating Thread
Branches or Bark covered wire

Kraft Paper or brown paper sack)

Twine, lace or ribbon
Glue gun & glue


Directions:

For Each Flower:

1.  Cut 3 strips approximately 2” wide by 18” long or however big you’d like your flowers.  See other technique below for thicker flowers.

2.  Cut each strip along edge approximately 1/4″-1/2” leaving 1/2” at the other edge.

3.  Gather all 3 strips together matching uncut edge.

4.  With needle and thread, secure the three strips with a stitch.

5.  Start sewing layers together securing with a stitch while rolling into a flower.

6.  Continue sewing layers together securing with a stitch until you’ve reached the end of the strip.

7.  When complete, inside flower will have a ‘well’ for branch or wire to insert.

8.  Insert 1-2 drops of hot glue in flower well.  Stick in branch or bark covered wire for stem.

9.  Stitch around to secure flower to stem.

10.  Cut kraft paper using a decorative edge scissor or scallop scissor.  Wrap paper around flower bouquet.  Tie with twine, lace or ribbon to match your wedding colors.

Now you have a beautiful DIY wedding bouquet for the bride or bridesmaids!  You can also use these flowers as corsages by simply attaching a pin to the back instead of a stem.  You may also cut leaves and attach to the flowers as I’ve done in the finished bouquet.

Another technique is to cut the material 4 inches wide and fold in half, sewing the cut edge together with your sewing machine.  Then use your scissors to cut down the folded half and then cut the ¼” strips.  Follow the instructions by rolling the flower as described above.  This produces a thicker flower.

Have fun crafting and enjoy!

Maize….thanks SO much for sharing your work with us today…we look forward to your next visit…and guys, please head over to Maize’s blog site to see more of beautiful work!




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Futuristic Chinese Bus to solve traffic jams. via [huffpost]

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China Plans Huge Buses That Can DRIVE OVER Cars (PHOTOS)

China has overtaken the United States as the world’s biggest producer of greenhouse gases and biggest energy consumer.But the country is also thinking in big and bold ways when it comes to how it will reduce pollution and a new plan to build a “straddling bus” is among the most space-age schemes yet.

According to China Hush, the 6-meter-wide 3D Express Coach will be powered by a combination of electricity and solar energy, and will be able to travel up to 60 kilometers per hour carrying some 1200 to 1400 passengers.

>

IN PHOTOS: See more pictures of the futuristic bus here.



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8 Fruits You Can Grow Indoors via [msn/shine]

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{by Reader’s Digest Magazine,

From All-Season Guide to Gardening

If you have a spacious, airy sunroom, conservatory or glazed porch, you can grow a variety of potted fruits, including figs, citrus and grapes. Apricots and peaches often crop earlier and better under cover than outdoors, although they benefit from spending the warm summer months out in the garden, as do most types of fruit trees and shrubs.

With the exception of strawberries, most fruit-producing plants are trees or shrubs that need a deep and nutritious root run, so choose containers that are at least 1 foot (30 cm) in diameter and a little more in depth. As plants grow, move them into larger pots or small tubs. You can also root prune them each year to maintain a convenient size. Alternatively, for mature plants, remove just the top layer of soil in the pot and replace this with fresh compost each spring.

In general use a soil-based compost placed over a generous layer of drainage material such as earthenware crocks, pebbles or gravel. Water and feed regularly, especially while plants are bearing flowers and fruit, when a high-potash fertilizer is recommended.

https://i1.wp.com/l.yimg.com/jn/util/anysize/492*330l-86400,http%3A%2F%2Fa323.yahoofs.com%2Fphugc%2FR3l8QmkGIRwa%2Fphotos%2F6b2cbb07cbf89fbc841ab2b5e53cc981%2Fori_cceaac39892aef.jpg%3Fug_____Dmeh0Dg1O

{1.} Figs

All varieties fruit more heavily if their roots are confined to a large pot, but Negro Largo does particularly well as a houseplant. A temperature range of 55 to 65°F (13 to 18°C) can limit the mature size of the plant, but it may still be necessary to prune in summer and winter to control exuberant growth. Set in a well-lit spot away from direct sun, and feed the plant sparingly two or three times in the growing season.

