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Archive for Art & Design

Cheap & Chic DIY ecoLuxe Headboards via [lovely undergrad, copycat chic, curbly,and allthingsgd]

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One of the easiest ways to spruce up a boring bedroom is by dressing up the bed. But pillows, bedsheets, and a pretty comforter only go so far. Here are some diy headboard ideas so that you can give your bed a little extra ooomph!

Above: For this “Tall Order” headboard featured at BHG (Better Homes & Gardens), an inexpensive artist’s canvas was covered in fabric and propped behind the bed. I particularly like this project because the canvas could be re-covered if you want to change you color scheme or it could moved around the room if you no longer wish to use it as a headboard. I do think, however, that it should be fastened to the wall in some way to avoid falling on your head during sleep. Some kind of adhesive hooks might just do the trick?
Above: If you’re feeling especially ambitious or crafty, a diy-upholstered headboard may be just the project for you. Click here for BHG instructions on creating this luxe headboard using medium-density fiberboard, batting, and your choice of fabric. (Apparently it takes only three hours and no special tools are required!)
Above: This “Letter Perfect” headboard shown on BHG is dedicated to all you bookworms and future novelists out there. Collect new or vintage letters of varying sizes and colors flea markets, antique shops, and craft-stores… and put ’em up on the wall with some double-sided tape, poster putty, or adhesive hooks (depending on the material and weight of your letter).
Above: Hey, globetrotters… you may like BHG’s “Map Quest” headboard project. Simply use decoupage medium to adhere paper road maps to an old headboard. (Note: Do not, under any circumstances, decoupage the dorm-provided headboard… it will damage the school’s furniture.) For a dorm-safe approach I would recommend either doing this to a headboard you own and bringing it to school… or decoupaging a flat piece of plywood and temporarily attaching it to the headboard the school provided you with.
Above: Add some timeless romance to your dorm by borrowing the “Screen Star” idea from BHG. Simply place a folding screen between your headboard and the wall. Wrought iron is always gorgeous, but there are a variety of screen available out there. Plus, a vertical screen will draw the eye upward.
Above: BHG’s “Perfectly Padded” idea is a new take on the old upholstered headboard. I absolutely adore this idea. Simply hang a bench cushion by it’s ties from wall-mounted hooks. I think those adhesive hooks are pretty much ideal for this project. (Just make sure that they are all attached to the wall at the same level so that your cushion isn’t crooked.) You could also put a twist on this diy by hanging the cushion over the long part of your bed instead of at the headboard. It could give your bed a daybed like.
Above: Isn’t this BHG project pretty? This “Elegant Illusion” also happens to be a piece of cake. While you’re not allowed to paint the walls at school, vinyl decals are a great alternative. I’m sure if you shop around you’ll be able to find a vinyl headboard decal. Or you could stick other decals to the wall and create your own idea of a headboard. I think one of those chandelier silhouette decals would be quite eye-catching over a bed.
Above: So this BHG idea, called “Pop of Color“, is the easiest, most convenient, and easiest headboard project. So if you’re not crafty, on a small budget, or simply change your mind a lot… give this diy a chance. Simply drape a panel of fabric over the headboard. Then tuck the ends under the mattress to keep it in place. Yup… it’s that easy. With several pieces of pretty, patterned fabric on hand, you could change your headboard’s look on a whim.

Above: This “Paper Headboard” from I heart Norwegian Wood on Flickr is super easy and super stylish. The headboard design was simply drawn onto and cut out of thick, white poster board and stuck to the wall.

Above: This “Scrapbook Paper” headboard (also from I heart Norwegian Wood) is what I’m leaning towards doing in my own dorm room. I was first inspired by a $13 Paper Wall, but it took some surfing around to find a photo of what I wanted to do… which is to attach scrapbook paper in different colors and patterns to the wall above my bed. I think I may go all the way up to the ceiling though in my room. This can be done by simply attaching scrapbook paper squares to the wall with double-sided tape, adhesive strips, or poster putty. 

Above: I love the headboard in this bedroom belonging to Flickr user kimhas6cats. It’s a different take on using a screen as a headboard. It’s her screen that’s really the key. It seems that it was just made for hanging things… like scarves, artwork, etc. It’s really quite a fabulous idea. And considering I personally own over twenty scarves… I’m keeping my eyes open for a screen like this. Imagine all the other things you could hang from it! So many possibilities.

Final Word:

If you’re creative, crafty, and innovative… there is a variety of ways to customize your bed and your dorm in general. But I do stress over and over again that it’s soooo important to read your residence hall contract and handbook so that you know what you are allowed to do decor-wise in the dorm and what is prohibited. Every college has different rules. If you don’t understand something in the contract or handbook, e-mail your residence hall director or dormitory staff. Be informed, be safe, and be creative. 🙂

I’m going to call attention to a couple of my favorite blogger DIY projects. These ladies both made their own gorgeous headboards inspired by designer beds for a substantial savings! What’s not to love? I’m seriously considering making myself a new headboard, even though the one I have is less than a year old….lol.

First up, we have Freckles Chic with her awesome linen headboard with nailhead trim. Cost of making this headboard? Only $73!

Looks pretty similar to West Elm’s Nailhead Upholstered Headboard…King size = $449.

