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Archive for Cooking

Exotic and Spicy Ideas for a LAVISH Upscale Holiday Cocktail Party via [more.com]

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Sparkling cocktails, created by Kim Haasarud, Maria Hunt, and Gina Chersevani, and killer apps, created by Monica Bhide, make your holiday party elegant and effortlessly effervescent.

101645503
Photo: Kenji Aoki

Petal Power: Hibiscus Royale

A single crimson blossom soaked in syrup gives this bubbly cocktail its drama queen status. The grace note: a lacing of elderflower liqueur.

Makes 1 drink

1 hibiscus flower in syrup (from an 8.8-ounce, 11-flower jar of Wild Hibiscus Flowers in Syrup)*

1 teaspoon hibiscus syrup

4 ounces sparkling rosé, chilled

1 tablespoon St. Germain Elderflower Liqueur

Place the hibiscus flower and syrup in a Champagne flute or tall white-wine glass. Slowly add the sparkling rosé, and top off with the elderflower liqueur.

This drink is from Kim Haasarud, author of 101 Champagne Cocktails.

*Available at wildhibiscus.com or gourmet grocery stores.

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Photo: Kenji Aoki

Spoon Fed: Mango Salsa with Calamari Rings

Asian soupspoons let your cocktail party repertoire venture beyond traditional finger foods. Here each spoon serves a mouthful of fruity salsa tweaked with jicama, cumin and cilantro and topped with sautéed calamari rings.

Makes 20 appetizers

Salsa

1 teaspoon cumin seeds

1 small ripe mango, peeled and finely diced

1 small red onion, peeled and finely diced

½ small jicama, peeled and finely diced

2 tablespoons minced cilantro, plus extra for garnish

Juice of 1 lemon

Salt

Calamari

2 tablespoons olive oil

½ pound calamari rings, about ½ inch thick

Salt and pepper

20 Asian soupspoons

1. To make the salsa: Place a small skillet over medium heat. Add the cumin. Dry-roast for about 30 seconds, shaking spice frequently until fragrant. Remove from heat immediately. Grind in a spice grinder. Combine the cumin and remaining salsa ingredients, except salt, in a bowl. Mix well. Add salt to taste. Cover, and refrigerate until ready to serve. Salsa can be prepared up to 6 hours in advance.

2. To make the calamari: Heat a large skillet over high heat. Add the oil. When it shimmers, add the calamari rings. Sauté for 1 to 2 minutes, until the calamari are just cooked through. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

3. Divide the salsa evenly among the soup­spoons. Top each with calamari. Pour any juice over the rings. Garnish with minced cilantro.

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Photo: Kenji Aoki

Leaf Bed: Endive with Citrus Salad

Each sturdy, bite-size endive leaf holds a spoonful of sliced blood orange and sliced grapefruit. Red radishes deliver crunch and a peppery tang. The salad’s fresh, bright flavors come together in a lemony dressing spiced with jalapeño and mint.

Makes 24 appetizers

1 small grapefruit

1 small blood or navel orange

2 small red radishes, trimmed and diced

1 small jalapeño pepper, seeded and minced

2 tablespoons finely chopped mint leaves

2 tablespoons lemon juice

Pinch of salt

1 tablespoon honey

24 large, sturdy endive leaves

1. Supreme the citrus: Remove the grapefruit and orange peels. With a small sharp paring knife, segment the fruit, leaving behind the inner membrane. Cut each segment into 6 pieces, and place in a bowl.

2. Add the remaining ingredients except the honey and endive. Mix well. Cover, and refrigerate for about 2 hours to allow the flavors to blend. Before serving, allow the mixture to come to room temperature. Drain off the juice. Warm the honey slightly (for a few seconds in the microwave) so that it’s runny, and stir it into the salad. Taste, and adjust the salt.

3. Arrange the endive leaves on a platter. Using a teaspoon, evenly divide the salad among the leaves. (Each leaf should get a generous teaspoonful.)