https://i0.wp.com/media.rd.com/rd/images/rdc/books/all-season-guide-to-gardening/How-to-Grow-Edible-Houseplants/01-peaches-af.jpg

{2.} Peaches and Nectarines

Natural or genetically dwarf varieties such as bonanza (peach) and nectarella (nectarine) can be grown as short standards on 30-inch (75 cm) stems. Keep them indoors in a well-lit, sunny position in temperatures of 50 to 55°F (10 to 13°C) until fruit sets, when they will require higher temperatures of 65 to 70°F (18 to 21°C). Ventilate freely in warm weather.

https://i1.wp.com/www.stargazerperennials.com/images/alpine-strawberry-plant-wit_qb0q.jpg

{3.} Strawberries

Alpine strawberries in pots on a sunny windowsill will fruit almost continuously from early summer until mid-autumn. Large-fruited strawberries will also do well, and are especially valuable when forced to produce early fruit. To stimulate early strawberries, pot up plants in autumn in 5- to 6-inch (13 to 15 cm) pots and leave in a well-lit room. The plants should develop edible crops from late spring onwards, after which they can be discarded or planted out in the garden to grow on.

https://opuluxeltd.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/apricots.jpg?w=300

{4.} Apricots

Compact varieties such as Shipleys and Goldcot on semi-dwarfing St Julien A rootstocks are highly productive in pots, especially if they are trained against a sunny conservatory wall. For apricots, use a soil-less potting compost over plenty of drainage material. To ensure fruit, hand pollinate by transferring pollen from one flower to another with a paintbrush.

https://opuluxeltd.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/blackgrapes.jpg?w=225

{5.} Grapes

A vine provides shade and looks ornamental trained up walls and across the roof of a conservatory. Ventilate freely to prevent mildew spoiling the fruit. Each winter, shorten the sideshoots back to two buds.

https://i2.wp.com/static-p4.fotolia.com/jpg/00/13/54/33/400_F_13543370_8blvihOLX93vuRJtqmtDLTkwYWkCbQPa.jpg/

{6.} Mulberries

This slow-growing tree is ideal for a large pot. For tasty fruits that ripen in early summer, grow the black mulberry Morus nigra Chelsea in bright, indirect light in a well-ventilated spot, at 55 to 70°F (13 to 21°C).

https://i1.wp.com/farm4.static.flickr.com/3202/3057979225_1ece95878d.jpg

{7.} Cape Gooseberries

The cape gooseberry (Physalis pruinosa) and ground cherry (P. angulata) both make bushy pot plants, with small, tomato-like, white flowers and cherry-size, yellow or red fruits in papery husks. They are very prolific when grown in large pots, 1 foot (30 cm) or more across, in direct sunlight near a window.

https://i1.wp.com/www.jungleseeds.co.uk/SeedOrders/contents/media/PunicaGranatumNana.jpg

{8.} Dwarf Pomegranate

For pot cultivation, choose the small Punica granatum var. nana, which grows only 3 feet (90 cm) high and often produces its conspicuous scarlet flowers while relatively immature. Attractive miniature fruits follow in early autumn but seldom ripen. Plenty of ventilation and sunlight are needed, especially in late summer and autumn.





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Modern Houseboat Living via [msn/realestate]

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Life on a modern houseboat

By Abigail Peterson

A day in the life of a houseboat

Not everyone needs to spend a couple of weeks earning their sea legs
to feel at home. But that’s what happened to Matt and Jennifer Harvey
in January 2009, when they moved into a 1,000-square-foot modern prefab
houseboat on California’s Richardson Bay with their children, Jack and
Grace.

The transition wasn’t without trade-offs — including a major
downsizing of belongings — but when the sun is shining and the tide is
high, the family can’t imagine living anywhere else. “We open all the
windows and doors,” Matt Harvey says, “the breezes come in, and it’s
instantly summer.”