Next, Holly over at Life in the Fun Lane made a glamorous white headboard (directions here)in keeping with her unique clean cottage chic style. Just love it!

This is an easy and cheap way to get a headboard that looks like Williams Sonoma Home’s Fairfax Bed with out the pocket emptying cost!

Yeah yeah, we’ve all seen enough headboards, right? Well, imagine this long upholstered headboard with a queen sized bed in front of it and two sparse, but interesting side tables on either side of it. It would function as a headboad, of course, but also as wall art across a wide expanse of wall. That’s been on my drawing board for a long time, and now someone has gone and done it. As usual  Cococozy has compiled a nice little assortment of fantastic photos of  yet more headboard alternatives for your consideration.

created at: 06/03/2010



created at: 06/03/2010

Above: Decal Wall Stickers Headboard (those with patience could paint this)

Block of Blue Headboard

created at: 06/03/2010

Photo by Eric Roth

Wingback Headboard

created at: 06/03/2010

Photo: Richard Powers

Floral Screen Headboard

created at: 06/03/2010

Photo: Polly Wreford

I received a reader request from my fabulous friend Beth who’d like to see some DIY headboard options for her darling daughter Maya. Well ladies, here’s what I was able track down–hope you see something you like!

The first thing that came to mind is a DIY headboard made from a piece of picket fence. My mother-in-law did this in her guest room and I just love it. Nice and simple, and oh so cute. Unfortunately I don’t have any photos from my mother-in-law’s house, but here is one from Better Homes & Gardens. I also found a slight variation at HGTV.com.


Another great idea is this simple DIY canopy, which would be so cute for a little girl’s room–and you could change out the fabric as she grows and her tastes mature!


The fun fabric and shape of this charming DIY upholstered headboard keeps it looking young and playful.


Another simple great idea–again from Better Homes & Gardens. This headboard is made from plain old bi-fold closet doors painted with stripes.


I love this chic suggestion from Domino–painting a faux headboard right on your wall using a color just a couple shades lighter than your wall color. Don’t want to buy a whole other can of paint? Just mix some white paint with your existing wall color paint and you’re good to go.


Although not necessarily what comes to mind for my friend’s daughter Maya, here are two more ideas from BHG that I just love–Pic 1 is made from a painted paneled door, and Pic 2 is made with weathered shutters.

As you may have noticed by now–Better Homes & Gardens is an excellent site for finding some beautiful DIY headboard ideas! To see these DIY headboard ideas and more, check out their slide show of 29 Cheap & Chic Headboard Projects.

And if anyone has any other great ideas for Beth’s daughter, we’d love to hear them!


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3d art, fashion

Banknote Jewellery

06.16.10 | 2 Comments

A graduate of London’s Royal College of Art Tine De Ruysser, Ph.D spends her days investigating production methods and folding patterns with a metal and fabric, a new material she invented while she was a student.

Banknote Jewellery” is a conceptual and even political piece articulating the relationship between paper money and gold. A timely piece during our world’s financial crisis, Tine explores the symbolism and relationship between the value of paper money and gold.

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2d graphics, 3d art

Flower of Life

06.15.10 | No Comments

A symbol of sacred geometry, the Flower of Life is composed of multiple evenly-spaced, overlapping circles, that are arranged so that they form a flower-like pattern with a sixfold symmetry like a hexagon. The center of each circle is on the circumference of six surrounding circles of the same diameter. Because numbers carried symbolic significance in the Old World, geometric shapes became a visual representation of these symbolic numbers and was involved in the planning and construction of many religious structures, including churches and temples. (Read an article written last year regarding Islamic Architecture.) Natural examples of the Flower of Life include: honeycombs, sunflowers and rocks. And lastly, a contemporary example of the Flower of Life can be seen in origami tessellations. Below is a piece by Andrea Russo, titled “Stars in a Sky of Hexagons” – a perfect example of what the Flower of Life is.

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3d art, fashion

Geomorphology by Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana

06.09.10 | No Comments

Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana’s Professor Claudia Fernandez and Mauricio Velasquez Posada explores the use volume, space, and environment to recreate the meaning of origami and the human body. Learn more over here and here. It really makes me pause and say, “hey! whoever created this amazing piece has a truly unique mind!”

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2d graphics, 3d art, technology

Origami Maze Puzzle Font

06.08.10 | No Comments

Erik D. Demaine, Martin L. Demaine, and Jason Ku over at MIT created an origami maze puzzle font, which is a template that shows you how to fold 3D letters of the entire alphabet.

(c) Crease Pattern of the Alphabet: Dark lines are mountain folds; light lines are valley folds; bold lines delineate letter boundaries and are not folds.

(c: Crease Pattern) folds into (b: 3D extrusion), which is an extrusion of (a: 2D maze)

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3d art, lifestyle & media

Paper Planes

06.07.10 | No Comments

Paper planes are so simple, yet it inspire admirers for different reasons. The act of folding paper planes and testing its aerodynamics is so satisfying and fun! Jamming to the paper planes song by MIA is pretty hip too.  May I suggest, the stylish flying paper plane wall decals by Mel Lim from Blik? And lets not forget Dawn Ng’s art installation “I fly like paper get high like planes.”