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Photo: Kenji Aoki

Fire and Ice: Berry-Chile Fizz

Jalapeño pepper muddled with mint and sugar kicks up the heat in this spicy mojito. Stir in fresh lime juice, a (very) generous shot of rum, ice and club soda, and you won’t care whether it’s hot or cold outside.

Makes 1 drink

3 fresh mint sprigs

1 slice fresh jalapeño pepper

1½ tablespoons sugar

1 lime, halved

2 ounces light rum

Club soda, chilled

Cranberries for garnish

In a pint glass, muddle 2 of the mint sprigs, the jalapeño and sugar. Squeeze both halves of the lime into the glass, leaving a slice in the mixture. Add the rum, stir, and fill with ice. Top off with the club soda, and garnish with a mint sprig and a few whole cranberries.

This is from Kara Newman, author of Spice & Ice.

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Photo: Kenji Aoki

Peas O’Cake: Wonton Crunch

It doesn’t get much easier, or more delicious, than this: Mash peas with parsley, spices and ricotta, then fold into ready-made wonton wrappers. Bake. Devour.

Makes 24 appetizers

1 cup cooked peas

¼ cup ricotta cheese

1 jalapeño pepper, minced

1 tablespoon minced parsley

1 tablespoon chopped scallion

½ teaspoon minced ginger

Salt

24 wonton wrappers

1 egg white, lightly beaten

Cooking spray

1. Preheat the oven to 400°. Spray a baking sheet with cooking spray.

2. Lightly mash the peas. Add the ricotta, jalapeño, parsley, scallion and ginger, and mix well. Add salt to taste, about ¼ teaspoon.

3. Lay out the wonton wrappers on a work surface. Place 1 rounded teaspoon of the pea filling in the center of each. Lightly brush the edges of the wrappers with egg white. Fold over to form a triangle (or if using round wrappers, a half-moon). Press the edges with the tines of a fork, gently, to secure the seam so the filling does not fall out. Place the wontons in a single layer on the baking sheet. Spray them lightly with cooking spray. Bake for 3 to 4 minutes. Flip the wontons, and bake on the other side for another 3 to 4 minutes until they are crisp and golden brown.

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Photo: Kenji Aoki

Pom de Nuit: Ginger Bubbly

The earthy rhizome inspires and transforms this festive potion. A splash of pomegranate juice supplies the blush. Make it with candied ginger and ginger liqueur and top with Champagne. Drink, drink and be merry.

Makes 1 drink

1 ounce Domaine de Canton ginger liqueur

Sugar for rimming, preferably sanding sugar*

1 slice candied ginger, for garnish

1 ounce pomegranate juice

4 ounces brut Champagne or sparkling wine, chilled

Rim a Champagne flute by dipping the edge in the ginger liqueur and then in the sugar. Place a sliced coin of candied ginger at the bottom of the flute. Add the ginger liqueur and pomegranate juice to a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake until well chilled. Strain into the prepared flute. Top off with the Champagne or sparkling wine.

*This large-grain sugar can be found at baking-supply stores.

This is from Maria Hunt, author of The Bubbly Bar.

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Photo: Kenji Aoki

Sea Treat: Ginger and Honey Shrimp

This grilled app is easy to make, but the flavors are complex, thanks to a rich marinade of fresh ginger, chile flakes, honey, garlic and lemon.

Makes about 24 appetizers

1 tablespoon honey

1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
½ to 1 teaspoon red chile flakes

½ tablespoon lemon juice

½ teaspoon minced garlic

1 pound large shrimp, peeled, with tails on

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

Salt and pepper

1. In a large bowl, combine the honey, ginger, chile flakes, lemon juice and garlic. Mix well. Add the shrimp; toss to coat. Cover, and refrigerate for an hour.

2. Set a grill pan over high heat. Add the oil and shrimp. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, then flip over. It should take just another minute for the shrimp to turn pink and be fully cooked (but not overcooked). Add salt and pepper to taste.

