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Futuristic Chinese Bus to solve traffic jams. via [huffpost]

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China Plans Huge Buses That Can DRIVE OVER Cars (PHOTOS)

China has overtaken the United States as the world’s biggest producer of greenhouse gases and biggest energy consumer.But the country is also thinking in big and bold ways when it comes to how it will reduce pollution and a new plan to build a “straddling bus” is among the most space-age schemes yet.

According to China Hush, the 6-meter-wide 3D Express Coach will be powered by a combination of electricity and solar energy, and will be able to travel up to 60 kilometers per hour carrying some 1200 to 1400 passengers.

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IN PHOTOS: See more pictures of the futuristic bus here.



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10 Frozen Treats For Your Pets To Eat via [apartmenttherapy]

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OPULUXE Lounge GroovesPlayList

10 Frozen DIY Pet Treats

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  • Sarah Rae Trover

072210-dogicecream.jpg Although our main focus is usually on food for human consumption, with the weather oh-so-toasty lately, our four-legged friends are also in need of a little refreshment. Snacks for pets are always less expensive to make yourself and we’ve rounded up 10 ideas to keep them cool and your wallet full all at the same time!

Without getting into the world of what’s actually healthy for dogs to eat, we’d like to give you a few options of great frozen snacks for dogs and cats alike. We’re not big on adding fruits and vegetables to this mix, but you’re welcome to do so (though we suggest researching it first). We’ll be sticking to meats and proteins and staying away from sugar.

Here are a few of our favorite frozen treats for pets:

1. Ice Cubes: Plain, simple and easy.
2. Frozen Yogurt: You can buy pre-made or simply freeze regular yogurt containers. It’s as good for their digestive tracks as it is for yours. Helps those animals that are especially gassy! (older animals might require less dairy, try mixing half yogurt/half water for those who need a little help)
3. Frozen Liver: Cut chicken/beef liver into small bite size pieces and place on a sheet pan covered in parchment paper. Feed 2 or 3 pieces daily (unless raw feeding and then you may feed regular daily amount). They keep well in a zip lock once frozen.
4. Frozen Egg: Although this one is best eaten outside, toss an egg or two in a blender (including shells) and blend till smooth. Freeze in an ice cube tray (half way full) for easier dispensing. Do not feed more than 1 per day to ensure proper nutrient absorption.
5. Tuna: There isn’t much a cat or a dog won’t do for tuna. For them, it’s just as tasty cold, so freeze in small bite size pieces or mounds on parchment, or even blend with any of the ingredients above before freezing.
6. Organic Low Sodium Broth: Broth is a good base to mix in all sorts of things. Add a bit of peanut butter or assorted meats. If you tape off the end of a Kong toy (for dogs or cats) and fill the toy with broth, they’ll be able to slowly lick at it as it melts.
7. Cheese Chunks: You can freeze them as is, or try freezing them in something else (broth or water) for extra visual appeal.
8. Hot Dog Bits: Although you can freeze almost any meat and we’re believers that raw meat is better than cooked, we still don’t know a dog who says no to a hot dog. We do suggest cutting them length wise (in strips) so your animal doesn’t try to swallow it whole and choke.
9. Baby Food: Try to find one that doesn’t (or shouldn’t) contain onion powder and your pets will do almost anything for it! Freeze in mini muffin cups for easy feeding.
10. Commercial Retail Popsicles: If you check your local grocer, they often sell doggy popsicles right next to the human ones. We’ve tried them on several occasions and our pups won’t go near them, but we know many who do. We have personally taste tested them ourselves (what, we were curious?!) and we’re pretty sure the options above will be far tastier!

Do you have a favorite frozen treat to feed your pet? Just in case you’d like to experiment on making your own, here’s a list of items that are toxic to dogs and cats, so make sure to review or check with your vet before you begin!





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8 Fruits You Can Grow Indoors via [msn/shine]

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{by Reader’s Digest Magazine,

From All-Season Guide to Gardening

If you have a spacious, airy sunroom, conservatory or glazed porch, you can grow a variety of potted fruits, including figs, citrus and grapes. Apricots and peaches often crop earlier and better under cover than outdoors, although they benefit from spending the warm summer months out in the garden, as do most types of fruit trees and shrubs.

With the exception of strawberries, most fruit-producing plants are trees or shrubs that need a deep and nutritious root run, so choose containers that are at least 1 foot (30 cm) in diameter and a little more in depth. As plants grow, move them into larger pots or small tubs. You can also root prune them each year to maintain a convenient size. Alternatively, for mature plants, remove just the top layer of soil in the pot and replace this with fresh compost each spring.

In general use a soil-based compost placed over a generous layer of drainage material such as earthenware crocks, pebbles or gravel. Water and feed regularly, especially while plants are bearing flowers and fruit, when a high-potash fertilizer is recommended.

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{1.} Figs

All varieties fruit more heavily if their roots are confined to a large pot, but Negro Largo does particularly well as a houseplant. A temperature range of 55 to 65°F (13 to 18°C) can limit the mature size of the plant, but it may still be necessary to prune in summer and winter to control exuberant growth. Set in a well-lit spot away from direct sun, and feed the plant sparingly two or three times in the growing season.

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{2.} Peaches and Nectarines

Natural or genetically dwarf varieties such as bonanza (peach) and nectarella (nectarine) can be grown as short standards on 30-inch (75 cm) stems. Keep them indoors in a well-lit, sunny position in temperatures of 50 to 55°F (10 to 13°C) until fruit sets, when they will require higher temperatures of 65 to 70°F (18 to 21°C). Ventilate freely in warm weather.

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{3.} Strawberries

Alpine strawberries in pots on a sunny windowsill will fruit almost continuously from early summer until mid-autumn. Large-fruited strawberries will also do well, and are especially valuable when forced to produce early fruit. To stimulate early strawberries, pot up plants in autumn in 5- to 6-inch (13 to 15 cm) pots and leave in a well-lit room. The plants should develop edible crops from late spring onwards, after which they can be discarded or planted out in the garden to grow on.

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{4.} Apricots

Compact varieties such as Shipleys and Goldcot on semi-dwarfing St Julien A rootstocks are highly productive in pots, especially if they are trained against a sunny conservatory wall. For apricots, use a soil-less potting compost over plenty of drainage material. To ensure fruit, hand pollinate by transferring pollen from one flower to another with a paintbrush.

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{5.} Grapes

A vine provides shade and looks ornamental trained up walls and across the roof of a conservatory. Ventilate freely to prevent mildew spoiling the fruit. Each winter, shorten the sideshoots back to two buds.

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{6.} Mulberries

This slow-growing tree is ideal for a large pot. For tasty fruits that ripen in early summer, grow the black mulberry Morus nigra Chelsea in bright, indirect light in a well-ventilated spot, at 55 to 70°F (13 to 21°C).

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{7.} Cape Gooseberries

The cape gooseberry (Physalis pruinosa) and ground cherry (P. angulata) both make bushy pot plants, with small, tomato-like, white flowers and cherry-size, yellow or red fruits in papery husks. They are very prolific when grown in large pots, 1 foot (30 cm) or more across, in direct sunlight near a window.

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{8.} Dwarf Pomegranate

For pot cultivation, choose the small Punica granatum var. nana, which grows only 3 feet (90 cm) high and often produces its conspicuous scarlet flowers while relatively immature. Attractive miniature fruits follow in early autumn but seldom ripen. Plenty of ventilation and sunlight are needed, especially in late summer and autumn.





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