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Archive for Andy Warhol

OPULUXELtd.com™ Says Farewell to The Last of Hollywood Royalty: Elizabeth Taylor (1932-2011)

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Andy Warhol’s Liz Taylor portrait could fetch as much as $30 million

posted byNaveen via [BornRich]

andy warhol liz 5 painting

Some unidentified private collector is going to make some huge money when his iconic Andy Warhol painting of Elizabeth Taylor will go under the hammer on May 12 in New York. Auction house Phillips de Pury & Company is handling the sale. English-born American actress Elizabeth Taylor, often referred to as Liz Taylor, died of heart failure this Wednesday at the age of 79. Liz Taylor was a two-time winner of the Academy Award for Best Actress, and is considered as one of the greatest screen actresses of Hollywood’s Golden Age. The “Liz #5″ was painted in 1963, and is expected to sell for between $20 million and $30 million. Michael McGinnis, Senior Director and Worldwide Head, Contemporary Art, said…

Liz #5 is a pristine gem. It is Warhol at his very best with a perfect screen, glowing colors, and impeccable provenance. She is classic yet every bit as cutting edge as she was when Warhol painted her nearly 50 years ago.

Liz #5 embodies everything that a major collector of 20th and 21st century art desires and we are thrilled to offer this rare and exciting opportunity to the market.

Liz Taylor was one of Warhol’s most famous inspirations alongside Marilyn Monroe and Jackie Kennedy. In Liz #5, her radiant face emerges from a rich turquoise background, perfectly capturing her luminous skin, striking violet eyes and red lips.

The highest auction price ever paid for a Warhol painting is $71.7 million paid in 2007 for his 1963 painting, Green Car Crash (Green Burning Car I), depicts an overturned car on fire.

Via: LA Times/Stuff

 

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In Memory of Elizabeth Taylor via [Polyvore]

Yesterday we lost a true Hollywood legend and style icon. Known for her beauty and style both off screen and on, Elizabeth Taylor’s violet eyes mesmerized us all. Taylor’s passing marks the end of an era in Hollywood. Here is a compilation of tribute sets created in her memory. Rest in peace, starlet.

Paul Smith knee length dress
279 GBP – paulsmith.co.uk

Christian Louboutin high heels
$795 – shopsavannahs.com

Alexander McQueen leather handbag
$1,095 – couture.zappos.com

Rose flower brooch
3.95 AUD – fashionaddict.com.au

Diamond ring
$2,850 – buy.com

Twist ring
$3,850 – tiffany.com

Diamond stud earring
$9,950 – kohls.com

Issa crepe dress
$655 – net-a-porter.com

Tory Burch rabbit coat
408 GBP – net-a-porter.com

Manolo blahnik shoes
$1,495 – barneys.com

Celestina mirror handbag
$1,925 – net-a-porter.com

Green jewelry
$14,249 – zales.com

12 Peach Roses Giftwrap – flowers –
30 GBP – arenaflowers.com

Marchesa strapless evening gown
1,629 GBP – theoutnet.com

Calvin Klein gold shoes
$556 – bluefly.com

Miss Selfridge cream handbag
28 GBP – missselfridge.com

Elizabeth Taylor by Ania1203 featuring a twist ring

Paul Smith knee length dress
279 GBP – paulsmith.co.uk

Christian Louboutin high heels
$795 – shopsavannahs.com

Alexander McQueen leather handbag
$1,095 – couture.zappos.com

Rose flower brooch
3.95 AUD – fashionaddict.com.au

Diamond ring
$2,850 – buy.com

Twist ring
$3,850 – tiffany.com

Diamond stud earring
$9,950 – kohls.com

Elizabeth Taylor – Luxury Lipstick – # 05 Glamorous 4g/0.14oz
$12 – yesstyle.com

Elizabeth Taylor – White Diamonds Eau De Toilette Spray 50ml/1.7oz
$31 – yesstyle.com

HYPNÔSE PRECIOUS CELLS, Mascaras: Eyes by Lancôme
lancome.co.uk

Bazzill Basics – 12×12 Mini Scallop Cardstock – Coal
$0.79 – scrapbook.com

Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor by audrey2323 featuring swarovski earrings