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Photo: Kenji Aoki

Pink Shot: Roasted-Beet Soup

The hit in this soup-served-in-a-shot-glass comes from the unexpected beet, coriander and coconut milk combo. You can prepare the mix ahead of time and garnish it at the last minute with chopped chives and toasted coconut flakes.

Makes 16 shot-glass appetizers

½ teaspoon white pepper, plus more for seasoning

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 teaspoon salt, plus more for seasoning

1 tablespoon ground coriander

2 medium red beets, trimmed, scrubbed, peeled and halved (about 1 pound)

1½ to 2 cups chicken broth

½ cup coconut milk

Finely chopped chives or toasted unsweetened coconut flakes for garnish

1. Preheat the oven to 425°. Combine ½ teaspoon white pepper, the oil, 1 teaspoon salt and the coriander in a large bowl. Add the beets, and mix well to coat. Place the beets and marinade on a large piece of aluminum foil. Wrap tightly to keep steam from escaping.

2. Place the foil packet on a rimmed baking sheet, and bake for about 50 minutes or until the beets are soft and cooked through. Allow to cool to room temperature. Unwrap, and scrape the beets and marinade into a blender. Add the broth. Puree until smooth. Taste, and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Soup can be made ahead up to this point and reheated.

3. Pour into 16 small heatproof glasses. Swirl ½ tablespoon of the coconut milk into each glass. Garnish with chives, coconut flakes or both.


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Are You ALONE for The Holidays? What’s Your Story…… via [heartbreakrecoverykitchen]

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No, we’re not the first to solicit very, very, very short stories. Legend has it that Ernest Hemingway wrote a 6-word short story when challenged, in a bar, of course. His story: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.”

We’re going to be a little more generous with our word count, increasing it to 10 words (or less if you’re feeling concise). And we’re focusing solely on heartbreak, whether it’s due to a lost love, a lost job, a lost pet, or a less-harrowing misfortune or pratfall (like the time my freshly baked chocolate cake skittered off its pedestal and across the kitchen floor. I would have invoked the five-second rule if it hadn’t broken into many very untidy pieces).

We also want to provide solutions for others who might find themselves wallowing in a deep blue funk. So offer up a remedy or a recipe that helped you heal your broken heart or made you feel a smidge better.

Here’s one of mine:

Our eyes met. Our hearts fused. Then he looked away.

My remedy?

I cried, then headed for the kitchen to create these cookies.

They’re Lime-Sugar Cookies Dipped in Dark Chocolate. The ties are made from Fruit Roll-Ups, carefully cut into shape with a paring knife. I used a scalloped cookie cutter to take the “bite” out of each head. Eyes are M&Ms. On some of the boys, I used a straw to create an “O” shape for the mouth. It adds a surprised expression to his face. On others, I simply used red frosting to pipe a sad expression. Then I dipped the lower half of each boy into melted dark chocolate with a smidge of shortening added for sheen.

What’s your story … in 10 words or less? Be sure to provide a remedy or recipe that helped take the edge off.

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Responses to “What’s Your Story?”

She swallowed the worst news of her life—using champagne.

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This is not my original recipe, but for the life of me, I can’t remember where I found it. I keep it in the freezer, and just “dig out” a serving of the slush when I need a true lift. It’s great in very hot weather. Good for Derby parties, too, because it’s not too heavy and not too sweet.

Bourbon Slush

1 12 oz can frozen orange juice – thawed

1 12 oz can frozen lemonade – thawed

1 1/2 cups sugar

1 1/2 cups bourbon (we like Jim Beam)

2 cups boiling water with 4 tea bags steeped in it for 5 minutes (remove tea bags)

7 cups boiling water

Mix all ingredients in a plastic gallon bowl type container.

Place in freezer for 48 hours to ensure that it is completely frozen.

Scoop out with ice cream scoop or large spoon into glasses.

Michelle

She finally nabbed his heart with a chocolate cake.