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3d art, fashion, origami paper

Modular Origami

06.04.10 | No Comments

Modular Origami created with paper (by H.W. guth) and one in a form of a necklace (by Claire & Arnaud)

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home & garden

Brooke Woosley’s Oru

06.01.10 | No Comments

Los Angeles based Environmental Designer Brooke Woosley is another amazing designer who challenged herself by creating a dynamic piece of furniture with a flat sheet of metal. In this process, she experimented with paper, basswood, light, and chipboard and finally concocted this awesome piece called Oru. It is waterjet cut, bent aluminum, painted in an auto finish: gloss white top with a matte blue underside. An excellent piece of furniture for a modern loft or studio.

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lifestyle & media, news & events

Memorial Day @ New York Times

05.31.10 | No Comments

It’s Monday, May 31st, Memorial Day and in today’s New York Times article “The Great Unknowns” by Robert M. Poole, he addresses the unknown fatalities of war and how lovely there are origami flowers to compliment this opinion piece.

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2d graphics

Bored? Make Love

05.28.10 | No Comments

After all the love making, sleeping and staring off into space, might this poster inspire some more love making activity? Lovely origami hearts that is.

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2d graphics

origami typefaces 2

05.27.10 | No Comments

graphics

Origami Typefaces

07.28.08 | 1 Comment

Fun origami typefaces from designers in USA, Germany, and Japan. My favorite ones are the the ones from Japan – it reminds me of my modern alphabet jewelry collection.

Click to continue reading “Origami Typefaces”

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lifestyle & media

Surface Magazine Origami Covers

07.25.08 | 1 Comment

Known for featuring top and innovative designers, New York-based design magazine Surface was inspired to use origami to grace their magazine covers!

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fashion

With a Shoe, Marloes ten Bhömer Influences What Beauty Can Be

07.24.08 | 4 Comments

London-based Dutch product designer Marloes ten Bhömer who studied at the London College of Fashion and the Royal College of Art produces the most eye-catching and swoon worthy shoes. What makes Ms. Bhömer’s shoes so different is that she researches and works with materials, forms and construction methods that are rarely seen in shoe design. What’s more is that she works with our favorite friend origami in creating some of her couture shoes. You can also visit her at the Virtual Shoe Museum.

The first special edition MARLOESTENBHOMER® shoe will be available to order very soon. If you would like to be amongst the first to know about the launch, please email her!

[left: Foldedshoe / Materials: Wood and tarpaulin / A single sheet of fabric folded once to create an abstracted shoe shape]

[right: Carbonfibreshoe #2 / Materials: Carbon fibre and leather / Shoes constructed from carbon fibre, cladded in leather ]

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lifestyle & media, origami paper, technology

Fold Loud by JooYoun Paek

07.23.08 | 1 Comment

New York-based artist and interaction designer JooYoun Paek created a musical play interface called Fold Loud which combines technology, origami, and sound to create an interactive experience of relaxation, recovery and balance.

While you fold classic origami bases from this unique sheet of paper, it simultaneously creates soothing harmonic vocal sounds. Each fold is assigned a different sound so that a combination of these folds create harmony. Click here to watch the video.

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home & garden

All That Glitters is Hanna Nyman

07.21.08 | No Comments

All That Glitters is Hanna Nyman

Swedish product and print designer Hanna Nyman lets her talent shine through in creating this beautiful lighting system. Plus it is also very origami and we like that.

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fashion

Leather Aligator Fold Clutch by Chloe

07.16.08 | 2 Comments

Chloe Leather Aligator Fold Clutch

Thanks to the awesome fold factor in origami, Chloe offers a new, fun and fashionable way to hold your most intimate belongings!

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home & garden

Nenen by Igor Marq for Corian

07.14.08 | No Comments


Architect Igor Marq designed an origami-inspired piece called Nenen for Corian. This innovative centerpiece is exemplary of form follows function; useful as a supportive base as well as a centerpiece for fruits and veggies!

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fashion

Elijah sports tank

07.10.08 | No Comments

elijah origami top

If I had a fabulous party to attend this summer, I would wear this origami sports top to go running so that I can fit into the beautiful Dior Dresses. The sports tank is on sale too!

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home & garden

no. 973, origami chair by James Dieter

07.08.08 | No Comments

( I know it was 5 years ago, but still very cool to feature )

no.973, origami chair by James Dieter

In 2003, designboom and 100% design organized an international design competition: 100% folding chairs. There were more than 1300 participants, from 84 countries, 470 prototype-entries received, and only one winner. On our blog, our winner would have been entry no. 973, titled Origami Chair from Brooklyn-based design studio founded by James Dieter.

no.973, origami chair by James Dieter

Constructed with polycarbonate and polyester mesh, the chair folds together from a single sheet into a three dimensional structure, strong enough to withstand the weight of an adult.

Check out dform –  you’ll find more James Dieter manipulating of flat sheet materials such as wood veneer or plastic and transform them into dynamic three dimensional forms.

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home & garden

Origami by Reflex-Angelo

07.07.08 | No Comments

Reflex Anglo Origami Wall

Matteo of Arredo blog was kind enough to comment on the cool origami wall entry, which led to the awesome discovery of Reflex-Angelo. These origami-inspired cabinets also double as shelving units, you will see the various shelf combinations you can create to fit your lifestyle.

(ps. They’ll also offer you a wonderful web experience when you click to their site!)