A  day in the life of a houseboat (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

7 a.m. – Wildlife watch

Matt and Jack Harvey enjoy aquariumlike views from the living room
window.

“Jack always says he’s looking for sharks and jellyfish out his
window, and it’s true, he really is — it’s not make-believe. Sometimes
we even wake up at night to the heavy breathing of seals surfacing
outside our bedroom window.” – Jennifer Harvey

7  a.m. - Wildlife watch (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

7:30 a.m. – Tide check

The Harveys live by the tide charts, their plans dictated by the
bay’s water level throughout the day.

“Out here, it’s like we’re in touch with a different measure of
time. It’s beautiful at high tide, when you’re floating and the water
is all around you, but then we appreciate the low tide too: The mud
summons the herons and sandpipers out to look for food.” – Matt Harvey

7:30 a.m. - Tide check (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

10:15 a.m. – Morning walk

Jennifer and Grace Harvey check for mail at the head of their dock,
the neighborhood hub.

“We’re definitely a community. In the city, you might know who lives
next door, but your neighbor two or three doors down? Sometimes this
much closeness can feel awkward, but it’s better — and healthier — than
the isolating urban alternative.”– Jennifer Harvey

10:15 a.m. - Morning walk (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

Noon – In to lunch

A superefficient kitchen means meals run smoothly.

“Ultimately, a tight kitchen is a huge advantage. I’m not running
back and forth all the time from the fridge to the counter to the
stove. I set up just what I need, and things go right in the dishwasher
when I’m done. It just seems natural to me now, that this is the way I
cook.” – Jennifer Harvey

Noon - In to lunch (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

3:40 p.m. – Land errands

Everything from the outside world must be carried in or, more often,
wheeled in via repurposed shopping carts from the marina parking lot.

“We live green by necessity. It’s a long dock, so it’s ‘pack it in,
pack it out.'” – Matt Harvey

3:40 p.m. - Land errands (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

5:10 p.m. – Friend by kayak

Jack Harvey thinks it’s totally normal that his best friend arrives
by boat for a get-together.

“Jack doesn’t even need to put on his shoes to go over to his
buddy’s house — he just needs his life jacket.” – Matt Harvey

5:10 p.m. - Friend by kayak (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

7:30 p.m. – Evening paddle

Matt and Jennifer Harvey enjoy after-dinner escapes on the water
near dusk, one of their favorite times of day.

“When dinner is finished and the kids are in bed, one of us will
grab the kayak and take a quick paddle around the neighborhood. It’s
peaceful, but it’s not exactly quiet. There are constant squeaks and
creaks and knocking from the boats and the gangways. That was something
we had to get used to when we first moved here.” – Matt Harvey

7:30 p.m. - Evening padde (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

8:35 p.m. – Impromptu soiree

With friends close by, impromptu gatherings are the rule.

“When the weather’s warm, we do a lot of, ‘Hey, we’re opening a
bottle of wine on the roof deck. Want to come over?’ We’ll sit and talk
and enjoy the night sky. Because we’re so far from the streets, there
are no lights above and you can really see the stars.” – Matt Harvey

8:35 p.m. - Impromptu soiree (© Thomas J. Story)

© Thomas J. Story

Making 1,000 square feet work for a family of four

  • Be strict about capacity. Reach a point of equilibrium with your
    stuff and stick with it. “Our kids know when they get a new thing, they
    have to say goodbye to something else,” Matt Harvey says.
  • Embrace imperfection. “I’m a cluttery person,” Jennifer Harvey
    says. “It’s when I stop pretending to be perfect and figure out a
    solution that the house works best.”
  • Store it where you use it. In the kitchen, oven mitts and spatulas
    are to the right of the stove, and the blender and mixer reside on the
    countertop where Jennifer Harvey bakes.
  • There’s always room for memories. “My grandmother’s waffle iron
    lives permanently on our stovetop,” Jennifer Harvey says. “I love it,
    so I make space for it, and we use it every day.”

Making 1,000 square feet work for a family of four (© Sunset)

© Sunset