My 92-year old grandmother wrote a beautiful journal about how SHE courted my grandfather. In those days the women didn’t pursue the men but my grandmother knew a good deal when she saw it. She finally nabbed his heart with a chocolate cake. In her journal she wrote, “So to all my darling granddaughters, if you want to win the heart of the man you love, bake him a chocolate cake.” I tried it on my boyfriend who is now my husband of 20 + years. Never underestimate the power of cake.

—Staci

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A tale of heartbreak and woe ends happily with potato.

Peruvian potato torte, that is. Recipe: http://cursivemechanics.ca/2010/07/15/salvation-in-a-potato/

Salvation in a Potato

by Jodi ~

Causa limeña: savoury Peruvian potato torte

In my autobiography, April 2006 through July 2006 will be known as “The Dark Period.”

I don’t remember what I ate during The Dark Period. More than that, I don’t remember eating at all. It did wonders for my figure. Oh, that glorious warm summer morning when I slid into a black pencil skirt that had been hanging patiently in my closet for several seasons. The well-tailored darts sheathed my hips with nary a ripple, and the pink blouse with the primly buttoned short sleeves I wore with it finally fit without pinching my triceps.

It was a hollow victory, though, in what was such a bleak time, a stretch of months through which I drifted with a heart that had practically stopped beating and feet that shuffled along reluctantly, without direction. I wore sunglasses whenever I was in public, as tears dripped from my eyes unpredictably, and often. When people spoke to me I was forced to ask them to repeat themselves twice, sometimes three times, as my brain was too full of grief to let anything else penetrate.

The weighty sadness I carried with me everywhere both numbed me and made me cringe with sensitivity. One moment I would be staring out the window of the GO train that carried me to and from work, watching the scenery whip by in a blur as I struggled to feel the arm that was clearly connected to my body, to raise my hand from where it lay, helpless, palm-side-up, on the seat beside me. The next I would sense acutely every hair on my head, the point where each strand burst from my scalp feeling like it had been poked open with the prick of a white-hot pin.

Through it all food barely registered in my conscious mind as a daily requirement. The Dark Period is perhaps the only period in recent memory when some part of my brain has not been turning over the possibilities — of ingredients, menus, spots to meet friends for dinner or drinks, locations from which to food-gather. The smell of coffee turned my stomach. I’d feel hungry only to drop whatever was in my hand as the nausea rose after the first bite. As time wore on it occurred to me that I had not turned on the stove in weeks, and then those weeks turned into months. I panicked. Eyes wide with fear, I asked the unthinkable question to a friend who had met me one Sunday afternoon to see how I was doing.

“What if I never want to cook again?”

My dear and wise friend, who knows me only too well — her birthday is the day after mine; we often joke that we share a brain — gave my arm a gentle pat and me a tender smile.

“Give it time, Jo. It will come,” she said. Of course she was talking about more than just my desire to cook.

Naturally, she was right, and as summer let its hair down the tension of The Dark Period began to ease. I started to feel at home again instead of an awkward intruder in my own living space. Conversation sputtered back to life and began to echo familiar rhythms. There was occasional laughter. And suddenly, one afternoon, like a bolt out of the blue it arrived: the inclination to cook.

Never mind that it was far too hot to do anything elaborate in the kitchen — the weather certainly wasn’t going to stop me after such an extended dry spell. Instead, I did one of the things I do best. I pulled a bunch of cookbooks from my shelf, leafed through their pages, and let my imagination wander. A grain salad, I thought, might be just the thing for getting reacquainted with my kitchen. But a grain salad seemed so practical and wholesome when I wanted something a little indulgent. A frozen dessert? No. Too frosty and aloof when I wanted something comforting. So when I stumbled upon a recipe for a traditional Peruvian savoury torte, served chilled, I knew it was perfect. Smooth mashed potatoes, rich layers of egg and olives, a tiny nip of heat from green chiles. I committed myself into causa limeña’s hands.