Unfolding Story: Origami Furniture via [modernluxury]

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By Carla Jordan | CS magazine

Modern manufacturers are interpreting the centuries-old Japanese art of paper folding with laser-cut slotted sheets of steel that can be bent, folded and locked into place. Or with three-dimensional fabric tiles that can be installed on walls or ceilings to form an endless variety of shapes. We say they’re a sweet twist of fate!

https://i2.wp.com/www.lyring.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/Textile-Tile-Art-You-Can-Create-Kvadrat-1-470x319.jpg

>>Kvadrat’s Clouds fabric tiles, $445-$500/pack of eight, $1,120-$1,250/pack of 24, kvadratclouds.com

https://i2.wp.com/origamiblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/anglo-origami-wall.jpg
>>Reflex-Angelo Origami modular cabinet, price upon request, reflexangelo.com

https://i1.wp.com/s3files.core77.com/blog/images/MIOorigami.jpg
>>Jaime Salm’s Origami side table, $185, miocollection.com

https://i2.wp.com/www.pleatfarm.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/mia-cullin-POLYGON-cushion-1.jpg
>>Polygon cushion, $100, miacullin.com

https://i1.wp.com/www.unicahome.com/products/small/35459.5AEF53A9.jpg
>>A La Carte Origami three-piece bowl/plate set, $100, rosenthalusa.com

https://i1.wp.com/www.furniturestoreblog.com/image/2010/09/pleat%20table.jpg
>>Arktura’s Pleat table, $4,000, unicahome.com


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NEW Ultra Sleek Murphy Beds via [SpotCoolStuff]

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The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance Design—and fashion—are circular in nature. Trends come, and go, and then come again. So it is with the Murphy Bed, that bane of 1970s studio apartments. After a 30 year hiatus we are in the midst of a revival of beds that fold down from a wall. Except now a Murphy Bed is as likely to fold down from a ceiling or emerge from the back of a desk. And instead of the ugly wall monstrosity that reveals a lumpy mattress, today’s Murphy Beds are sleek, elegant and comfortable. The difference between modern Murphy Beds and those of yesteryear has lead at least one website to call for these hidden beds to be called something else. “Flying beds” it suggests. Whatever moniker you want to use for them, here are some designs that caught Spot Cool Stuff’s eye:

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

Twirl Bed

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance Like a secrete door in some eccentric mansion, this bed spins out from behind a book case. The Twirl Bed is only 22 inches (56 cm) deep. And nine of those inches are reserved for the shelves! There’s an optional table that folds down from the middle of the shelf system. Available in twin and queen mattress sizes.

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance Inhabit Pillows - Modern Design! bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance
bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

“The Tale” Computer Bed

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance Looking at this modern-minimalist computer desk and you’ll never know that it doubles as a bed. The twin mattress (no other sizes available) folds via gas pistons that dampen the weight as the bed is pulled down and assists with the lifting as you bring it up. We love how the bed can be folded up and down without clearing the items from the desk. Comes in six colors including walnut, cherry and maple.

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

Poppi

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance This bed emerges length-wise from underneath a shelf. When the bed is folded up the space it would occupies is home to a storage unit with two drawers and several shelves. Slide the whole storage unit via it’s railing rollers to snug fit under the desk and—viola—there’s no space for your bed.

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

Cool Murphy Beds: Poppi

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

Elevator Bed

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance How cool is this: A bed that emerges down from the ceiling! This bed is designed to allow some to sleep on it at any height—you can lower it all the way to the floor or use it half way down, bunk bed-like. The installation, of course, is a tricky and expensive business. More installations of the Elevator Bed require adding substantial ceiling and wall reinforcements to your house. The raising and lowering of the bed happens electronically. The mechanism for it can lift up to 900 pounds and is operated by remote control. If you are worried about accidentally smushing your overnight guests (or if you intend to) you’ll be happy (or sad) to know that the remote control includes a two-finger lock; also the bed will not move if it is holding more than 20 pounds (9kg) its empty weight.

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

Mr. Hide Sofa Bed

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance There are lots of sofas that fold open to make a bed. But how many sofas can fold out into a bunk bed with three mattresses? Only one that we know of: Mr Hide. It even includes a ladder. Available in four luscious colors: cream, sky blue, dark green and Bordeaux.

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance
bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

Dresser Cabinet Bed

Dresser Cabinet BedIf you’ve clicked through the “learn more” links for the above beds you’ll know that most are incredibly expensive (eg. $5,000+). Most also require time or great expense to install. If you needs, or budget, is more modest this handsome cabinet bed may do the trick. The drawer and door handles of this cabinet are for show only. They do, however, look realistic and hide any hint that there’s a bed inside.

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance

Pet Foldaway

bedroom The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance The Modern Murphy Bed Renaissance has not forgotten your pets. This affordable, attractive buffet cabinet encases a fold down bed for Fido. Available in a black and mahogany finish. 

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Vintage Fashion Mannequins are Repurposed into Glamorous Vegas Showgirl Lamps via [Las Vegas Sun]

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Ladies of the light

Artist brings new radiance to vintage mannequins

ImageLeila Navidi

By Kristen Peterson

Two yeas ago Joe Clark, an antiques collector and longtime prop artist for Siegfried & Roy, was dressing a vintage mannequin with a vintage lampshade and flower petals made of abalone.