Cap sleeve dress
$176 – shopambience.com

Rupert Sanderson slip on shoes
$575 – boutique1.com

SR Squared by Sondra Roberts beach handbag
$98 – piperlime.gap.com

Swarovski earring
$99 – myjewelrybox.com

Smooth Eye Colour Quad Nude
37 GBP – harrods.com

Classic Cream Lipstick Chocolate
22 GBP – harrods.com

Flameless 3″x3″ Pillar Candle
$7.95 – crateandbarrel.com

Pear and Apple candle gift set DL & Co
120 GBP – harveynichols.com

BLOMSTER
$25 – ikea.com

Elizabeth taylor

Elizabeth taylor by Coolbeans 🙂 featuring vintage style dresses

Leather biker jacket
$830 – alexandermcqueen.com

Baldinini sandal
mercedeh-shoes.com

Elizabeth

Elizabeth by sparkler003 featuring kitten shoes

Rose kitten shoes
519 EUR – veryeickhoff.com

J by Jasper Conran black handbag
25 GBP – debenhams.com

LÖNSBODA
$3.99 – ikea.com

Nordstrom Felt Bloom Pillow
$78 – nordstrom.com

Lalique 2 Anemones Flacon, Black
$395 – bloomingdales.com

Waterford “Black Cut” Vase, 12″
$495 – bloomingdales.com

Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor by zettirik featuring square toe pumps

Diane von Furstenberg strappy dress
298 GBP – matchesfashion.com

Rupert Sanderson square toe pumps
$575 – boutique1.com

Reed Krakoff leather clutch
$990 – net-a-porter.com

MNG by Mango oval ring
$24 – jcpenney.com
My tribute to the remarkable Elizabeth Taylor

My tribute to the remarkable Elizabeth Taylor by Claire Storace featuring sandals high heels

D G couture dress
858 EUR – my-wardrobe.com

B. Ella sandals high heels
99 GBP – coast-stores.com

Leather handbag
294 EUR – luisaviaroma.com

A Classic Beauty..♥♥..RIP

A Classic Beauty..♥♥..RIP by diz on Polyvore.com

Dame Elizabeth Taylor
fuckyeahelizabethtaylor.tumblr.com

Elizabeth Taylor
facade.com

Grey Square. Use,
servimg.com

" For Elizabeth Taylor "

” For Elizabeth Taylor “ by Kate O featuring diamond stud earrings

Notte by Marchesa strapless dress
$488 – theoutnet.com

Kg shoes
100 GBP – houseoffraser.co.uk

Aspinal of London gold clutch
295 GBP – houseoffraser.co.uk

Diamond stud earring
1,199 GBP – houseoffraser.co.uk

Rose diamond ring
$449 – jewelry.hsn.com

Elizabeth

Elizabeth by Monica Rich Kosann featuring a tank dress

Alexander Wang tank dress
$368 – lagarconne.com

Christian Louboutin platform high heels
495 GBP – net-a-porter.com

Handbag
$6,455 – fineartoffamily.com

Jewelry
$14,725 – fineartoffamily.com

Gold earring
$1,300 – fineartoffamily.com

Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor by ❥∂wєsoмє☮ßuddყ33 featuring pearl jewelry

Miss Selfridge pink dress
36 GBP – missselfridge.com

Christian louboutin shoes
550 GBP – brownsfashion.com

Briolette freshwater pearl jewelry
$65 – yesstyle.com

Mawi pearl jewelry
95 GBP – my-wardrobe.com

Mawi pearl jewelry
95 GBP – my-wardrobe.com

Chain jewelry
$30 – topshop.com

Bella V – Stunning : Target
$3.99 – target.com

Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor by ❥∂wєsoмє☮ßuddყ33 featuring pearl jewelry

Miss Selfridge pink dress
36 GBP – missselfridge.com

Christian louboutin shoes
550 GBP – brownsfashion.com

Briolette freshwater pearl jewelry
$65 – yesstyle.com

Mawi pearl jewelry
95 GBP – my-wardrobe.com

Mawi pearl jewelry
95 GBP – my-wardrobe.com

Chain jewelry
$30 – topshop.com

Bella V – Stunning : Target
$3.99 – target.com

Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor by Fashion iis featuring high heels

Phase Eight gothic lolita dress
160 GBP – johnlewis.com

Rupert Sanderson high heels
$575 – boutique1.com

Brian Danielle diamond earring
$3,890 – maxandchloe.com

Sterling silver cuff bracelet
$49 – amazon.com

Lancôme Color Design Eye Brightening All-in-One 5 Shadow & Liner…
$48 – lancome-usa.com

Lipstick, Baby Berry 580, 0.15 oz (4.2 g)- Revlon-Beauty-Lips-Lipstick…
$7.49 – kmart.com

Which classic film vixen is the sexiest? – Page 2
$30 – squidoo.com

 

Tags: #BornRich, #AndyWarhol, #ElizabethTaylor, #Hollywood, #RichardBurton, #ms.melanieperignon, #opuluxelifestyledesign, #polyvore


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Around the Town in A Day With Miami’s Most Vivacious Socialite, Barbara Becker

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OPULUXE Lounge GroovesPlayList

On the Town with Barbara Becker

For the German-born socialite, actress and model, a day isn’t complete without caviar, wallpaper, Warhols and barbecue ribs.