My kitchen welcomed me as if I had never been gone. My knives fit comfortably in my grip. When I reached into cupboards by rote for pots and bowls, it felt as if they fairly leapt into my reaching hands. The sound of peppercorns being crushed in the grinder was music to my ears. My taste buds jumped to attention when called upon to test levels of flavour. At the end of it all, it was time to sit down to eat. The torte?

It was cold. It was tangy. It was filling. It was tasty. It was good for me.

I had found salvation in a potato.

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Red wine simmering atop gas stove, unattended. Overflow! Giant flames.

I nearly set my apartment on fire making this Coq Au Vin recipe, wasting an entire bottle of wine in the process. My remedy: a tight-fitting lid to snuff out the flames, and a glass of wine poured from a back-up bottle to calm my nerves.

Recipe: http://www.americastestkitchen.com/recipes/detail.php?docid=7827

Modern Coq au Vin

Why this recipe works: Although conventional recipes for coq au vin take upwards of three hours to prepare, we felt that this rustic dish shouldn’t be so time-consuming. After all, it’s basically a chicken fricassee. We wanted to create a dish with tender, juicy chicken infused with the flavors of red wine, onions, mushrooms, and bacon in under two hours.

We decided to use chicken parts; this way, we could pick the parts we liked best. If using a mix of dark and white meat, we found it’s essential to start the dark before the white, so that all the meat finishes cooking at the same time and nothing is overcooked or undercooked. To thicken the stewing liquid, we sprinkled flour over the sautéed vegetables and whisked in butter toward the end of cooking; the butter also provided a nice richness in the sauce. Chicken broth added a savory note to the sauce and gave it some body; an entire bottle of red wine provided a great base of flavor. Tomato paste was a fuss-free way to add extra depth and body to the sauce, while a sprinkling of crisp, salty bacon rounded out the acidity of the wine.

Serves 4 to 6

Ingredients

  • 1 bottle fruity, smooth, medium-bodied red wine
  • 10 sprigs fresh parsley leaves
  • 2 tbs minced fresh parsley leaves
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 oz bacon, diced
  • 2 1/2 lbs boneless, skinless chicken thighs , trimmed of excess fat and cut in half
  • 5 tbs unsalted butter
  • 24 frozen pearl onions , thawed, drained, and patted dry (about 1 cup)
  • 8 oz pkg cremini mushrooms , wiped clean, stems trimmed, quartered
  • 2 medium cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tbs tomato paste
  • 2 tbs all-purpose flour
  • Salt and pepper

A medium-bodied, fruity red wine such as Pinot Noir or Rhône Valley Grenache is best for this recipe. Avoid bold, heavily oaked red wine varietals like Cabernet and light-bodied wines like Beaujolais. To use fresh pearl onions, trim the root and stem end of each onion and discard. Boil for 1 minute, shock in ice water, then peel a thin strip from root to stem. Remove any remaining outer skin (it’s like peeling off a jacket). If neither frozen nor fresh pearl onions are available, substitute one large onion cut into 1/2-inch pieces. (Do not use jarred pearl onions, which will turn mushy and disintegrate into the sauce.) Serve the stew with egg noodles or mashed potatoes.

Jeanne

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Returned to memory-packed restaurant in Arles. Now a Häagen Daz.

“Le Criquet” in Arles was the sweetest restaurant in the world–the old man served, and his wife cooked…they were surrogate grandma and grandpa to the tableful of young backpackers who crowded in for the 55-franc ($8) menus.

I offer my version of Blanquette de Porc in their honor:
http://chezbonnefemme.com/blanquettedeporc.aspx

Blanquette de Porc
Photograph by Richard Swearinger
Blanquette de veau, a veal stew with a luscious wine-laced sauce, is classic Bonne Femme fare. While I enjoy it made with veal in France, at home, I substitute pork blade steak–a cut from the shoulder. Not only is it so much easier to find, but it’s a rich, bold, comforting cut of meat that feels right at home in this classic stew. It’s also a more foolproof cut of meat; while veal can be tricky and dry out if cooked too quickly, pork shoulder is much more forgiving. 