He added a light bulb. In walked Cindy Funkhouser.

“I have to have that,” said Funkhouser, an antiques dealer. “I don’t care how much it is, I want that. And can you make 10 more?”

The lamps that Clark made for his first show in the back gallery at the Funk House were a smash. Outlandish and topped with vintage accoutrements, the works came to be known as “art lamps,” functional artistic compositions of vintage wares, each with its own theme. The first lamps sold for as much as $2,000. Clark, a Massachusetts native who moved to Las Vegas 18 years ago, was launched as an artist.

Now he’s returned with another series, “So Rare II,” on display at the Fallout Gallery on Commerce Street.

In the sitting room of his 1935 Las Vegas bungalow, a dimly lighted and shadowy environment decked out with the finest rugs and antiques, Clark says he’s blown away by the reaction to his “ladies,” which were inspired by childhood memories of being dragged through department stores.

Built on his Moroccan coffee table surrounded by a 1930s sofa and chairs, the women still wear their original makeup.

They are sultry, sexy, vixenesque and glamorous, but not perfect.

“The chip on her chin. I don’t fix stuff like that,” Clark says. “There is something romantic about the flaws, the dings, the cracks; that all adds to the realness.”

But don’t expect a second-rate work. Clark puts all his love and some household appliances into crafting the sculptures. Like a dress designer who understands the line of a woman’s body, Clark understands his vintage mannequins and adjusts to their forms with strategically placed adornments.

A wedding cake lady lamp features a mannequin with a cake plate topping her head, a veil attached. Twinkling lights, Capodimonte porcelain roses and glass beads wrap around her body.

Another lady wears a Proctor Silex lighted electric coffee brewer atop a plate on her head. Dangling from the turquoise plate are matching coffee cups.

A 1944 telephone serves as the base of another lamp. The receiver, which Clark says still works, stems from her head. A ’50s desk lamp, screwed into the head of the mannequin, lights it from above.

Another wears a brass art deco chandelier with twinkling flamelike red lights.

Sitting amid the lamps last week, Clark played a recording of the lamps’ theme song, “So Rare,” written by John Rufus Sharpe and Jerry Herst, and humorously explained that the ladies sometimes seem to have a relationship with one another. Laughing, his friend Douglas Sargeant, who assists with the lamps, added, “It’s very loud sometimes in here. It’s a real hen house.”

Some come with stories. Many of the hundreds of shells (conch shells, starfish, coral and more) affixed to a lamp that sold at Clark’s last show hold a little piece of paper with a note. The woman who owned the shells received them from men all over the world. For the headpiece, Clark took his bathroom light fixture, mounted it on the mannequin and placed the shell of a large sea urchin, which holds the light bulb, inside.

Clark says his years working with Siegfried & Roy at their show and at the Jungle Palace helped him hone his abilities. He regards the magicians, who gave him advice with props at the show, as mentors, but he credits his childhood and Americana for the inspiration.

“It’s fascinating to pull up some of these memories and create work from them.”




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Modern Terrariums Make A Comeback via [NYT] Date



Katy Maslow, left, and Ms. Inciarrano have created
many of their terrariums in glass containers they found at flea markets
and antique fairs. Within a year, the friends had amassed so many that
they decided to sell them under the name Twig Terrariums at the
Brooklyn Flea market in Fort Greene.

Credit: Robert Wright for The New York Times

Ms. Maslow’s apartment in Midwood, Brooklyn, is
filled with her terrariums, arranged alongside other finds from flea
markets and antique fairs.

Credit: Robert Wright for The New York Times

A magnifying glass helps Ms. Inciarrano work in a
tiny terrarium. She and Ms. Maslow often use figurines in their
creations, including this painter seated at an easel.

Credit: Robert Wright for The New York Times

Katie Goldman Macdonald, a designer for Old Navy,
makes terrariums in her studio apartment in the Mission District in San
Francisco. She sells them through local stores, and to friends and
coworkers.

Credit: Drew Kelly for The New York Times

She prefers to fill her terrariums with succulents,
which she plants in pieces that are hand-blown for her by the glass
artist Evan Kolker in Oakland, Calif.

Credit: Drew Kelly for The New York Times

One of Ms. Macdonald’s terrariums. She described
making one as a sort of science experiment, albeit one conducted with
color, texture and visual composition in mind.

Credit: Drew Kelly for The New York Times

Every day, customers come into Sprout Home, a
garden store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, asking about terrariums, said
Tassy Zimmerman, an owner. Sprout sells pre-made terrariums, as well as
all the materials necessary to assemble one.

Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

A hanging terrarium for sale at Sprout Home.

Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

A hallmark of Sprout’s terrariums are whimsical
touches like tiny birds.

Credit: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times

A little bit of greenery never hurt anyone – and from
what we’ve heard even the most die-hard brown-thumbed gardeners can do
pretty well with a small terrarium. It will add a touch of happy
hippie-chic to a modern room:
“They fit with the current infatuation with all
things old and scientific,” Ms. Macdonald said, “and this Victorian
idea of science as beauty and something you want to display in your
home.”

Just to put your mind at ease…terrariums have come a long way
since the 70’s. No more layers of multi-colored sand in the bottom!
And, please no gnome houses!!