BY Bill Kearney

Clockwise from top left: Becker (left) shows Sam Robin her latest collection of wallpaper; With Sandee Saunders at Caviar Kaspia; With Saunders at The Webster; With Dorothy Blau in front of Blau’s portrait by Andy Warhol; Chef David Whyko heads the table at Delishe; From left, Saunders, Author Lynn Gallow, Maryel Epps, Becker and Robin at Delishe

2:30 PMBarbara runs around the toy-strewn front yard of her Venetian Causeway colonial in bare feet with the kind of frenetic yet unflappable demeanor of someone who’s used to wrangling children.

https://i1.wp.com/www.gala.de/asset/Image/artikel/talk/2009/kw37/becker-quinze-miami.jpg Barbara with her handsome husband Arne Quinze

She has been back from Russia for 24 hours (there to help artist/designer hubby Arne Quinze scout for an event), the kids are still overseas, and right now we’re off to kibitz with mentor/ interior designer Sam Robin, who was mistaken for Barbara’s mother at her wedding last fall in Germany. Bulldog Rocco and cocker spaniel Diva Baby Girl greet us with Sam, and we’re immediately offered glasses of Blanc de Blancs. Billie Holiday plays on the stereo and the girls discuss Barbara’s latest collection of wallpaper (she’s huge in Germany). Soon the conversation turns to kids and weddings, but they both stop and listen to the music a moment, singing together, “If I should take a notion, to jump into the ocean, ’tain’t nobody’s business if I do.”4:30 PM

We hit friend Dorothy Blau’s Bal Harbour condo. Dorothy was the first to bring Andy Warhol’s art to South Florida, and he gave her her signature haircut. Barbara’s in the market for a Christopher Makos. There’s a triptych portrait of Dorothy that Warhol painted in the dining room, and a Jasper Johnsin the kitchen. Dorothy offers white wine and advice about dealing with the death of loved ones, which is pretty much to celebrate that you even knew them. She and Barbara talk art, how to manage expectations and happiness, and set up a meeting between Dorothy and Arne.

6:30 PM

We rush into The Webster to catch BFF Sandee Saunders. Barbara goes gaga over Sandee’s Krelwear dress (she must have one), and there’s an impromptu runway strut. After a caviar session with chef Todd Adkins at Kaspia and a quick shopping excursion for a new bag, we’re off to a gal-pal dinner party at Delishe.

8 PM

At Delishe, chef David Whyko’s private dining spot on the Upper Eastside, Barbara meets with Kiki Kuhnert, president of Dolphin Aid (Barbara is a spokesperson), photog Iran Issa-Khan, singer Maryel Epps and some other friends for a gourmet soul-food dinner of collard greens, truffled mac and cheese, barbecue baby backs and wings. David’s wife, Author, takes music requests, and before long the girls are up and dancing. When the Temptations’ “My Girl” comes on, they all form a kick line, arm-in-arm, and sing along, but change the lyric to “My Girls.”

PHOTOGRAPH BY BILL KEARNEY

via [YouTube]

More on Barbara Becker here

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Peter Marino: Fashion’s Most Connected Man via [Harper’s Bazaar]

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Peter Marino: Fashion’s Most Connected Man

The industry’s hot-shot architect might just be his own greatest
creation.

Inducing sartorial insecurity in the big guns of Paris fashion —
particularly Karl Lagerfeld and John Galliano, with their iconic visual
status — is no mean feat. But their good friend Peter Marino managed it
at the unveiling of his renovation of the flagship Christian Dior
boutique in Paris in 2007.

“Karl Lagerfeld and John Galliano came,” starts Marino, sitting in
his expansive office, Steven Meisel photographs on the wall, a huge
David LaChapelle image of him on a Harley-Davidson in the corridor.
“John, as you know, dresses quite out there, and he came wearing a
leopard vest and a leopard hat. Karl came all in black, a shirt with a
very tall collar. And I came in a sleeveless leather shirt, leather
trousers, and my leather cap. John turned to Karl and said, ‘I don’t
know, baby. We’re going to have to get a bit further out there. Peter
has really gone a stretch.'”

Galliano couldn’t have said it better. In the past decade or so,
Marino has gone a stretch and then some. He’s become the fashion world’s
architectural adventurer, transforming our notions of luxury retail
with his work for Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Dior, and Fendi. His take on
flagship stores, like Chanel’s 10-story tower in Tokyo’s Ginza district,
with its high-tech glass facade, has turned boutiques into artistic
objects as well as priceless marketing tools, and he was doing it long
before the likes of Rem Koolhaas and Herzog & de Meuron deigned to
be commercial.