For me, this is perfect Sunday night food–great for one of those autumn or winter weekends you just don’t want to end. Invite a couple friends over, open some wine (I like a good white Burgundy with this) and eke out as much pleasure from the evening as you can. As always with rich, meaty dishes, a garlicky green salad will go well with this. For dessert, a few hunks of cheese alongside bread and some high-quality honey or preserves will do just fine.

 

Makes 6 servings 

3 – 3 1/2 pounds pork blade steak (also called pork steak)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 medium onion, peeled and quartered

2 cloves

1 large carrot, cut in half crosswise, then each half cut into quarters

1 celery rib including leaves, cut into 3-inch pieces

2 cups dry white wine

2 cups low-sodium chicken broth

1 bouquet garni*

n

4 carrots, cut into 1/4 x 2 inch sticks

1/2 16-ounce bag pearl onions

6 ounces fresh tiny button mushrooms (or use larger mushrooms, halved or quartered), stems

trimmed

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

n

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

3 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1/4 cup heavy cream

3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Hot parsleyed noodles, for serving

 

1. Pat pork dry with paper towels. Cut pork off the bone into 1 to 2 inch pieces, trimming most of the fat away as you go. Season pork to taste with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a Dutch oven or a braiser over medium to medium-high heat. Cook the pork, half at a time, in hot oil for 5 to 7 minutes per batch, turning as needed to brown evenly. Drain any fat and return all meat to the pot. Stud two of the onion quarters with the cloves; add the onion quarters, carrot, celery, wine, broth, and bouquet garni to the pot. Bring to boiling; reduce heat, and simmer, covered, about 45 minutes or until pork is tender.

2. About 15 minutes toward the end of the cooking time for the pork, prepare the vegetables: In a large saucepan, bring the four cut carrots, the frozen pearl onions, and 1/4 cup lightly salted water to boiling; cover and simmer over medium heat for 4 minutes or until just tender. Drain and remove vegetables to a colander. In the same saucepan, heat 1 tablespoon of the butter over medium heat. Cook and stir the button mushrooms in the butter for 2 to 3 minutes or until tender and light brown. Return onions and carrots to the pot; set aside and cover to keep warm.

3. Drain the pork, reserving the cooking stock. Wipe out any residue in Dutch oven. Place pork in a bowl and cover with foil to keep warm; discard other solids, including the cloves and bouquet garni. Skim fat from the cooking stock; pour through a fine-mesh sieve back into the Dutch oven. Bring to boiling and boil until reduced to 2 cups.

4. Work the remaining 2 tablespoons butter and the flour together to form a paste. Drop into cooking stock, half a time, cooking and stirring with a wire whisk after each addition until well integrated. Cook and stir until thickened and bubbly; cook and stir 1 minute more; add the cream, stirring with a wire whisk to combine.

5. Return meat to Dutch oven; add vegetables and lemon juice. Cook and stir very gently to heat through. Serve with hot parsleyed noodles or baked rice.

* Note: For a bouquet garni, using kitchen string tie together 3 sprigs fresh thyme, 5 sprigs parsley, and one bay leaf (or tuck these into an bouquet garni cheesecloth spice bag). Or use a purchased bouquet garni.

chezbonnefemme

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My lovely listener lost, I talk to God and ghost.

One of the hardest things about losing a spouse is not having that person to share good news with or just the details of your day. So many times, I found myself thinking “I can’t wait to tell Jim this” before catching myself.
Now, if you see me out for a walk or driving in the car and I seem to be talking to myself, I’m probably talking to Jim, or to God. Or I might just be talking to myself!

Anne

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The Aussie said my apple pie almost made him stay.

The remedy didn’t come upon me right away. Most don’t. But after weeks and weeks of heartrending aching, I thought, I’m going to make that apple pie even better. And it continues to evolve. But not for him. For me.