Kangaroo Blue, Button & Frosty Ferns
[Picture+5.png]

The Photography Of Eva Mueller via [ifitshipitshere.blogspot]

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Bavarian-born photographer Eva Mueller
is best known for her projection photography – projected light, shape
and texture on nudes. But frankly, I find those are the least inventive
and beautiful of her work.

With an enormous portfolio that includes
everything from CD and album covers to lipstick ads, her large body of
work is quite diverse, despite certain stylistic commonalities. She
often acts as the art director for her own shoots, utilizing her
knowledge of graphic design for both the concepts and compositions.
Minimal and graphic, bold and clean, Mueller says her vision is that of
“less is more.”

Once you pour over the following images, you’ll
find that whether it’s gritty and black and white or slick and bright,
indoors or outdoors, stylized or natural, her work has an undeniable
beauty.

Some of her photos of men:




Some of her photos of women:



Some of her beauty and make-up
photography:



Some of her projection photography:


Some of her music photography:



Some of her personal work:



The photographer:

She’s shot for American and British
record labels, editorials for the New York, Vellum and Zink magazine,
ad campaigns for Steve Madden, Panasonic, Master Card and Guinness. her
personal work, which consist largely of nudes, has been displayed in
galleries and museums in London, Germany and the US.

To see her
complete portfolio, visit EvaMueller.com
all images and info courtesy of the
photographer.



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Fashion Designer Spotlight: Mark Fast, The Knitwear King via [worshipworthy]

Mark Fast has been one of my favorite newer designers for the past
couple of seasons. Having just graduated Central Saint Martins in 2008,
the Canadian-born knitwear designer has been a rising star in London.
Unbeknownstly but cleverly so, he stirred up a bit of controversy when
he decided to use plus-sized models in his S/S 2010 runway show.

I was further impressed by him when he declined to lend clothes to
Lady Gaga, his soft-spoken voice stating:

“My work is about a lifestyle. It’s not fast-food fashion. It’s
not about trends, it’s about classic, it’s about the body, it’s about
beauty. Maybe that gets lost in the picture with certain celebrities.”

With no disrespect to the Fame Monster, his clothes truly deserve to
shine for themselves.

For more info, visit <a onclick=”javascript:pageTracker._trackPageview
(‘/outbound/www.markfast.net’);” href=”http://www.markfast.net/&#8221; target=”_blank”>Mark Fast

Mark Fast’s new affordable line “Faster” is available at <a onclick=”javascript:pageTracker._trackPageview
(‘/outbound/www.shopcurve.com’);” href=”http://www.shopcurve.com/&#8221; target=”_blank”>Curve

And joining in with the rest of my favorite London-based deisgners,
he is the latest one to design his first ever Topshop collection, which
comes out in April/May. Can’t wait!

-Sophie



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Ultra Modern Baby Bassinet Hammock via [ModernNursery]

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Hushamok Experience Modern Bassinet Hammock
& Stand in Green

Manufacturer: Hushamok
$379.00 USD

The next generation in baby furniture!

hushamokTM
is the ideal sleeping environment for your baby, providing you with the
safety your baby requires without sacrificing style.

The
versatility of hushamokTM not only provides a sturdy anchor
for the safety of your baby, but is also a fashionable design addition
that complements any style decor. hushamokTM is durable,
lightweight and portable, making it ideal for around the home or packed
for travel.

hushamokTM also guards against
potentially serious health concerns that can arise during baby’s sleep.
The innovative design of hushamokTM enables baby to sleep
soundly on their backs, which is a key recommendation in the prevention
of SIDs. hushamokTM creates a restful and nurturing sleep
environment, and is designed to reduce the incidence of flat head
syndrome.

Features

  • Baby hammock made with the highest quality, preshrunk 100% cotton
  • Machine washable and available in an array of bright colors
  • Stylish stand will complement any room, and its lightweight steel
    construction means you can use it anywhere
  • Patented leaf spring guarantees a gentle, natural motion that will
    soothe any baby into a restful sleep
  • Soft and comfortable poly-filled, hypoallergenic mattress fits
    snugly in the baby hammock and is machine washable for easy care
  • includes two custom fitted sheets made of 400-count cotton which are
    available in the same vivid colors as the hammock (additional sheets
    sold separately)
  • Includes convenient cotton travel bag which makes your Hushamok
    Experience portable so your baby can enjoy a restful sleep anywhere

Dimensions

  • 40w x 53h x 40d inches overall (101.6 cm x 134.6 cm x 101.6 cm)
  • Baby hammock with sheet and leaf spring weighs 2.5 pounds (1.1 kg)
  • Stand weighs 18 pounds (8.2 kg)
  • in the US, Hushamok baby hammock is recommended for children up to
    22 pounds

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NEW Space Age Bath Cocoons and Home Spas via [MSN]

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Bathrooms of the future (© ProSun International, LLC, Diamond   Spas, Inc. & Kohler Co.)

Bathrooms of the future

By Marilyn Lewis of MSN Real Estate

Watching trends in the real-estate market is crucial for homeowners who are interested in remodeling, because a smart upgrade lets you also boost or sustain your home’s value. Spa baths are hot now, and the trend appears to have lasting appeal. It got started 30 years ago, when futurist Faith Popcorn predicted a movement she called “cocooning.” American consumers would desire to protect themselves “from the harsh, unpredictable realities of the outside world,” she predicted. Today, more than ever, we are seeking sanctuary in improvements such as home spas. Plumbing manufacturers are watching the trends — working from home, the demand for high-tech advances and green products, and the yearning for individual expression — and they’re responding with products that profoundly change the humble bath.