Simultaneously, he has renovated his own physical form as a Tom of
Finland drawing made flesh. Along with Marino’s extensive wardrobe of
S&M-tinged leathers, exclusively in black, there are his bulging
muscles — the result of five weekly gym visits — and some rather
wonderful tattoos: a vivid Chinese dragon that goes over his shoulder
and a sleek Japanese panther on his left forearm. It’s a stark contrast
to the button-down shirt and occasional tie he wore 35 years ago to his
first solo job: the renovation of Andy Warhol‘s townhouse. (He went on
to design the third Factory in New York at 860 Broadway and interiors
for such luminaries as Yves Saint Laurent and the Agnellis. In 1986, he
created the template for luxury department stores at the original
Barneys New York.)

peter marino

Today, he’s in full-on biker-boy gear. We’re meant to be chatting
about the collection of 16th-, 17th-, and 18th-century French and
Italian bronze sculptures he has amassed over two decades. Marino is an
obsessive collector of everything from Depression-era cookie jars —
something he began buying on fiea-market trips with Warhol — to Roman
antiquities. Thirty of Marino’s bronzes will be installed this spring at
the Wallace Collection in London for the show “Beauty and Power:
Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes from the Collection of Peter Marino.” On
display will be Samson and the Philistine, attributed to
Baccio Bandinelli, Antonio Montauti’s seductive Diana, a pair
of rare and beautiful high-baroque vases, and Bacchus and Ariadne
by Corneille Van Clève.

Marino is a bona fide lover of art. For his stores, he has flown in
artists like Michal Rovner, Jean-Michel Othoniel, Paola Pivi, and the
late François-Xavier Lalanne to do site-specific installations. “Other
firms bring in art; I bring in artists.”

Now, however, he starts cataloging the contents of his array of
leather fashions, which he has built up since rediscovering his love of
motorbikes. There are black leather straps to hold up his trousers,
straps to hold his wrists straight when he’s on one of his many bikes
(Harley-Davidsons, a Ducati, and his beloved Triumph), and arm straps of
which he jokes, “Because they help my veins come out when I need to
find them.” There are also Red Wing motorcycle boots, leather
neckerchiefs to block the wind from his chest (“I kind of invented it”),
skullcaps, and New Jersey patrolman hats.

“I started off with all Harley-Davidson clothes: leather jacket,
leather vest, leather trousers,” Marino explains in a lisping, almost
cut-glass English accent, though he hails from Queens. “And then,
because I’m in the fashion world, I had some gear made for me by Hedi
Slimane when he was still at Christian Dior. Really good gear: jackets
and coats. I still wear them. I can’t tell the other bikers that I got
them made by Hedi. It sounds so gay. I just say, ‘I got it from some old
catalog.’ I can’t say, ‘Oh, I got it custom-made in Paris by Dior.’ It
is beyond gay.” He chortles.

Marino also has Dior summer and autumn jackets with extended cuffs
and zippers. “I love zippers,” he says. “And Hedi’s summer pants are
paper thin. They are like wearing nothing. So I have change-of-season
leathers. Not many bikers have that; I’m a biker who is into fashion.”
All in all, Marino has about 25 pairs of leather trousers. “I have a
house in Aspen and a house in Southampton, so I keep a few pairs in each
of those.”

It turns out the architect even has his own leather tailor, found
once he started going to police and military shops in New York and
needed alterations. “They called me Policeman Pete in the office,” he
says. “I also got Amsterdam cop and Berlin cop uniforms.” Of course,
law-enforcement suppliers, even of the European variety, aren’t exactly
Hedi Slimane. Marino’s tailor made the pants tighter and added zippers
at the bottom and a stripe down the side. “That has become my signature
look,” he says. His wife, Jane Trapnell Marino, is a costume designer
and, according to Marino, “a big help.”

The leather-daddy look is one he gradually started adopting 12 years
ago, when he revisited his adolescent fascination with motorcycles
around the time his parents passed away. “No reason not to do what you
want to do anymore,” he says. “My wife was cool about it. She’s Scottish
— tough as nails.” At first, Marino would wear leathers to ride to work
and then change into a shirt and pants, which soon became a bother. “I
said, ‘I’m tired of changing into office clothes’ and started leaving my
leathers on. That was all. If I’m covered in mud now, we have some
hoses out there,” he says, winking. “And then, of course, I became
identified with leathers and I thought, why not?”