Renee

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Eating pupus while laughing not advised! Flying fish everywhere.

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Amy

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Top o’ the Mornin’ Introducing SEXY Irish Coffee French Toast

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Irish Coffee French Toast

UD - Irish Coffee French Toast

Yields:2 servings (4 slices) Cost: About $1.35 per serving
Ingredients:
French Toast
1 Forttuna Choco Chunk loaf/cake
2 Farm Fresh eggs
1/2 cup Sheridans Irish Coffee Cream liqueur
1/2 teaspoon Vanilla extract
1 plus tablespoon butter, for cooking
Powdered sugar, for garnish

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Irish Coffee Cream Topping:
1/2 can  Non-Dairy Dessert Topping
1 Tablespoon Via Roma instant espresso
6 Tablespoons of Sheridans Irish Cream Coffee liqueur

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Instructions:
1.Unwrap the mini cake and turn it on its side. Cut into 4 equal rounds.
2. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, Irish Coffee Liqueur,and vanilla.
3. Melt about 1 tablespoon of butter in a large frying pan.
4. Thoroughly soak each cake round in the egg mixture and place in the fry pan.
5. Cook 2-3 minutes on each side, until golden brown.
6. While the toast is cooking, empty about half the can of non dairy topping into a bowl and mix in the instant espresso.
7. Place 2 pieces of the toast on 2 plates and sprinkle with powdered sugar.
8. Serve the Irish coffee cream mixture on top.

SHERIDANS – Irish Coffee Cream Liqueur

SHERIDANS
Description:

Visually stunning, it is owned by Gilbey’s, the same group that produces Baileys.

With its white liqueur having a white chocolate richness, and the black of warm coffee and whiskey, the whole rounded off by a chocolate & nutty finish.

Producer: Sheridans
ABV:   15.5%
Brand:   Sheridans



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Gourmet Thanksgiving Leftover Recipes via [CherisFabulousFoods]

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Posted by Cheri Sicard
OK. The big meal is over. Everyone has gone home. The kitchen is cleaned and the house is back in order…except for the refrigerator. How are you going to use those leftovers? It would be a shame to waste all that food. Instead, check out the recipe links below to help put it all to tasty use.
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Thanksgiving Turkey Leftover Recipes

Get Rid of Extra Mashed Potatoes

Use Up Cranberries and Cranberry Sauce



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SEXY Pizza Recipes for 2 : Caviar & Lobster Pizza / Fig & Gorgonzola Pizza via [funkiefood]

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Romantic Recipes for Two …

Over the years I have collated a whole bunch of romantic dinner recipes. Some of these are my own and some are my favourites from chefs who truly understand sexy food. So if you are planning a romantic dinner for two, then take a browse through my recipes below and find that romantic recipe for two that suits your taste and mood.

Our readers would be most greatful if you shared your romantic dinner for two experience also. Just click here and drop me a line. Also, if you would like to contribute your own Romantic Recipes for Two, please don’t be bashful.

For pure indulgence, here’s a pizza recipe from John Lanzafame.
John is the current World Pizza Champion.You should definitely buy this book. 

Lobster and caviar pizza
Makes one 30cm (12 inch) pizza

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Coarse semolina for dusting
1 qty pizza dough (see John’s video below)
1 1/2 fl oz (45ml) shellfish glaze (page 20 of Johns book)
1 1/2 oz (40g) mascarpone cheese
1 small raw lobster tail, peeled and thinly sliced
1 tablespoon of baby capers
2 tablespoons pitted green olives
3 tablespoons thinly sliced eel (I prefer to leave this out)
1 oz (25g) grated mozzerella cheese
Grapeseed oil, for deep frying
2 1/4 oz (60g) cleaned baby calamari cut into rings
1/3 cup conrflour
1 large handful of watercress sprigs
2 tablespoons lemon dressing (page 28 Johns book)
2 tablespoons good quality caviar

 Ounces to grams (oz to gr) and grams to ounces  (gr to oz) Online  Calculator - Converter / Conversion Chart / Table

Place a pizza stone in the oven and pre-heat to 500F (250C)

Lightly dust your workbench with semolina, then roll out the dough into a 12 inch round (30cm) place on a pizza tray and prick all over with a fork (dock it). Spread the shellfish glaze over the base, then top with dollops of mascarpone, lobster, capers, olives, smoked eel and grated mozzarella in that order. Place on the pre-heated stone and bake for 5-8 minutes, or until the base is golden or crisp.