Bathrooms of the future (© LineaAqua LLC)

Space-age steam shower

While the future is mysterious, one thing’s a given: There will be stress. The newest bath products emphasize in-home spa features, making it possible to relieve stress thoroughly and in privacy. LineaAqua’s Apollo steam shower looks like a personal space capsule: The built-in reclined seat could be an astronaut’s anti-gravity chair. The blue-tinted safety glass and teak accents add to the futuristic look. You set the unit’s controls to manage the electronic temperature and steam generator or just lean back and use a remote to direct six adjustable massaging body sprays and a foot massage feature. Dim the unit’s mood lighting and crank up the audio speaker (the shower has a built-in FM radio and AUX connections for integrating your own sound system).

Cost: $24,400

Bathrooms of the future (© ProSun International, LLC)

Tan while you shower

When is a shower more than just a shower? In this case, when it gives you a tan and improves your complexion while you’re washing up. ProSun’s SunShower unit lets you incorporate a tanning unit, including five 400-watt lamps, reflectors and a double UV filter, into a shower. The 8-inch-thick unit can be added to a pre-existing shower enclosure or installed during new construction. Crave more? You can add high-intensity LED infrared light, said to stimulate the skin’s production of collagen and elastin. Units are framed in aluminum, brass or chrome — or in oil-rubbed bronze, to match your skin.

Cost: $10,900 to $17,995.

Bathrooms of the future (© American Standard)

Touch-sensitive controls

Bathroom basin, tub and shower faucets designed by architect Jean Nouvel for Jado and American Standard use touch-sensitive electronic controls that let users program — and save — their favorite volume and temperature settings. This shower’s elegant profile emphasizes function and clean lines.

Cost: Jean Nouvel Thermostatic Shower Curtain, $3,130.

Bathrooms of the future (© Kohler Co.)

Mix up the shower

Did you ever suspect you’d see a digital, menu-based navigation system for a shower in your lifetime? Check it out: The Kohler DTV II performance shower (in satin nickel, satin chrome or satin bronze) lets you mix up a custom shower experience. You use the digital controls to preset the four in-shower audio speakers, six shower heads (with 22 or 54 nozzles, for a rain-forest experience), steam and two hand-held shower wands. For example, choose the steam temperature and time, cue up your favorite tunes from your MP3 player, find the light display to suit your mood (color sequences evoke a sunrise, sunset, clouds and reflective water) and choose settings for the Ambient Rain Watertile shower head.

Cost: $2,000 to $10,000.

Bathrooms of the future (© Grohe America, Inc.)

High-tech performance

The Ondus bath system by German plumbing company Grohe blends organic form with high-tech performance and puts digital control of faucets, tub and shower in the user’s hands. Bathers can preset water temperature and flow rate. Engineering attention has been spent to mimic the flow of natural phenomena like waterfalls and falling rain. Here is the Ondus digital sink faucet (left), the AquaFountain shower system with both wall-mounted and hand-held showers (center) and, in the background, a floor-mounted bath filler, each with customizable, precision controls.

Cost: faucet, $4,199; AquaFountain shower system, $7,999; floor-mounted tub filler, $6,300

Bathrooms of the future (© visiomatic)

Waterproof media center

Some people retreat to their home spas to shut out the world. Others want to bring it in. Make the bath your operations center with the visiPad media station, which gives you access to e-mail, SMS, Internet, telephone, radio, CDs and DVDs. Control the unit with a remote or use the splash-protected touch-screen. Made by Visiomatic, the German maker of integrated electronic home control and entertainment systems, the visiPad is offered in a range of screen sizes, from 10 inches to 46 inches across.

Cost: The complete system about $4,225

Bathrooms of the future (© Dacor)

Kitchen tech warms bath towels

It’s a rough, cold world out there, which is why your towels must be soft and warm. Dacor, a manufacturer of kitchen appliances, adapted its indoor/outdoor oven warming drawer — the electronic components tolerate moisture — to bathroom use. The 24-inch drawer can be faced with a custom panel to match cabinets or you can use a stainless steel panel. The drawer has four temperature levels and four timer settings so towels will be done to perfection at the moment you need them.

Cost: $1,327 with stainless drawer panel

Bathrooms of the future (© Aquavision)

Waterproof TV

See that picture on the bathroom mirror? It’s a waterproof, 17-inch wide-screen TV by the British company Aquavision. With the television turned on, the screen is visible from nearly 180 degrees, meaning that you can see it from just about everywhere in the room. The television can be installed above a bathtub or inside a shower or sauna, remaining clear and dry — not foggy, says Aquavision. HDTV is an option, and six screen sizes range from 10 inches to 40 inches.

Cost: about $4,250

Bathrooms of the future (© Aquavision)

TV and warm towels

The Aquavision Towel Rail TV combines two essentials of the bath of the future: warm towels and entertainment. When you’re not watching the waterproof 17-inch LCD television, it is a mirror.

Cost: $4,000 and up.