Others have not reacted as well as his spouse has to the newish
improved Marino. On a recent foray out in Paris with Marc Jacobs, he was
met with stunned silence. But Marino clearly delights in telling the
tale. “Marc and I went to a dinner about six months ago at a bourgeois
restaurant called Le Duc. The dinner was for the artist Andreas Gursky,
and both Marc and I collect him,” he says. “I walk in, ooh, in urban
drag, and Marc came in on my arm wearing a plaid miniskirt and boots.
The cutlery just dropped. Marc is like, ‘I don’t know, dear, we’ll just
have to get to the seat over there. No, we better go out now for a
smoke.’ I said, ‘We can’t go outside. We just walked in!’ It was a
horror, even though it was quite funny. Gursky, he’s German, so he
didn’t find us amusing. I was talking about photography. Stone silence.
It was hilarious.”

The parents and teachers at his daughter’s private school in
Manhattan weren’t much more receptive. “I wasn’t really a big hit with
the administration at the school,” Marino says. “Every time something
happened with my daughter, it was ‘What do you expect? Look at you.’ I’d
say, ‘What do you mean? I don’t understand.’ I let my wife take care of
the education after that.” There was little love from the school’s
mothers either, even though he designs the luxury stores many of them
shop with gusto. “Put it this way,” he says. “None of them ever talked
to me. New York is completely tribal. It is much more provincial than
people think, particularly in that world of private schools.”

Still, his leathers finally came in handy just as his daughter, now
18, was about to graduate, at her post-prom party. “I appeared in full
policeman’s drag with a very large baton. And I went like this,” he
says, making a light whacking gesture, “on the backs of [kids’] legs
when I saw any of the naughty kids drinking or doing something.” He
continues, “They have the rep for not behaving, because they just want
to get drunk. So I was Patrolman Pete in drag. I whacked a few backs of
thighs.” Of his daughter, Marino says, “She’s a bit of a rebel herself.
She is a chip off the old block. She looked like this at 16,” says
Marino as he shows me a Steven Meisel portrait of her. “She was a very
fast kid. Very fast. Who at 16 gets her photo taken by Steven Meisel as a
birthday gift? She was going to Paris couture shows at four years old.
That is not a normal upbringing.”

It sounds a bit like the pot calling the kettle black. Marino was
gallivanting around New York’s club scene and the Factory while barely
out of his teens. He has a reputation for living life at full throttle —
excuse the pun. As his dear friend John Galliano puts it, “Sometimes
when I go out onto the runway at the end of my shows, people debate
about my look. But it’s a show look to reflect the mood and the moment.
Peter is his own greatest creation, and it’s not limited just to
finales. When you go to an event with Peter, he pushes ‘total look’ to a
new extreme. I thought the fashion designers pushed the boundaries, but
when it comes to dress codes, Peter goes that whole extra mile! He is
great fun and a law unto himself. He makes you want to push yourself to
extremes, in your mind as much as with your own styling.” Galliano adds,
“With him, anything goes as long as it inspires him.”

Which brings us back to our original subject: Marino’s art
collection. “I’m obsessive about everything. It is just the way I am,
dude. I don’t know why,” he says, immune to the irony of using the word dude
while discussing a multimillion-dollar cache of works. “I collect
antiquities, I collect photography, I collect antique party books [from
the] 17th century.” Antique party books? “If Louis XIV visited
Strasbourg, the town would make a book with prints and [lists of] all
the party arrangements of each meal and everybody who went,” he
explains. “I have as many of those as I can get. I have the party book
of when William and Mary arrived in London. [It has] everybody who was
in their party and everybody who met them and what they were wearing
every day and at every meal. These are amazing. I really like them. I
used to be a party boy.”

And of course there are the 30 bronzes headed for the Wallace
Collection, which Marino describes as “magic.” French furniture expert
Thierry Millerand tells me later of Marino’s pieces, “There is a nice
diversity in this collection. You have small bronzes, you have big ones.
You have pairs, you have single ones. There are major masterpieces. It
is a great survey. The most important is by French sculptor Corneille
Van Clève: Bacchus and Ariadne. It is a major, major piece. The
size and the composition, the sculpture. Whichever angle you look at it
from, you find no mistake. The patina is another important element in
the appreciation of bronzes. And this is a beautiful, beautiful thing.”

Says Marino of his prized pieces, “It’s everything I love: great
artistry combined with great technical prowess. I love the depth and the
patina that gets better with age. You are supposed to touch bronze; it
is very sensual. The more you touch them, the better they are. I really
like the finishes, most of which are black. Someone once asked me what
my favorite color was. I said you have got to be joking.”