Meanwhile heat the oil to 350F (180C) or until a cube of bread dropped in the oil browns in 15 seconds. Dust the calamari in cornflour, shaking off the excess, then deep fry for 30 seconds, or until golden and crisp. Drain on paper towel and season to taste.

Remove pizza from the oven. Toss the watercress sprigs with the lemon dressing and scatter over the pizza, then top with the fried calamari, sprinkle with the caviar and serve.

http://www.jammed.com/~mlb/blogpics/2006/03/pasta/intercourses.jpg

 

 

Another great Sexy pizza recipe from John Lanzafame. This one using one of the most popular aphrodisiac foods… figs 

Fig & Gorgonzola Pizza
Makes one 30cm (12 inch) pizza

https://opuluxeltd.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/fig-caramalized-onion-proscuitto-and-goat-cheese-pizza.jpg?w=300

Coarse semolina for dusting
1 qty pizza dough (see John’s video above)

1 1/2 fl oz (45ml) Bechemel sauce
1 1/2 oz (40g) gorgonzola cheese
1 oz (25g) grated mozzerella cheese
1 small raw lobster tail, peeled and thinly sliced
2 tablespoons of chopped flat leaf parsley
3 medium sized figs
6 thin slices of proscuitto
Balsamic vinegar to drizzle
Pecorina Cheese to finish

 Ounces to grams (oz to gr) and grams to ounces  (gr to oz) Online  Calculator - Converter / Conversion Chart / Table

Place a pizza stone in the oven and pre-heat to 500F (250C)

Lightly dust your workbench with semolina, then roll out the dough into a 12 inch round (30cm) place on a pizza tray and prick all over with a fork (dock it). Spread the bechemel sauce over the base, then top with dollops of gorgonzolla cheese, parsley, and the grated mozzarella in that order. Place on the pre-heated stone and bake for 5-8 minutes, or until the base is golden or crisp.

Remove pizza from the oven. cut the pizza into 6 pieces. Place quartered figs quickly onto the pizza followed by the proscuitto slices. Using a microplane, grate fresh pecorino cheese over the pizza and then drizzle with a little balsamic vinegar. and serve.

 



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Pineapple Cobbler via [allyou]

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Pineapple Cobbler



Yield: 8 Servings
Cost per Serving: $.46

Ingredients

Preparation

Preheat oven to 375°F. In a bowl, mix flour, salt, sugar, baking powder, milk and vanilla extract; stir until mixture forms a smooth batter. Gently stir in butter.

Spread batter evenly in a 9-by-13-inch baking dish (it will be a very thin layer) and scatter pineapple chunks evenly over batter.

Bake until pineapple has fallen to bottom of pan and top is puffed and golden brown and springs back slightly when touched in middle, 25 minutes. Cool cobbler slightly and then serve warm with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream, if desired.


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Lemon Ricotta Pancakes via [cupcakesandcashmere]

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by Emily

When I was little I loved the ritual of Saturday morning pancakes.  The buttery smell wafted through the entire house and was a guarantee that the rest of the morning would be spent indulgently lazy and satisfied.  I still feel the same way about pancakes and now appreciate slightly more refined recipes like these lemon ricotta pancakes with lemon curd and raspberries (recipe here).  Instead of waiting until the weekend to try them, I decided to make them for dinner and they were full of flavor and a fun change from our normal routine.





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