High-style bath furniture

Another bath trend is to bring the look of furniture into the bath for a clean, uncluttered atmosphere. Lacava’s Aquaplane vanities exemplify the trend with a two-drawer cabinet with a Wenge finish beneath a broad basin.

Cost: Cabinet $990 to $1,190; basin $490; medicine cabinet $835 to $980.

Washing and drying automated

Toto makes several hands-free bath fixtures, including this WI-Touch Hands-Free wireless remote control that lets you operate a faucet without touching it. An electronic valve controller is installed beneath the sink and activated when you touch a remote-controlled sensor or foot pedal. The remote can be placed on the floor or the countertop or installed at knee or elbow level within three feet of the control box. The aim is to minimize the spread of cold and flu viruses and bacteria and also reduce the work of cleaning the sink. The unit (cost: roughly $550) can be installed by a homeowner and used with any standard manual faucet. Toto also makes a recessed Clean Dry Hand Dryer,which the company says is extremely quiet, performs in less than 12 seconds and consumes a quarter of the energy of similar products. Its washable filter helps freshen room air.

Cost: roughly $1,200.

Bathrooms of the future (© Toto USA, Inc.)

Intelligent toilet

Toto’s “intelligent design” toilet seat uses a microcomputer to unite two traditional bathroom appliances, the toilet and bidet. After using the toilet, you stay seated on the heated digital Washlet seat, which is made of anti-bacterial plastic. Use the remote control unit to direct streams of warm, aerated water onto your body, eliminating the need for paper and reducing the spread of bathroom germs. (Guys use the remote control to lift the seat.) To use the drying cycle, choose one of three temperatures, sending a flow of warm air to dry your skin. The unit automatically self-cleans before and after each use. Most Washlet models have a remote control and docking station and work with any toilet. The premier Washlet S400 is compatible only with select Toto toilets: It flushes the toilet automatically three seconds after the user stands up and its  “intuitive” lid closes on its own.

Cost: $800 to $1,400.

Hidden tank

Toto was emphasizing water and energy conservation in its plumbing products long before “green” was cool. The newly released Aquia high-efficiency toilet has its tank hidden in the wall for a sleek, minimalist look that the Japanese plumbing manufacturer says was inspired by the lines in nature. The bowl is glazed with a material that helps keep grime from building up. The dual flushing system lets the user choose to use a smaller or larger amount of water used: 1.6 gallons per flush for full flush or 0.9 gallons for the light flush.

Cost: roughly $350 for the toilet and $660 for the concealed tank carrier.

Glowing basins

Translucent scratch- and heat-resistant epoxy resin is used in a new line of Toto Luminist sinks and tubs that can be lit from beneath to give bathrooms an otherworldy glow. Water temperature is digitally controlled by a knob on the surface of the sink or tub. A light indicator panel uses color to read water temperature: blue is cold; light purple indicates 93.2 degrees F; dark purple is 100.4 degrees and red is very hot — 107.6 degrees.

Cost: Neorest II Luminist lavatory with integrated sensor faucet $6,200; Neorest II Luminist soaking tub with integrated sensor bath faucet, $17,500.

Massage with sound

Kohler’s VibrAcoustic Bath mixes up the bath experience, adding music and sound vibration to an ergonomic tub to sooth the weary mind and body. A digital control panel lets you select tub level, water temperature and one of four instrumental compositions (Awakening, Solitude, Letting Go and Transcendence). Music is piped underwater through one stereo system and played into the atmosphere through a second. Or choose other massage presets and add your own music by operating your MP3 player through the system. Colored “chromatherapy” lights are choreographed to the music.

Cost: $10,000 to $13,000, including electronic controls


Take off the chill

In the quest to make the bath into a cozy haven, homeowners are installing small, direct-vent natural gas or propane fireplaces. For example, Canadian manufacturer Napoleon reports that any of its direct-vent gas fireplaces can be used in a bathroom. This model, the Torch, measures just 12 inches across and has a shallow firebox that fits nicely between 2-by-6-inch wall studs. It puts out about 6,000 BTUs.

Cost: Suggested retail price starts at $1,608

Bathrooms of the future (© Diamond Spas, Inc.)

Japanese influence

Diamond Spas‘ Bennett reports a trend toward individual expression in bathrooms. “The shift I see is in aquatic personalization.  People are looking for something unique, handcrafted quality and beauty, a bath made by artisans rather than mass-produced, a bath that was made exclusively for them.” City apartment and loft dwellers often choose small, deep Japanese soaking baths that provide a space-saving vertical soak rather than horizontal, she says. This circular, one-person tub, 42 inches around by 35 inches deep, has a bench seat.

Cost: $15,284.

Luxury tubs

“Soaking tub” is a term used a lot for luxury tubs. “Designs vary from a smaller bath with a deeper depth, such as a Japanese soaker, to a large rectangular bath with a body forming contoured bottom,” says Stephanie Bennett of Diamond Spas, a Colorado company that crafts custom stainless steel and copper tubs to buyers’ specifications. The tub pictured here is a contemporary, oval, full-skirted soaking bath designed for two: 42 inches wide by 72 inches long by 24 inches deep. It has a midcontoured bottom with a sloping reclined area at each end for relaxing face-to-face conversation.

Cost: $16,982.


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